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Dogwood

Ford Turbocharger longevity?

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Dogwood

What's the longevity of these things and if they croak a rough cost to replace.  I'm looking at a 2015 Expedition with the 3.5 L.  Thanks.

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terrym

My mechanic told me most turbo replacements are @$4k

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25/06

If you are speaking specifically of the Fords Eco-boost. I know of a precision equipment installer that traded two off @ 140K without any issues and One that was used as a company delivery rig for the company across the street that is pushing 240K without issues. I do not see the longevity any different than diesel turbos. Semi diesels went from needing a turbo every 200,000 to having turbos last a million miles.

 

In past years turbos always had a better reputation in diesels than gas motors. That was mainly due to heat. Diesel had a better fuel delivery and a much more efficient combustion. Engineers have fundamentally changed how they manage the delivery of fuel and ignition in gas motors. The days of burning fuel in the exhaust system are gone. In days of carburetors and mechanical driven ignitions systems, the cylinder walls were washed in fuel when it was cold. In severe cold it was not unusual to have and extra pint in the oil pan when you changed oil after cold weather. What extra fuel did not make it past the rings into the oil was pushed into the exhaust and burned there. Poor fuel and ignition timing meant exhaust temps varied radically and was on average much higher than today. Diesels underwent some improvement as well and the service life really went up on them as well due to fuel management.

 

Turbos always held promise but until exhaust temps in gas motors were brought under control they proved to be short lived and expensive to operate. GM tried to go big in turbos in the 80's and it proved to be a problem. My brother had a Buick Regal GNX, which in the 80's was pretty fast for a production car.  It ate turbos, waste gates and inter-coolers at a pace the dealer was not willing to replace them at.

 

I do not think the turbos are fundamentally better but they last a long time now. I would not be afraid to buy a turbo vehicle gas or diesel now days. It is funny how people seem to forget every modern diesel pickup has a turbo and they expect 400,000 miles out of them.

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Clueless1

Better be a long time.  A few months ago I bought a 2014 F150 with the 3.5L Eco-boost and I will push that d*** thing if I have to to get 200,000 out of it.  I'm actually hoping for 300k. 

I know a guy that does quite a bit of OEM work for Ford and I asked him about it prior to buying it.  His response "Ford is all in on it.  Those guys love it."  I also know of a few that have passed 200k without issue.

   

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Dogwood

Yes great info thanks.  Yes should have mentioned it is a gas engine.

 

Ouch $4k for a turbocharger???

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25/06
8 hours ago, Clueless1 said:

Better be a long time.  A few months ago I bought a 2014 F150 with the 3.5L Eco-boost and I will push that d*** thing if I have to to get 200,000 out of it.  I'm actually hoping for 300k. 

I know a guy that does quite a bit of OEM work for Ford and I asked him about it prior to buying it.  His response "Ford is all in on it.  Those guys love it."  I also know of a few that have passed 200k without issue.

   

I would not worry about turbos. Check with a big local wrecking yard and they will be covered up in ford turbos as a used parts. If they are going out with any frequency they will not have any in stock or want an arm and a leg for a used one.

 

One known issue I will pass onto you that may save you a few dollars is throttle position sensor.

I have a 2014 as well and at about 40,000 miles the truck throws up a big wrench sign and the truck is running but seemed like it died. If you push the throttle nothing happens the engine just idles. I shut it off and restarted it and it worked fine. I went to a Ford shop where I was at and it does not show a problem or any code... It happened one more time on the way home. I took it into the local shop and they "diagnosed" it for about 4 hours and said there was not a code so they could not do anything but charged me for diagnosis. In the meantime I looked up throttle position sensor on the interweb and it turns out this is a common problem.

 

The throttle position sensor loses signal and just lets the truck idle. When you restart it it works fine eventually thou it will quit working all together.  The warranty does not cover work unless there is a code but the computer automatically eliminates the code as soon as you restart the truck. 

 

So dealers get the same issue in over and over they get to bill for diagnosis looking for an issue they already know what is wrong. If you want to do work under warranty you would need to drive it until it leaves you stranded!

 

The craziest thing about the whole deal..... The whole throttle body OEM part cost $169 dollars and it is a do it yourself install if there ever was one! If you do have this happen just buy the part and install it yourself. Having said that your dealer might be better than mine. I like my truck but not my local dealer. Once you fix it the problem does not seem happen again.

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dogrunner

That 3.5 motor has been in production since 09 and in the F150 since 2011, so there are many on the road. I had an 11, it is a nice powerful motor that doesn't downshift as much as the 5.0 going up hills or in heavy wind.  I got rid of it at about 39,000 and have had 3, 5.0  since. But have had a 3.5  in a 2015 Taurus SHO and right now I have a 3.0 turbo in my Hot Rod Lincoln. :D  No problems with any of them.  Turbo motors run extremely hot and once turned off hold heat longer so I use good synthetic oil. 

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Clueless1
21 hours ago, 25/06 said:

I would not worry about turbos. Check with a big local wrecking yard and they will be covered up in ford turbos as a used parts. If they are going out with any frequency they will not have any in stock or want an arm and a leg for a used one.

 

One known issue I will pass onto you that may save you a few dollars is throttle position sensor.

I have a 2014 as well and at about 40,000 miles the truck throws up a big wrench sign and the truck is running but seemed like it died. If you push the throttle nothing happens the engine just idles. I shut it off and restarted it and it worked fine. I went to a Ford shop where I was at and it does not show a problem or any code... It happened one more time on the way home. I took it into the local shop and they "diagnosed" it for about 4 hours and said there was not a code so they could not do anything but charged me for diagnosis. In the meantime I looked up throttle position sensor on the interweb and it turns out this is a common problem.

 

The throttle position sensor loses signal and just lets the truck idle. When you restart it it works fine eventually thou it will quit working all together.  The warranty does not cover work unless there is a code but the computer automatically eliminates the code as soon as you restart the truck. 

 

So dealers get the same issue in over and over they get to bill for diagnosis looking for an issue they already know what is wrong. If you want to do work under warranty you would need to drive it until it leaves you stranded!

 

The craziest thing about the whole deal..... The whole throttle body OEM part cost $169 dollars and it is a do it yourself install if there ever was one! If you do have this happen just buy the part and install it yourself. Having said that your dealer might be better than mine. I like my truck but not my local dealer. Once you fix it the problem does not seem happen again.

 

That could already explain just a little 'hiccup' I feel every now and then.  I have a great local guy that does most of the work on my cars.  I will ask him about it. 

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jeff88

About 3 years ago a good friend did not go with the Ford 3.5 eco-boost and instead bought a Tundra v-8.  They tow a horse trailer with upwards of 4 horses at a time and he had heard the eco-boost wasn't great with heavy towing.  From what I'm reading here, that does not seem to be the case.  

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Flush
On 4/24/2018 at 10:03 AM, Dogwood said:

Yes great info thanks.  Yes should have mentioned it is a gas engine.

 

Ouch $4k for a turbocharger???

 

I suspect that is the price, including all labor to replace both turbos (there are 2 on the 2.7 and 3.5 ecoboost of course), probably with OEM turbos. Or at least I hope that is the case for that price.

 

Just the turbos themselves aren't that much. I just checked on Rockauto and they list several different suppliers of aftermarket rebuilt and new turbos for the F150 and they range from $350 to $850 each.

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Flush
13 minutes ago, jeff88 said:

About 3 years ago a good friend did not go with the Ford 3.5 eco-boost and instead bought a Tundra v-8.  They tow a horse trailer with upwards of 4 horses at a time and he had heard the eco-boost wasn't great with heavy towing.  From what I'm reading here, that does not seem to be the case.  

 

My personal experience is very limited but everyone I know with the 3.5 eco-boost is very impressed with the towing capability. The only complaints revolve around fuel economy when towing, but that is true of any gas motor. The 3.5 eco-boost actually has a good bit more torque than the Toyota V8, although it may not "feel" like it by the seat of your pants when driving an empty truck. I know people who tow horses (happily) with the eco-boost.

 

I will say this though, if I was towing upwards of 4 horses routinely, I wouldn't want either a V8 Tundra, or an F150, I'd want something in the 3/4 ton class or bigger but not so much because of power but all the other aspects of handling that much weight.

 

 

 

 

 

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dogrunner
1 hour ago, jeff88 said:

About 3 years ago a good friend did not go with the Ford 3.5 eco-boost and instead bought a Tundra v-8.  They tow a horse trailer with upwards of 4 horses at a time and he had heard the eco-boost wasn't great with heavy towing.  From what I'm reading here, that does not seem to be the case.  

A buddy’s father pulls a big travel trailer to Alabama every fall to live in for the winter. The first couple years he used a Ram with a hemi. The next spring he was telling me it didn’t handle pulling through the Mts very good. I let him drive my Ecoboost truck he liked it, so he tried one. Next spring he told me it was much better than the Ram. My buddy called last night to tell me his turkey story and also to tell me his dad just leased his 3rd F150 with an Ecoboost. Guess he likes them. 😆.  

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dogrunner

These little fans create lots of power when needed. 

40385839-4A65-4EA8-8EB5-FB57549EA1B5.jpeg

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67diesel

3.5L uses a Borg Warner turbo.  They are the best turbos made, hands down. 

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jeff88
16 hours ago, dogrunner said:

A buddy’s father pulls a big travel trailer to Alabama every fall to live in for the winter. The first couple years he used a Ram with a hemi. The next spring he was telling me it didn’t handle pulling through the Mts very good. I let him drive my Ecoboost truck he liked it, so he tried one. Next spring he told me it was much better than the Ram. My buddy called last night to tell me his turkey story and also to tell me his dad just leased his 3rd F150 with an Ecoboost. Guess he likes them. 😆.  

At the time my buddy was looking I mentioned to him what I had been reading about the Ford 3.5 turbo but he was concerned about a 6 versus an 8 for towing.  Guess that can be a bit of a hard sell to traditional thinking.  Looks like from these posts he would have been fine but there wasn't much experience to share.  He was also looking at the F250 and 350 but settled on the Tundra.  We did have fun test driving them.  Pick-up truck test drives are tough - how do you replicate what the thing will be used for?  Guess that's why it might be hard to change traditional thinking such as a turbo 6 can out perform a large bore 8.  Ford seems to be on the right side of the argument.  In the cars world, many manufacturers have moved from 6's to turbo 4's in performance cars and gained in handling and economy w/o losing performance.  No reason that shouldn't apply to trucks.

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