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dogrunner

F150 diesel.

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dogrunner

Available soon.  

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Randy S

If 30 mpg is real, then it'll be worth a look. That's about twice what my gas F-150 gets.

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67diesel

It is real, Randy.

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Dogwood

$?

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kgb

A friend bought a small-diesel Dodge 1500 a few years back when they came out, but I just heard he's sold it.  He loved it when he bought it, I'm curious why he's sold it and will find out next month.

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Flush
On 4/20/2018 at 1:57 PM, Randy S said:

If 30 mpg is real, then it'll be worth a look. That's about twice what my gas F-150 gets.

 

I'm sure it is real, the Ram 1500 diesel is at 27mpg currently.

The Chevy Colorado diesel which is a mid size truck (but is pretty big) is at 30mpg currently.

 

This F150 diesel is interesting, and I'm glad it's an option, but I wonder how well it will sell (and how much it will cost?)

 

The current F150 gas (2.7 ecoboost) is rated at 26mpg highway so while 30mpg is impressive, this new diesel is only 15% better than the most efficient gas version.

 

I just checked and the national average for gasoline right now is $2.75/gallon and diesel is $3.10/gallon that's just under a 13% difference. It's been that difference (or more) for a long time now, and I doubt it will change any time soon.

 

So....from a simple fuel economy cost savings it's unlikely most people will save any money with this after factoring in the diesel upgrade cost.

But for some people I'm sure it will make sense. When actually towing heavy loads, the efficiency differences between the diesel and gas will likely be more favorable for the diesel, but since the EPA numbers don't include towing fuel economies, it will be hard to "prove" this on paper.

The diesel will have more towing capablity than the 2.7 eco-boost and will be more on par for towing with the 3.5 eco-boost (which is at 25mpg highway).

 

BTW, all these mpg numbers are for 2WD for comparison sake, the Ford article shown conveniently left out it was for 2WD, so I'm sure that was the case.

Probably an overall 1-2mpg drop for 4wd, but the differences/percentages won't change much.

 

 

Since I have them, I will list some specs below for some comparable trucks 

 

Ram 1500 diesel 2wd 

mpg city/hwy  20/27

240hp 420ft-lbs

 

Chevy Colorado diesel 2wd

mpg city/hwy 22/30

181hp 369ft-lbs

 

 

Ford F150 2wd:

 

3.3 (gas, non turbo)

mpg city/hwy 19/25

181hp 369ft-lbs

 

2.7 (gas, turbo)

mpg city/hwy 20/26

325hp 400ft-lbs

 

3.5 (gas, turbo)

mpg city/hwy 18/25

375hp 470ft-lbs

 

3.0 (diesel, turbo)

mpg city/hwy 22/30

250hp 440ft-lbs

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sidelock

Diesel trucks cost much more than comparable gas trucks for the same repairs and maintenance generally speaking and the injectors cost thousands of dollars to replace. Dont ask me how i know !

A recent alternator replacement for my Ram 2500 cost just shy of $600 CDN. and rebuilt injectors for the 5.9 Cummins are over $600 each. Multiply that by six, add labour and tax on top of all that and you're well into 5K. for injectors alone.

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blanked

So another words if you run it for 10 years hard you might break even compared to a gas motor

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terrym

When you factor in the price of diesel fuel, DEF, tuneups and the upcharge for that option unless you tow something heavy with it most people would do better in a gas engine truck. A gas 5.7hemi is rated at 10,000 lbs. not many people need more than that. 

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25/06
On 4/21/2018 at 1:22 PM, Flush said:

 

I'm sure it is real, the Ram 1500 diesel is at 27mpg currently.

The Chevy Colorado diesel which is a mid size truck (but is pretty big) is at 30mpg currently.

 

This F150 diesel is interesting, and I'm glad it's an option, but I wonder how well it will sell (and how much it will cost?)

 

The current F150 gas (2.7 ecoboost) is rated at 26mpg highway so while 30mpg is impressive, this new diesel is only 15% better than the most efficient gas version.

 

 

I looked at buying a 3/4 ton option hard before getting a 14 F150 3.5 eco.

My truck has 3.73 axle 4wd crew cab and it consistently gets 17-19mpg empty on South Dakota 80mph highways

When I drive in Minnesota 55-65 mph highways mileage  19-22pmg empty.

 

All gas motors do pretty good empty but hook up a small trailer trailer and your mileage will drop substantially.

 

I have a 15 Ram 2500 for work set up pretty close to my personal F150. They get pretty close to the same mileage empty. But I have an enclosed trailer that weighs less than

5000lb but is very tall and catches a lot of wind. When I pull trailer with F150 I get about 10-11mpg with the Ram 2500 mileage drops 1-2mpg.

 

That is the nature of these new gas motors.

 

For diesels the EPA has has mandated emission requirements that require so many sensors and so much peripheral equipment to run properly that they cost a lot to operate. Last week I had to have a new DEF pump installed because the DEF freezes in the cold weather. 90,000 miles and an $1800 repair would be hard to swallow if I owned the rig and was still making payments. Company has 10 of these trucks and I have not heard of one issue with the motors and transmissions themselves. Every time you take a truck in to clear some code or replace some sensor it is a $2-300 bill.

 

Bottom line if the 1/2 ton diesel had emission controls like 1997 and EPA was not trying to kill all diesel motor with crazy standards. It would be as rare to see a gas motor in a pickup as it is to see a diesel in a 1/2 ton now. Unless technology changes or the EPA standards are relaxed I do not see any economy in a 1/2 ton diesel.

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Curt

Just something to contemplate.  The fuel/mileage issue is only one difference between gas and diesel trucks and it's the small one.  It costs much more to keep and maintain a diesel truck than any gas truck regardless of MPG.  Service, parts, regular maintenance, will all be considerably higher with the diesel engine over the life of the truck.  I can give examples if anyone is interested.

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dogrunner
On 4/21/2018 at 7:04 AM, Dogwood said:

$?

 

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25/06

For the money this article is talking about the competition for the F150 Diesel will not be the 3.5 eco. It will be the xlt super duty 3/4 ton diesel.

 

15 hours ago, dogrunner said:

 

71BEF195-D03E-46F1-BD1F-BDDB780AB696.jpeg

 

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dogrunner

Well I think there about 6 years to late with this setup. I talked to the top Ford truck guy years ago about a diesel in the 150 and he said there was not enough business for it and there answer was Ecoboost. So then Dodge came out with there’s. Now Ford finally brings there’s out but is only putting it in there most Expensive trucks not there Work trucks so that limits its sales even more. I’ll stick with the 5.0 as long as they keep making it. 

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Chukarman

With the EPA constantly raising the bar it is a difficult time for vehicle makers.

 

Towing and hauling is the test. My 2001 F350 crew cab with 7.3 turbodiesel (4WD, 3.73 diffs) gets about 19 MPG on the freeway with no load. Towing my fully loaded 24' Airstream it drops to about 12-13 MPG. My Ford Expedition (5.4 gasser) got about 17 MPG unladen, but dropped to 8-9 MPG towing the same trailer over the same routes. I think the difference between the gas and diesel engines is still very similar.

 

Since I mainly use my truck when towing my travel trailer of my boat the difference - despite the difference in the cost of the two fuels - is still significant.

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