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FRIENDLY REMINDER ABOUT HUNTING REPORTS/TOPICS... Read more... ×
SelbyLowndes

Any Frankophiles here?

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Cooter Brown

I forgot to mention in my previous post how much I like their fries and toast.

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Larry Brown

Not to mention their kisses . . . for which they don't claim credit. :)

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Larry Brown
1 hour ago, Mike Connally said:

I picked up this little 16 ga French guild gun about 15 years ago. I had it opened to .000 and .010. It made a very nice close quarters bird gun. 

F4E38533-07C3-492A-8B1E-A8BFEF6D8BDD.jpeg

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That very shallow round knob grip is very typically French.

 

And I give them credit for perhaps the most unique shotgun ad of all time.  Verney-Carron's 1922 catalog features a full page photo of WWI ace (and surviving ace of aces from both sides of that conflict, with 75 kills) Captain Rene Fonck.  Across his photo, Fonck has inscribed:

 

"I am very pleased with your Verney-Carron Helice Grip shotgun.  The  birds fall like Krauts!"  Underneath which V-C refers to Fonck as "a great hunter of men with his machinegun".

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Cooter Brown
1 hour ago, Larry Brown said:

Not to mention their kisses . . . for which they don't claim credit. :)

I credit one of their drains with keeping my basement dry.

 

A very clever people indeed.

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Chukarman

Darne is the Citroen of shotguns.

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Cooter Brown
5 hours ago, Chukarman said:

Darne is the Citroen of shotguns.

Years ago a girlfriend of mine had a Citroen.  It was similar to a Darne in that I wanted to shoot it.

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Bloodhound

One of my early bird hunting contact/old man had a Darne.  He said it was a great gun and that he was proud to own and hunt with it.  But all I ever saw him carry in the field was a Winchester model 12 16ga.

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lee sykes

I read an article once about Granger  guns.  From the photos,  they looked quite impressive. 

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Dave in Maine

When they put local wood on what was made to be, for most intents and purposes, a farmer's gun you get something special. (Kinda like world-class meals from a farm kitchen's stove.)  Like with mine, which came out of a Norman barn in '44.

 

100_0630.jpg

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ruffed1

I picked up a project gun a few years ago.  It is either a Darne 16 ga or a copy of one.  It was a high end gun when it was made.  I’ve never gotten around to getting it restored.  It can be shot as is but, I never have.  It has a small dent in one barrel and a cracked stock which has been repaired.  This thread is making me thing I should get it worked on.  It is a cool gun and one heck of a light gun. 

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airmedic1

I recently bought a Manufrance Robust 16 from the 1930's.  Its light and seems to be overbuilt with thick barrels and very tight chokes.  The sling built in to the stock is cool and I plan to take it out after wild pheasant this fall.  If I like it I will have the chokes opened up to something a little more handy than full and even fuller!  I like the looks of the Ideal's but don't think I could ever get used to that safety.

AM

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Larry Brown

In terms of numbers produced, the Robust is sort of the Stevens 311 of France.  But a much nicer gun.  The French seem to be able to make light guns with relatively thick barrels.  But for upland hunting purposes, quite a few of them need "thinning" at the muzzle because they have a whole lot of choke--like airmedic's gun.

 

I've only owned one Ideal, and I could not get used to the bass-ackwards safety.  (Forward is on; back is off.)

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quailguy
On 6/19/2018 at 11:05 AM, Larry Brown said:

My "work car" in Morocco was a Renault R-4--a model never imported here.  It was maybe a step or 2 above the infamous "Deux Chevaux" Citroen--like the little truck Peter Sellers drove in at least one of the "Pink Panther" movies.  But very reliable.

  My 1st week in a large German city a number of years ago I was a witness (helluva thing to be) to a car crash involving a Deux Chevaux and a Volkswagen. The Deux Chevaux literally fell apart: 3 fenders fell off. I never laughed so hard at a car crash before or since.

  Which was a good thing, no one picked me out as a witness because I was rolling around on the ground lol.

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OldColonel
14 hours ago, Larry Brown said:

In terms of numbers produced, the Robust is sort of the Stevens 311 of France.  But a much nicer gun.  The French seem to be able to make light guns with relatively thick barrels.  But for upland hunting purposes, quite a few of them need "thinning" at the muzzle because they have a whole lot of choke--like airmedic's gun.

 

I've only owned one Ideal, and I could not get used to the bass-ackwards safety.  (Forward is on; back is off.)

 

I just picked up an Ideal 340 in 16ga.  It is a beautiful gun in appearance, balance, and weight, a real joy to mount.  I have not shot it yet so I guess I have a learning curve on the safety.

 

i agree with you on wall thickness, for such a light gun(6lbs) it has Great Wall thickness.  If I ever finish my house painting project I will get to shot it.  However week three of taking a 100 yr old house back to wood then prime and paint is not halfway done yet.

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Dave in Maine
14 hours ago, OldColonel said:

 

  .....If I ever finish my house painting project I will get to shot it.  However week three of taking a 100 yr old house back to wood then prime and paint is not halfway done yet.

One of my neighbors spent an entire summer on that kind of project.  Stripping, sanding, putty, prime, paint, one wall at a time.

OTOH, he had summer of domestic tranquility seeing as how he was out from underfoot around the house.

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