Jump to content
FRIENDLY REMINDER ABOUT HUNTING REPORTS/TOPICS... Read more... ×

Recommended Posts

mccuha

I have been pondering this idea for a while. I have a 4 wt fly rod and really enjoy it. I have yet to find a trout stream or pond where I can't use it successfully to land fish. However, here in my socalled home streams in NC. I fish a lot of small streams and the average fish is 8-10". Also the fishing can be pretty tight. I've been thinking of going to a lighter wt along with a shorter rod. I have thought about a 2wt with a rod no longer than 8'. Any ideas or suggestions on this. I usually cast a fly no larger than a 12. Will I be disappointed or not. I'm hoping with going with a lighter wt rod I will feel more fight and also be able to cast better in the tight cover. Suggestions, advice.  Also what is a good economical rod ,reel  to look at. If possible I want to keep the entire setup minus line to be under $150.  I know this diminishes the selection but  I don't want to drop a ton into something I use a few months a year.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
atticus

I have a Reddington classic trout 2 wt 7.5' and love it.  Casts well for a small rod and is perfect for small stream fish.  Not that it cant do bigger fish as I've landed some nice ones on it too.  It is not a nymphing rod and big flies are not its thing but it turns over a small dry beautifully.  I think it cost me $100.  I added an okuma reel for another 80 or so.  

 

Skimp on the reel and spend on the rod and line.  If you get into your backing on a 2 weight, call me and I'll be right there!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
salmontogue

If the streams are small with streamside brush and some overhead obstructions a 2wt that is 6-1/2 to 7-1/2 feet should work well.  Anything longer will be clumsy.

 

Perk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shoot-straight

I thought I wanted a light little rod for such streams. Bought one, hardly use it. It seems most small streams simply require less casting and more dapping and "flicking". Length helps with line management as well. 

 

Maybe I just need to fish w it more.

 

Just my $.02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mccuha
6 hours ago, atticus said:

I have a Reddington classic trout 2 wt 7.5' and love it.  Casts well for a small rod and is perfect for small stream fish.  Not that it cant do bigger fish as I've landed some nice ones on it too.  It is not a nymphing rod and big flies are not its thing but it turns over a small dry beautifully.  I think it cost me $100.  I added an okuma reel for another 80 or so.  

 

Skimp on the reel and spend on the rod and line.  If you get into your backing on a 2 weight, call me and I'll be right there!!

I have a 4wt classic trout. It is a nice rod to fish with.  I use it for everything. I was thinking a lighter wt would increase the fight of small fish. I do nymph fish these small streams with a 12-18 nymph with a dry used for indicator. Is this something I can do with a 2wt.  Or I just need to buy a shorter rod for my 4wt. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
polecat

I was waiting for an 11 foot switch rod to be delivered today but that won't help. I do know someone who likes the Ruby river 7'6 3wt.  if you can find one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cooter Brown
2 hours ago, shoot-straight said:

I thought I wanted a light little rod for such streams. Bought one, hardly use it. It seems most small streams simply require less casting and more dapping and "flicking". Length helps with line management as well. 

 

Maybe I just need to fish w it more.

 

Just my $.02

I agree with this 100%.  It goes against what most think but for the small so-called "blue line" mountain brook trout streams you're better off with a longer rod, 8 1/2 or even 9 ft. or so.  A back cast isn't going to happen, even roll casts are often problematic, and since you're not casting anyway the length allows you to cane pole the fly where it needs to be.  And also like Shoot straight said a longer rod helps line management--which is drift management--over the change-every-foot-currents in a small steam.  A short rod is a hindrance.

 

It's not my favorite type of fishing but as little as I've done it i figured out some rod length helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
atticus

I'm sure you could use it for nymphing as a dropper--I have not done it so I can't tell you how it will do. Fine I'm sure. I think of nymphing as high stick with a longer rod. I'm not much for nymphing anyway. My 2 wt can swing a soft hackle though. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
salmontogue

Missing from this discussion is the identity of the target fish.  I am assuming it is brook trout, a very sensitive fish particularly in clear water.  Cane poling, dapping or other similar approaches do not work well when fishing from the bank into the river.  The longer the rod, the more likely the fish will be spooked.  I have tried this approach on many small streams with clear water and the results are not encouraging.  The geometry of longer rods does not give significantly greater reach into the stream unless the fisherman is very tall, over nine feet.  The best approach is to fish upstream when possible and learn rod handling with both hands.  Wading into the stream, where possible will enhance your chances.

 

If the target species is bass, perch, pickerel.....everything changes because these species are not overly sensitive to shadows and motion while stalking bait, real or artificial.

 

Perk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WyomingArt

My wife took custody of my 2 wt. Otherwise it would be a favorite of mine for small water.  She has tennis elbow and finds it easier to cast. On a windy day it's tough to fish though.  On a quiet day it's a magic wand for dries. And it'll handle a surprisingly large fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mccuha

This rod would be used for trout be it brook , bows, or browns. They all occupy the thin blue line streams I like to fish in the mountains. I wade  as well in the streams trying to be stealthful as possible. I will probably try it in ponds as well.  In the sheltered canopy I have found that wind is very little problem. You guys out west on the other hand is a different story.

 

The thought is as well , if I get a 2wt I was thinking to not break the bank to make sure I was going to like it.  I'm primarily a trout fisherman for a few months during late spring, summer and early fall until bird season is in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ted Moore

I have a 6'6" glass 3 weight and also a 7' 3 weight and I love them both. I also have a nice Orvis 7' four weight that usually gets passed over for the 3 weights . I often fish a dry and a dropper on the 3 weights and don't have any problems. If I know I am going to be mostly nymphing I will grab my 9'  four weight or even a 10' five weight that I have as it is better for high sticking or if you have to add weight.  I have a rod being built this week that will be a 10' Euronymphing rod that will have a butt extension so I can fish it like a trout spey. I am excited to try that. 

I fished my glass 3 weight a couple of weeks ago with Billy, and was catching a bunch of small brookies and having a blast when I hooked into a 21-22" rainbow and the rod handled it fine. I've also seen Billy land 22" fish with his 2 weight. It sounds like a 2 or a 3 would be ideal for the streams you fish. By the way, I bought my 6'6" glass 3 weight from Sierra Trading Post for $59 dollars. It was well worth it if you want to try it on the cheap and I really like the rod. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mccuha
22 minutes ago, Ted Moore said:

I have a 6'6" glass 3 weight and also a 7' 3 weight and I love them both. I also have a nice Orvis 7' four weight that usually gets passed over for the 3 weights . I often fish a dry and a dropper on the 3 weights and don't have any problems. If I know I am going to be mostly nymphing I will grab my 9'  four weight or even a 10' five weight that I have as it is better for high sticking or if you have to add weight.  I have a rod being built this week that will be a 10' Euronymphing rod that will have a butt extension so I can fish it like a trout spey. I am excited to try that. 

I fished my glass 3 weight a couple of weeks ago with Billy, and was catching a bunch of small brookies and having a blast when I hooked into a 21-22" rainbow and the rod handled it fine. I've also seen Billy land 22" fish with his 2 weight. It sounds like a 2 or a 3 would be ideal for the streams you fish. By the way, I bought my 6'6" glass 3 weight from Sierra Trading Post for $59 dollars. It was well worth it if you want to try it on the cheap and I really like the rod. 

 

 

So what length rod would you go with in the small stream fishing.  The shortest I have is a 8’ 4wt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cooter Brown
18 hours ago, salmontogue said:

Missing from this discussion is the identity of the target fish.  I am assuming it is brook trout, a very sensitive fish particularly in clear water.  Cane poling, dapping or other similar approaches do not work well when fishing from the bank into the river.  The longer the rod, the more likely the fish will be spooked.  I have tried this approach on many small streams with clear water and the results are not encouraging.  The geometry of longer rods does not give significantly greater reach into the stream unless the fisherman is very tall, over nine feet.  The best approach is to fish upstream when possible and learn rod handling with both hands.  Wading into the stream, where possible will enhance your chances.

 

If the target species is bass, perch, pickerel.....everything changes because these species are not overly sensitive to shadows and motion while stalking bait, real or artificial.

 

Perk

It's interesting how different perspectives can be.  I've always found the longer rod much more effective on the "blueline" brookie streams, giving me more control and distance from targets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ted Moore
19 minutes ago, mccuha said:

So what length rod would you go with in the small stream fishing.  The shortest I have is a 8’ 4wt

 

Try a 6' 6"  two or three weight. They are a blast. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×