Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
atticus

April 19, 1775

Recommended Posts

sprocket

The first black man who died for this country died on Lexington green - I do not remember his name.

 

Dr Prescott was found on the way and he never saw his finance after that night - died on a prison ship IIRC.

 

There's discussion of a 3rd rider leaving Boston to go north - how else did Salem, Billerica and other towns get the call?

 

The Hackett book about Paul Revere is excellent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ken E Bago

Every year, for the past 20 years or so, I have watched the reenactment of the Battle of Lexington on the Lexington Green (at 5:30 in the morning). Every year I am reminded of the bravery and sacrifices of those men.... a group of farmers standing their ground against a very imposing group of highly trained British soldiers.

 

A good friend of ours owns the Jonathon Harrington house on the Battle Green (he died at battle that day) , so I am fortunate to get an unobstructed view watching the battle from inside the house. During the battle reenactment, the Jonathon Harrington actor leaves the house, confronts the British, is shot, crawls back to his house, and dies on the doorstep.

The reenactment lasts only a few minutes, and when it is over, the British begin their march to Concord with the fife and drums playing Yankee Doodle and with the dying and injured minutemen lying on the Green.

 

If you ever get the chance, it's something worth seeing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Salt Creek GSP

The black man who died was Crispus Attucks. There is a high school in Indianapolis named for him. It is the high school that the Big O, Oscar Robertson attended.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sprocket
2 hours ago, Ken E Bago said:

Every year, for the past 20 years or so, I have watched the reenactment of the Battle of Lexington on the Lexington Green (at 5:30 in the morning). Every year I am reminded of the bravery and sacrifices of those men.... a group of farmers standing their ground against a very imposing group of highly trained British soldiers.

 

A good friend of ours owns the Jonathon Harrington house on the Battle Green (he died at battle that day) , so I am fortunate to get an unobstructed view watching the battle from inside the house. During the battle reenactment, the Jonathon Harrington actor leaves the house, confronts the British, is shot, crawls back to his house, and dies on the doorstep.

The reenactment lasts only a few minutes, and when it is over, the British begin their march to Concord with the fife and drums playing Yankee Doodle and with the dying and injured minutemen lying on the Green.

 

If you ever get the chance, it's something worth seeing.

 

And his wife watches from the upper window...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tracker 6

Crispus Attucks was killed in the Boston Massacre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
atticus

I remember reading there was an African American on Lexington green but had to look up the details. 

 

Prince Estabrook, was a black slave who served in the town's militia and was wounded but survived. According to what I found he got permission to serve and served in the militia until joining the continental army. He was later emancipated and is buried in the next town over from mine. I'll go see if I can find his headstone this spring. 

 

Link to info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NHBirddogger
On ‎4‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 10:42 PM, sprocket said:

Barretts Mill - That's not the name that rings a bell - is that where the Militiamen fired first?  The start of of the Bloody Retreat?  I call that place the Conception Point - where Americans fired first on the British - up until then we were all British...400 militia found a retreating professional army and opened up without provocation - a sort of third strike of the match to start the fire of revolution.  "Circle of Fire" tactic was born as well...So many things.

 

I've forgotten a lot about that day but yes, Paul Rever's Ride - The Hackett Book - is excellent.  1/3 preface. 1/3 events, 1/3 facts and figures -weather, tides, crap only a history guy would document...the last 1/3 is worth digging in to...

Yup, Barretts Farm is on Barretts Mill Rd, as mentioned the British were there looking for arms to destroy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quailguy
On 4/19/2018 at 10:45 PM, sprocket said:

 

Emerson and other poets had no clue - but they were eloquent with words.  The poem about Revere and his ride = a steaming pile of horse crap

 

 

 

  Ah, but it takes a really good poet or story teller to make famous the deeds of good men and to imprint those deeds of courage into the brains of day dreaming school children and distracted adults.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quailguy

The current thought is that about 20 percent of the colonists were LOYALISTS — those whose remained loyal to England and King George. Another small group in terms of percentage were the dedicated PATRIOTS, for whom there was no alternative but independence.

On the Fence

Often overlooked are the fence-sitters who made up the largest group.

With so many Americans undecided, the war became in great measure a battle to win popular support. If the patriots could succeed in selling their ideas of revolution to the public, then popular support might follow and the British would be doomed.

 

http://www.ushistory.org/us/11b.asp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sprocket

If you made a movie about the events, people would say it's a horrible story - could never happen...Star Wars was better (Episode 4 A New Hope only)

 

I know there is debate about the 1/3% theory - that 1/3 were for revolution, another on the fence and the other loyal to the crown. - I think that's a overall number overseeing the entire population.  So I'll bet it's equally true there were high concentrations of each spread out among the colonies. 

 

For a time that limited methods of communication, it's pretty remarkable that so much was documented.

 

The part of Sam Whittemore to be played by Clint Eastwood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×