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BlacknTan

Photo Equipment

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BlacknTan

I used to love National Geographic in film days. The photos were always superb, and the details of the equipment were usually listed. I miss those days..

 

I know there are some talented photographers here, and I always envy these photos. I'm also aware that the best equipment in the world will not add me to your ranks.. And, I'm OK with that, but I want to do the best I can.

So, short of returning to the film days at Nat Geo, can you gents list your preferred equipment and any details you find pertinent? For an upstart that does not want to make any more pricey mistakes..

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Greg Hartman

No one is responding, so I will,l FWIW.

 

My primary all-around system is a Fuji X system.  Currently have a Fuji TX2 (I think maybe you have one also?) and several lenses.  I like it because: it is relatively small and light for a sophisticated DSRL (it's a mirrorless camera with APS-C sensor); it has what are for me very intuitive controls similar to those on the old film SRL's we used for decades before digital came along; it has excellent image quality ("IQ"); it is very versatile with the different lenses; it is weather and dust proofed; and it has a good burst rate with fast, accurate focus.  Fuji is also very good about providing free updates to firmware - the camera has constantly been improved since I bought it.  Major negative is that is it is way too big to stick in a pocket - carrying it in the field while managing dogs and trying to gun is a PITA.

 

My "pocket camera" is a Sony RX100V.  It is the size of a pack of cards and can literally be carried in a shirt pocket.  For that reason, I tend to wimp out and grab this camera most days when afield.  Besides the tiny size and weight, I like:  the very good IQ (result of a good Zeiss lens and a 1" sensor - very big for a pocket camera); super-fast burst rate for action shots (24 fps); super-fast and accurate focus; ideal zoom range for me (24-70mm equiv.); and lots of sophisticated capabilities you'd only expect to find on a good DSLR.  Major negative is the Sony controls - to access those amazing capabilities or really to do much of anything with the camera other than shoot in one of the automatic modes, you need to tediously dredge through dense menus on the tiny screen using tiny controls and buttons.  That is usually not practical in the field.  Nonetheless, most of the images I post here are taken with this tiny camera.

 

My IQ machine, for when I want the very best technical results that can be had, is a Sony RX1r II.  It has an industry leading, tack-sharp fixed 35mm Zeiss lens and a full-frame 42 MP sensor.  IQ is awesome.  IQ is nothing less than superb.  I also like it because it can be carried in a fairly big pocket, unlike the Fuji TX2.  The major downsides are cost and its lack of versatility.  The fixed 35mm focal length, plus the counter-intuitive Sony controls are limiting.  Perhaps another downside is that the IQ is so good that it is an unforgiving camera that is not for a newbie - if your technique is even a little bit less than perfect, your goofs will clearly show on the image.

 

Hope this helps, Bill.

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BlacknTan

Thanks for the reply, Greg, your input has helped me tremendously in my search..

 

The dust in the little Panasonic left a bad taste in my mouth, so it's replacement was bound to have an interchangeable lens system.. even if the camera itself is a bit larger. A tradeoff I will have to accept for serviceability.

I'm very close to pulling the trigger on the Sony a 6000. I looked at one in Best Buy yesterday. The size, I feel is do-able for the features I'm looking for. And, there is a $100 rebate right now. This camera might not be "cutting edge," but neither am I anymore! 😁

 

Thanks again for all the help, and I look forward to honest thoughts on my choice..

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oak stob

Is dust and a resultant sand hitch not an issue with cameras possessing a telephoto feature using a retracting, expanding lens system?

 

It was with one camera of mine but perhaps that problem has been resolved or is of small concern, comparably.

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Irishwhistler
4 minutes ago, BlacknTan said:

Thanks for the reply, Greg, your input has helped me tremendously in my search..

 

The dust in the little Panasonic left a bad taste in my mouth, so it's replacement was bound to have an interchangeable lens system.. even if the camera itself is a bit larger. A tradeoff I will have to accept for serviceability.

I'm very close to pulling the trigger on the Sony a 6000. I looked at one in Best Buy yesterday. The size, I feel is do-able for the features I'm looking for. And, there is a $100 rebate right now. This camera might not be "cutting edge," but neither am I anymore! 😁

 

Thanks again for all the help, and I look forward to honest thoughts on my choice..

 

Black & Tan,

My ILC is a SONY A 6000, a very nice mirrorless camera featuring a lot o' camera in a fairly small body.

 

Mike 🍀🇮🇪🇺🇸

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BlacknTan
3 minutes ago, oak stob said:

Is dust and a resultant sand hitch not an issue with cameras possessing a telephoto feature using a retracting, expanding lens system?

 

 

 It is my understanding that the retraction and expansion of the lens is what creates the problem, acting like a bellows drawing air in and out of the camera and lens. Hence, my desire for a system whereby the lens in easily removed to clean the sensor, at least..

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oak stob
24 minutes ago, BlacknTan said:

 It is my understanding that the retraction and expansion of the lens is what creates the problem, acting like a bellows drawing air in and out of the camera and lens. Hence, my desire for a system whereby the lens in easily removed to clean the sensor, at least..

 

Gotchya......the Sony RX looked to have a sliding lens system and I just wondered if things had gotten better in that regard.

 

The 6000 does look like it hits a number of good bells.

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Steve Van Dis

My go-to these days is a Sony RX10 mk4 "all in one". It has a 24-600mm Zeiss lens, shoots 24 fps at 20mp, 4K video and pretty much does everything I need. I use it primarily for my boys football and basketball teams but it does just about everything really well.

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dgfavor

I still use my trusty ol Sony A700 that has to be well over 10yrs old...took alot o crap for shooting a Sony back in the day...folks have come around though, they make good stuff.  I use good Sony glass and have a decent handle on processing.  The only reason I can see to buy new is video capability.

 

 

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