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Kansas Big Dog

If you feed grain-free or exotic dog food-must read

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stripersonfly

Thanks for the link.  Interesting article.  Not just the concern regarding boutique and grain-free diets, but also falling into the hype we often see on the web about pet foods now a days. I wanted to copy part of the article below.  It is from the first bullet under the "What should you do" section of the article. 

 

" And do yourself a favor –  stop reading the ingredient list!  Although this is the most common way owners select their pets’ food, it is the least reliable way to do so.  And be careful about currently available pet food rating websites that rank pet foods either on opinion or on based on myths and subjective information. It’s important to use more objective criteria (e.g., research, nutritional expertise, quality control in judging a pet food). The best way to select what is really the best food for your pet is to ensure the manufacturer has excellent nutritional expertise and rigorous quality control standards"

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rideold

Interesting.  I have been feeding the Diamond grain free because all the foods at the store that have grain in them are filled with refined grains rather than whole grains.  If the refined grains aren't good for me then they probably aren't good for my dog is what I figure.  I'm still searching for a grain based food that is made better than what I've seen.  Maybe it doesn't really matter.  The whole dog food decision is kind of overwhelming.  I'm hoping that I'll find one that has whole grains but no by-product meal.

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henryrski

Very interesting, but what do you feed if grains in the dog food cause skin allergies?

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Gyrfolco

Peanut must have been a pampered puppy.

 

If you want to see what a real study looks like look up Scott and Fuller's several year long study on canine genetic behavior from the 60's. Every book I've read on canine behavior cites that study because no one has ever attempted to indulge that deeply into it since. Until I see that type of study done on dog food's biological effect on dogs, I'll take every article with a bit of skepticism.. I've fed grain free food that costs twice as much as regular food, but I only had to feed half the quantity or less to my dogs to reach the same outcome. That equates to half the waste or less. And I didn't have the tartar build up on teeth like I've seen with the corn based foods. I feed it because of the high percentage of animal product used as protein, rather than vegetable.

 

 

 

Here's a couple of blood tests, do you think a veterinary nutritionist could tell you which dog is in better condition? Could they tell you which one is on a grain free diet??

 

 

 

Coppersbloodtest17mo.jpg

Ellie's blood test.jpg

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Kansas Big Dog
10 hours ago, Gyrfolco said:

I'll take every article with a bit of skepticism.

 

Obviously, you are not aware that this is from Tufts University outside Boston. Here is a little info on Tufts:

 

Cummings Veterinary Medical Center
at Tufts University

 

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University is the only veterinary school in New England. Our progressive academic programs, high-quality clinical care services, and original research has brought Tufts University national and worldwide acclaim. Comprised of our seven academic teaching hospitals and clinics Cummings Veterinary Medical Center.

 

http://vet.tufts.edu/

 

 

I would venture to say that Tufts research might be a little more updated than you 1960's era research.

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Chukarman

This is an interesting subject. There is no end of information, misinformation, speculation and outright falsehoods available on the Internet. 

 

Many people agonize over pet food choices. Some are constantly changing from one formulation to another. I have always fed Purina ProPlan and my dogs live long and healthy lives. That's about all I expect from a nutrition program. 

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Gyrfolco
1 hour ago, Kansas Big Dog said:

 

I would venture to say that Tufts research might be a little more updated than you 1960's era research.

 

Haha, that's a good one. You read the study https://www.amazon.com/Genetics-Social-Behavior-John-Scott/dp/0226743381#reader_0226743381 I referred to and come back. Has nothing to do with your posted article, but speaks volumes of what a real study is comprised of. You're good at searching the web so I have no doubt in your abilities to find an article that is contrary to this one from tufts. Key words Raw, sled dog energy, etc.

 

Chukarman is correct, I've seen dogs live their whole lives on Pro Plan and live to a very old age. I believe the biggest reason yours and those other dogs are living so long has more to do with how fit they are on a regular basis and genetics, than the kibble they're eating. But that's just my opinion. And, the fitness, or LACK of it is what likely caused the heart failing in most of the dogs this article.

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ryanr

"And do yourself a favor- stop reading the ingredients list." Uh no, you do that while I continue to read the ingredients list and inform myself on what's in the food I buy, for me and my dog.

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Kansas Big Dog

Hey, just like we free to hunt the kind of dogs we want, we are free to feed what kind of dog food we want. This is a well respected research university coming to a conclusion about what they are finding with their research, if you don't trust there research, who do you trust? If you feel you can trust a small Italian dog food company and what they claim about their food, go for it. There is no doubt I do think that they would say that Pro Plan would be a good food to feed. As would most main line dog foods fed in the US. 

 

Personally, I trust Tufts. I had a dog that needed a specialized type of surgery. I had to take my dog in for an examination to see if he could get the surgery. There were 2 students in shadowing the surgeon. One student was from Germany and one was from France. He did do the surgery and it was a success. It is not only well respected in the US, but also internationally. 

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BlacknTan

It is interesting, and I've agonized over dog food choices myself.

My Vet recommended only companies that have Veterinary Nutritionists on staff, so we've gone back to Pro Plan, and done quite well.. I'm just not qualified to judge on my own, what is the best feed for a canine.

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dogrunner

Good thing mine has some in it. 

4B91DE9C-6820-4A76-99AF-219E28A167FF.jpeg

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Dogwood

I can't think of ANY other consumer product that has such a powerful placebo and marketing force and effect on the consumer then pet foods.  "Grain free" is the current lead marketing mantra.  I take histories many times daily and always ask about the diet.  Majority of the time the first thing out of their mouths , even before the brand name (assuming they can even remember it, strangely), is "it's a grain free   . . . ".

 

Marketing, selling, and buying pet foods is about ingredients.  Proper nutrition is about NUTRIENTS.  Very different and the 2 are mutually exclusive. 

 

Purina, Hills, and Royal Canin do the lion's share of R & D to make excellent prescription diets, and that research carries over into the OTC non-rx diets they make.  Beyond that notion, it is impossible to comparatively judge nutritional quality by reading labels.  They simply don't provide the proper information to do so because it isn't mandated. 

 

I'll add that "Organic" still in vogue somewhat.  "Non-GMO"  on deck, as are "Probiotics".
 

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C.J.L.

The pet food industries first concern is marketing to get YOU to buy the dog food just like every other company wanting to sell stuff and secondly to make a dog food Ol Roy wants to eat.  They would use whole ground up old cars if dogs ate them.  Then it's low cost ingredients for high profit margined which is why most dogs are so fat. We humans get all the good meat wrapped in plastic at the grocery store so what's left for Fido? Lastly, adding a bunch of stuff to the dog food to give it a long shelf life. A short shelf life would raise cost and lower profit. Pet food, over all, is a nasty combination of yuck.  If humans ate it for every meal I'm convinced our average life expectancy would be cut in half and we would all end life by cancer of some type.  A dogs life is relatively short so the pet food companies don't have to give much concern to the additives and preservatives in the foods they make.  Processed food ain't good for no one or dogs........but my dogs still ain't getting my steak tonight. Good thing is dogs have litters and not one at a time.  

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RMH

I fretted over dog food. Tried to balance what seemed like good ingredients with what it cost and what was available locally. I figured the dogs were not going to eat better than my kids. Tried a few brands over the years. Then I got to thinking about it, my Dad had some beagles when I was a kid in the 60's. They were outside in a run or on a chain during the day, brought in the house in the evening for over night. They were fed Purina Dog Chow cradle to grave. We had a lot of old dogs and few vet visits. While I don't feed Dog Chow I think this subject is over thought a lot. I feed Purina One, I trust the company as far as any [worked for them at one time] and can get it when we go grocery shopping.

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