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Dick Sellers

Your worse perdicament - out in the field; not in a bar.

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Dick Sellers

Today happens to be the anniversary of a bad accident I had 27 years ago, which got me to thinking how lucky I was.  I'll replay that day later, but first let's hear some of yours.  Let's narrow it down to something that happened while you were out of your normal daily activities.

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topdog1961

Rabbit hunting solo about 5 miles from the house. County Land, very cold. About a foot of hard crusted snow, blown deeper in spots. You know the kind. You can walk over it with boots on, easy walking, but slick. I wasn't familiar with this area, only hunting it every couple years. Suddenly I fell through up to my shoulders, only then realizing I was over a water filled drainage ditch. Thankfully my feet touched and stopped the decent.  But ice cold water was up to my belly button. My cell phone didn't get ruined because they weren't even thought of then. Only my arms, shoulders, head and my club of a shotgun, a Mossberg 835, big ugly and black, were above the crusty snow. No one lived within a mile of me, so yelling for help was of no use. I tried to pull myself out with my arms but couldn't get any grip on the snow. After several minutes of trying unsuccessfully, I was getting hypothermic. I decided it was the gun or me. I slammed the stock as hard as I could into the frozen snow. After a couple tries it broke through. Using it as a anchor, I pulled myself out and stumbled to the truck. It never fazed that brute of a gun. I couldn't do that at my current age and weight. 

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grouse28

Flintlock hunting in PA’s coal country in January, some snow on the ground. Hunting in some thick laurel and came across a 3’ puddle, too far to jump so I stepped into it as there were leaves laying on the “bottom”. Stepped in and went down into orange-yellow acid mine drainage. Kept going and caught my foot on a rock or something on the side, threw my gun ahead and lunged, was in to my waist.

Had no idea how deep it was, but I think it was an air shaft into a mine. Two mile walk to the truck, clothes frozen solid. Stripped down and drove home in yellow underwear. If today I would be at the bottom of that shaft, no trace.

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WPG Gizmo

Back in the 80's while at a Marine base in NC I was out deer hunting with another Marine on the base it was Buckshot only we are walking across a field that had a large wind row of scrub pines in the middle as we got closer to the pines a group of deer got up out of the grass where they were bedding.  They were fairly close to us well within range of buckshot running parallel to the pines.  We started shooting at the running deer it was then that I heard the most heart stopping sound a loud yell from the other side of the trees.  There were 2 hunters over there dressed in camo with no blaze which was a requirement to hunt on the base.  Had they been wearing Blaze we would have clearly seen them and not shot at the running deer.  As it is no one got hurt but that was the closest I have ever come to unintentionally shooting someone.  Someone had a angel on their shoulder that day for sure.

 

The other time also happened in NC at the same base I was out deer hunting with a buddy and we came into a live fire 40MM range impact zone  that was full of unexplored ordnance we had no idea that we were in there there were no signs marking the area like on other ranges.  Spread all across the ground was live HE and Frag grenades that failed to go off for some reason.  After we realized where we were a very slow and deliberate walk out the area was taken I know how it must have felt to walk into a mine field.

 

Since then my times in the woods have been mostly uneventful thank god

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Remo

Yep, through the ice. I was pheasant hunting in December and crossed a slough. Went through but was able to hold myself up by throwing my arms out. Scissor kicked out like a seal, flat on the ice pushing the gun ahead. I had so much adrenaline from fright that I think I would have climbed over my best friends head to get out of that ice water. I too have to believe in Guardian Angels.

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MUSTANGER7

I was hunting elk in the Buffalo Peaks area of Colorado and I ran into a friend who was there with a couple of his buddies. I was hunting off my horse Comanche while they were afoot. On about the second day with them one of them shot a medium size bull, my friend asked me if I would pack it out with my horse, so I agreed that after I had hunted in morning hours I would met them and haul it out. I had taken out two quarters and returned for the last two, it was about five miles in and by the time I got the last two quarters loaded it was late in the afternoon. Comanche and I (I was on foot leading him) we went into an area on the north slope that had melted in the sun but as the sun went down it had refroze. I was just in front of him when his feet it a slick patch of ice and he went down and started sliding down the slope toward a cliff of about 50ft high, I was going with him after about 30 ft on his side sliding he stopped when he slide into a two inch or so tree that luckily ended up in the middle of his belly. He as a really great trail horse, I could shoot off him etc he'd do anything. We were about 15 ft from the cliff, I was able to calm him down and then using my K-Bar knife I roughed up the  area around him and made a sort of path out of the area. I had unload the elk quarters so it would be easier for him to get on his feet. I had taught him to hand jump on the command hup, when I said that he got to his feet and  we then made our way off the side of the slope. I tied him to a tree while I hauled the elk to where he was, reloaded them and off we went in the dark.

 

He was one great horse, to show how solid he was a second incident was when I had tied him off while I went over the hill crest to glass for mule deer, it got dark while I was walking back to him. I knew where he was as I had tied him at the crossing of two trails. I got to the intersection and started walking in circles as a search pattern, I called him but he never said a word, finally after about 30 min I bumped into him, pretty sure he though I was crazy. Later on during that hunt I shot a really big muley with a 36in spread above tree line, I had field dressed him when blizzard moved in, since we had crossed some really bad cliffy area I was concerned that with the new snow of about 15in and it being dark I would not be able to make out any definition in the snow and walk off a cliff. Decided to spend the night on the mountain, so we went down into some some Juniper's, pulled my emergency blanket over us and slept on his back. Longest night of my life, in the morning when I got us and the deer down the truck radio said it was 20 below a 9500 and I was around 10,500.

 

Lastly I fox hunted of him for 15 yrs, once when the hunt was at Ft Riley, KS for a hunt I went back to the truck to check on our youngest daughter who was with some adults but her mother was worried. The hunt was about 3 or 4 miles away, I could tell about where they were because I could hear the huntsman blowing the horn to keep control of the hounds. Comanche was a a fast canter when we crested a small rise and I saw that we were right in the middle of a horseshoe shaped Army concentina wire (terrible stuff) and we were to close and to fast to stop or turn, I told him hup and he jumper on the hup and over we went, it was about 4ft high. 

 

He did it all

 

 

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greg jacobs

Was riding with a friend in an old flat fender. There was a tow bar on the front tipped back. The winshield was clipped down on the hood. It was dusk. We were coming down a little private road out of the sagebrush. Been down it hundreds of times. All of a sudden from out of the dusk we saw it. A cable was stretched across the road. Way to late to stop. We hit the cable. The windshield came flying towards us. Turned and took the shot from the windshield on the shoulder and the side of the head. Then we jerked to a stop.

The cable had climbed up the tow bar, slid under the windshield flipped it up and ripped it off. The windshield and cable bounced off of us and went over our heads. The windshield ended up behind us. The cable hooked the spare tire and jerked us to a stop. How that cable got over our heads was a miracle. Should have hit us in the chest and climbed up to our necks. Took a hand from above to survive that one.

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Hub

I hiked in 2 miles in fairly deep snow to bowhunt an area in late December in Wisconsin.  It started out wet and snowing and then the temp dropped 20 degrees.  I sat past my shivering waiting on dusk and a big buck, then it occurred to me why I wasn't shivering any more.  The minute I stood up off the stool I knew I was in trouble.  My legs were almost gone and I hadn't even started walking.  The only smart thing I did that day was leave all my gear hanging in a tree.  I made it back, but just barely.  This was before cell phones, nobody knew I was out and no one was expecting me back.  I have been pretty lucky to outlive all the bad situations I have put myself in.  Tracking wounded bears, riding ice flows, bridge jumping, hiking the Badlands without a drop of water.  Sitting on a little stool on a December evening in Wisconsin was as close as I have come to not coming home.

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406dn

I suspect we have all had an incident that could have been the end. The closet I have come occurred while elk hunting.

 

I was hunting way back in a mountain range accessed on a network of logging roads. That night while getting off the mountain, I came to a long straight stretch that was not real steep but very icy. I thought my speed was slow enough, but when I tapped the brakes, I realized the Blazer had become a sled. Maybe 150-200 yards the road made a sharp left turn. If you miss the turn,, its off the side of the mountain. The whole way down, I was frantically pumping the brake. It was not helping. 

 

As the turn arrived I spun the steering wheel to the left,,, the outside of the turn had some snow that had not been driven on and packed down and glazed. The wheels grabbed and I shot to the left and was now staring at a sizable tree. I spun the steering wheel to the right,,,, the Blazer straightened out and I was now on a much less steep stretch going down the middle of the road. 

 

I did not think it was going to end well.

 

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Fishnfowler

This is a recurrent topic, and I've told this story before, but there are new people here, so I'll tell it again.  30 years ago, I was hunting mule deer high in the Selkirks of N. Idaho.  I thought I hit a very large buck, but couldn't find a drop of blood or the arrow.  My headlamp died and I left for the night.  Early in the AM I returned with my spouse.  We were 4 miles from the rig and 8 miles up a 2-track from the road.  I found my arrow perfectly centered in a branch that stuck up and must have been in front of the deer.  My wife was up the hill on a stump catching some early morning rays while I looked around.  When she came down to me, I discovered she had dropped several arrows from my quiver.  I followed her tracks in the frost up the clearcut and managed to fall on a broadhead which entered my groin and cut my femoral artery.  I tried to remove the arrow, but it was hung up on the back of the broadhead.  I stuck my finger in along the shaft and freed up the three blades of the snuffer.  When it came out, blood sprayed as if from a garden hose about 15 feet with every heart beat.  I tried to stop it with direct pressure, but it was spraying out with a hiss no matter how hard I pushed.  I told my wife that I was dying and to go for help.  At this time I had 10 years of ER experience and was pretty savvy about my chances.  She ran off and I got to work with a tourniquet.  I managed to staunch the flow and several hours later a helicopter showed up.  I lost about 2/3 of my blood and was pretty pale for several months. There are more details, but I saved my life and my leg.  There is a hell of a pucker in my leg and a hitch in my get-a-long, but I'm here to tell the tale.   My advice is to let lost arrows lay. 

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Brad Eden

You guys win. I did jump off the loft of a barn when a kid and landed on a coffee can that about severed my heel. I fell about 100 feet from a treehouse when a pine branch broke, but the other branches softened my fall and I landed with a thump, but no worse for wear. I've had a pack of coyotes escort me to my truck while walking back in the dark from a bowstand. I had a pumpkin head black bear walk to the base of my 12 foot high ladder stand, put a paw on the bottom rung and look up at me while bowhunting. Pucker. I've been "turned around" plenty of times but never have had to spend a night in the woods. I did ridiculously stupid things when a teenager, like drinking and driving 150 mph in a friends Challenger muscle car. I've done a couple static line parachute jumps using army surplus gear and canopies. I married a fiery 100% Portuguese woman....but I can't come close to most of the above.

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Mike da Carpenter

I once told my wife that every year I was going to go hunting out of state for two weeks.

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RuffChaser

Nothing in the field. I've done more stupid things than most but I've never been too risky in the field. I had a 4-5 year run where I think I had a monopoly on doing stupid #$@*! but that never involved hunting or fishing. The 30 year anniversary of one of my more stupid acts is coming up in a few months. I'll elaborate about that then.

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steveziv

Launching my duck boat on an ice covered ramp I ended up backed down so far my exhaust pipe was nearly underwater.  Rear wheels were on wet concrete but the front (drive) wheels were on the ice above.  I had to find sand and gravel nearby and start hauling it.

 

I was duck hunting on a point and there were hunters on an island maybe a 1/4 mile away.  Their boat got loose, drifted by us and into a cove.  I figured I'd retrieve their boat for them and started walking a straight line to it across some flats.  I ended up about waist deep in mud.  It was scary and exhausting extricating myself.  I managed to get out without plunging my shotgun into the mud for support.

 

I always say duck hunting is expensive, inconvenient, uncomfortable and dangerous.  But when its good, man, there's nothing like it.

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steveziv
8 hours ago, Fishnfowler said:

 There is a hell of a pucker in my leg and a hitch in my get-a-long, but I'm here to tell the tale.   My advice is to let lost arrows lay. 

 

I got a hell of a "pucker" about midway through your story.

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