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fourtrax57

Bird Hunting Rig Lite ... Question for the collective..

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fourtrax57

     Will phase out the suburban for the subaru outback (used & just purchased).

 

Already have the 3/4 ton HD Chev and a camper for long trips. The Suburban has 220 + Kmiles on it.

Decided it was time for something more modern & perhaps more economical.

     Have never owned or been around a Subaru before. It is an AWD with the V4 engine. Know zippo about them other than most Subaru owners I have spoken with def. like their

units. Loyal customer following says something good about them I hope.

 

Question for the group here...........:  Can a rig like this tow anything like a small boat & trailer, or even a 4 hole dog trailer (800 lbs & little hitch wt.)??

It drives very nice down the road & has some extra ground clearance compared to most cars.

 

PIC BURB 7-2018.jpg

PIC Subie 7-2018.jpg

White trk 7-2018.jpg

PICcamper 7-2018.jpg

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Greg Hartman

Nice, ride!  I have no idea, but I'll bet the Subaru owner's manual will tell you exactly how much it can two, plus max hitch weight, etc.  My experience with towing is: bigger/more powerful is better when it comes to tow vehicles, but that doesn't mean you can't tow light stuff with a small vehicle.

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fourtrax57
43 minutes ago, Greg Hartman said:

Nice, ride!  I have no idea, but I'll bet the Subaru owner's manual will tell you exactly how much it can two, plus max hitch weight, etc.  My experience with towing is: bigger/more powerful is better when it comes to tow vehicles, but that doesn't mean you can't tow light stuff with a small vehicle.

 

 

Will take a look!

Thanks Greg.

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Dave Quindt

To add to Greg's post, there are 2 things to consider.  First, is the engine/power train up to the task.  Second, are the brakes up to the task.  I'd recommend running the best set of pads and rotors you can.  Unfortunately, unlike trucks, there might not be heavy-duty upgrade products available. 

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Flush

Without knowing what year, engine, and trans etc it's impossible to say exactly how much it's rated to tow.

Most newer Outbacks ( yours appears to be pretty new) are rated to tow around 2,700 lbs BUT that is if the trailer has trailer brakes, I think the rating is 1,000lbs without brakes.

 

Bottom line is yes, they can tow relatively small trailers. Exactly how much, you will need to look up for your car. I used to occasionally tow a small trailer with motorcycles with a Subaru, and it was fine. 

 

You will see a SIGNIFICANT hit to fuel economy if you are towing anything with any significant wind resistance (like a boat or bigger dog trailer). 

 

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fourtrax57

Flush,

     You are spot on regarding your numbers for towing.

 

 

 

 

It is a 2010 with a 2.4 L. (?) v4 engine and the 6 speed transmission (cvt).

 

Owner's manual quotes a max of 200 lbs hitch wt and 1000 lbs for a trailer w/o brakes, and 2700 lbs for a trailer with brakes.

I have towed the dog trailer with FWD cars like an accord easily. The trailer is low slung and balances out to maybe 30 - 40 lbs hitch wt. fully loaded.

The water tank in the back when full can balance out to near zero tongue wt. downward when full simply by placement of "stuff". Rig is lighter duty than I would have if it were the only vehicle for me. I didn't have a decent, modern economy vehicle for travel since our camry dropped the oil pump this Spring and seized up tooling down the highway with only about 3 seconds warning. Repair was more than vehicle was worth so it went to the scrap yard.

     I will eventually have a hitch installed and I will also install a transmission oil cooler in the front. I do this on all the units I tow with if not so equipped. 

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jackh

I bought a 2018 Forester (actually, I found it and my wife closed the deal with the dealer because I was still overseas) in Jan.  I conducted EXTENSIVE research and did a great deal of comparing with other crossover SUVs; bought it for a daily driver and for a traveling hunting rig.  It has a 2.4L engine and the CVT.

I replaced the the stock tires with a slightly larger AT tires.  I also put an aftermarket skid plate on it to replace the plastic one.  I'm gonna finish it off with a 1.5" lift later this month and then try to wear it out over the next 6-10 years :-)

 

So far, I've put 10K on it (I usually put right at 20K a year on rigs).  I absolutely love it and have no regrets.  Averaging 28 mpg hwy and about 24 mpg city.  My actual combined mpg over the 10K is 26.  

 

The only thing I have pulled with it is a 5x8 utility trailer with some stuff on it (no wind resistance); it pulled it just fine in our flint hills and knocked my mpg about 3 mpg hwy.  It certainly is not a stellar "trailer puller", but I did not get it for that.

 

I'm heading to Platoro, CO in a few weeks for my annual trout fishing fix and I'm certain it will perform great there as well.  My daughter and I will be taking it to Saskatchewan in Sept for my semi-annual upland/waterfowl foray.

 

My wife had a 2014 Outback and I really liked that vehicle, but she wanted something more sporty.  I took it to Platoro in 2015, loaded down with my outfitter tent and all the camping supplies.  No issues at all and 26 mpg.  I should have kept the Outback, but I had a Jeep JKU at the time that I didn't want to part with...

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airmedic1

We are on our third Subaru Outback.  We had a 2010 and loved it, a 2013 that was a POS lemon and now a 2017.  The 2010 was a rockstar, got 35 mpg on the highway and only got rid of it because the dealer offered such a good deal to trade for the 2013.  That 2013 car had the shift points messed up and would not stay in 6th gear at highway speeds.  It always shifted down to 5th and consequently the mileage sucked.  Usually around 17-19 on the highway.  We traded that one for the 2017 and it is great, just like the 2010. The 2017 gets 30+ on the highway and drives great.

The 2013 used oil at 40,000 miles but the 2010 and the 2017 don;t use any so I guess it was really a lemon.

I think your 2010 would pull a 700 lb trailer without difficulty if you weren't in a big hurry and wanted to drive 80.  There is some info out there about head gasket issues but we have traded ours off before we experienced any issues like that.

We fold the rear seat down and carry six dogs and a bunch of stuff out to our cabin.  Overall, if you exclude the crappy mileage and oil burning of the 2013 we have had no problems with ours.  I change oil at 6000 miles and have replaced the serpentine belt but other than that have done nothing other than routine maintenance like rotating tires every 6000 miles.

AM

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25/06
On 7/6/2018 at 7:12 AM, fourtrax57 said:

Flush,

     You are spot on regarding your numbers for towing.

 

 

 

 

It is a 2010 with a 2.4 L. (?) v4 engine and the 6 speed transmission (cvt).

 

Owner's manual quotes a max of 200 lbs hitch wt and 1000 lbs for a trailer w/o brakes, and 2700 lbs for a trailer with brakes.

I have towed the dog trailer with FWD cars like an accord easily. The trailer is low slung and balances out to maybe 30 - 40 lbs hitch wt. fully loaded.

The water tank in the back when full can balance out to near zero tongue wt. downward when full simply by placement of "stuff". Rig is lighter duty than I would have if it were the only vehicle for me. I didn't have a decent, modern economy vehicle for travel since our camry dropped the oil pump this Spring and seized up tooling down the highway with only about 3 seconds warning. Repair was more than vehicle was worth so it went to the scrap yard.

     I will eventually have a hitch installed and I will also install a transmission oil cooler in the front. I do this on all the units I tow with if not so equipped. 

 

Absolutely do not do this!

 

I am assuming this is simply written incorrectly but running even a small trailer without adequate tongue weight is dangerous and at highway speeds will cause you to crash!

 

A rule of thumb is 10%-12% of Trailers total weight on tongue as a minimum. Once you have this, drive and adjust to make trailer behave.

 

This rule is for all vehicles and the repercussions for not following it are immediate as soon as the vehicle breaks 50-55mph. Sometimes the trailer wagging is so severe people are not able to get vehicle back below speed in time to recover from a wreck.

 

This does not matter if you are pulling a small trailer with a small vehicle or a relatively light trailer behind a heavy vehicle.

 

A good friend of mine's wife picked up some hay with a regular car trailer. The people loaded the trailer level and not that heavy. At interstate speed the trailer began to violently fishtail and took the whole trailer and truck into the ditch. This was a crew cab 3/4 ton Diesel pulling a 1600lb trailer with maybe 1000lb of hay. Car trailers are notoriously biased to pull front engined cars, so even loading the trailer fairly even caused a light tongue.

 

My Neighbor went to a landscape store and picked up patio pavers. The store loaded the trailer wrong and the whole works ended up in the ditch. This was a 1/2 ton with a two wheeled trailer and about 1500lbs of block. Not overloaded at all just loaded wrong.

 

Your car should be able to pull a small trailer  but make sure it is loaded properly. On a little car like yours add an aftermarket brake controller and proper wiring. It will make for an enjoyable safe pull. I do not enjoy pulling trailers without their own brakes.

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fourtrax57

25/06

 

Good heads up.

Thanks.

 

This Subaru even with being a 4 cyl. has a bit stiffer suspension than a regular FWD car. It can easily handle

100 lbs or less hitch (tongue) wt. The dog trailer is maybe 750 lbs total (wet). It barely depresses at all with me on the back bumper

at two hundred.

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Marc Ret

Heed 25/06s advice. I learned that lesson the hard way as a much younger man. I knew better but didn't listen to myself because my friend's father said it was fine. Figured he knew better since he was older...

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bamaquail

I had a cousin killed in this exact way. He was leaving to go elk hunting 16 hours away. He didn't have enough weight on the tongue. He got less than 5 miles from the house when the trailer started violently fishtailing. He wasn't wearing a seat belt and was thrown out the back window of the truck when it started flipping. 

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Chukarman

Always put the weight forward in a trailer. Your Subaru should have no problem with moderate trailer weights. And DO get a trailer with brakes. I have survived some ugly, iced up roads in the Rockies using just the trailer brakes to slow me down... this in my F350. Learn how to use the trailer brakes.

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FlyChamps

We towed this 1,400 pound (loaded) rig over 10K miles in 2009 with my 2004 Subaru Forester - from our home in Columbia, SC to Greenville, ME to Navajo Dam, NM to Key West, FL and many more trips in other years from 2007 until 2015.  The 2004 was replaced and now my wife has a 2013 Forester and I have a 2011 Forester.

 

No trailer brakes and never had any issues with stopping.  The 2004's were rated to pull 2000#, our 2011 and 2013 are rated for 2400# - the never Foresters with the CVT are rated for much less towing capacity.

 

Gas mileage dropped from the low 20's to the mid teens when towing but it pulled OK.  On long uphills like from Vail, CO to Denver I just pulled into the far right lane and ran 45MPH with the big rigs.  On the flat lands I ran 75 to 80mph and, yes, gas mileage sucked at 80mph.

2009-10-04 080.JPG

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25/06
11 hours ago, FlyChamps said:

We towed this 1,400 pound (loaded) rig over 10K miles in 2009 with my 2004 Subaru Forester - from our home in Columbia, SC to Greenville, ME to Navajo Dam, NM to Key West, FL and many more trips in other years from 2007 until 2015.  The 2004 was replaced and now my wife has a 2013 Forester and I have a 2011 Forester.

 

No trailer brakes and never had any issues with stopping.  The 2004's were rated to pull 2000#, our 2011 and 2013 are rated for 2400# - the never Foresters with the CVT are rated for much less towing capacity.

 

Gas mileage dropped from the low 20's to the mid teens when towing but it pulled OK.  On long uphills like from Vail, CO to Denver I just pulled into the far right lane and ran 45MPH with the big rigs.  On the flat lands I ran 75 to 80mph and, yes, gas mileage sucked at 80mph.

2009-10-04 080.JPG

What a cool setup!

Dog, Gun,shells and house on wheels. I could live in that from October- December!

If my wife came along that would need 3 axles 3 slides a fifth wheel with washer, dryer and stand up shower!

 

I have pulled a relatively light trailer ( 4000lb loaded) behind my 1/2 ton a lot without brakes out West and I live in South Dakota so I know it can be done and done safely.

Last couple of years the wife and I have been going to Florida and I have pulled my non trailer brake trailer. I did it without an incidents but I am

going to upgrade to brakes simply because Atlanta, Birmingham, Nashville and Daytona are all NASCAR towns!😂

 

Seriously though stop and go high speed traffic of the big towns is not fun! Still not fun with trailer brakes but better!

 

I am not one of the people that will tell you that you need a 3/4 ton diesel to pull a pop up tent.  I have a small aluminum open trailer (no brakes) I have pulled

4 wheelers, Motorcycles and an 1100lb mower with a small 4cylinder ranger or a Ford Taurus with out a bit of problems. A nice 4 hole dog trailer behind your car seems like a nice economical rig. If the owners manual says 200lb of tongue weight I would go with that without hesitation as they are usually conservative. I doubt a typical dog box would hit 2000lbs unless you are taking a lot of water (8.34lb per gallon)

 

Be safe

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