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Natural Gas Explosion

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VizslavsBird

Maybe it's just the crappy way you said what you said. 

 

Any its Brad's house, Brad's rules and Brad's worries

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gunsrus
33 minutes ago, Flairball said:

 

I think you misunderstand. Nothing wrong with being non-union, until you take the job of a union guy locked out. Then you’re a scab. 

 

Is discussing the structure of employment politics? 

Absolutely !  Union , non-union , Left and Right , supporters , non supporters . What side supports what ? It's inevitable !

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Brad Eden

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CUT THE CRAP MODERATOR WATCH

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Dave in Maine
2 hours ago, Cooter Brown said:

From this and other posts you've made you seem to be from the energy industry so your perspective is appreciated.

 

Last year I smelled gas outside near the street and called the gas co.  It turned out to be a junction of some sort in a neighbor's yard.  From talking to the guys fixing it, I got the impression, which might be wrong, that the main line pressure wasn't that high to begin with and was stepped down even more before it went to each house.  Of course I might have misunderstood.  Is that more or less what happens?

 

It'll be interesting to hear what they determine the cause to be.

 A neighbor up the street had a patch of grass that just wouldn't stop dying.  Over a couple years, he replanted, re-sodded and generally tried just about anything to get it to grow.  Then, one day, the gas company sniffer truck happened to drive through the neighborhood and all the bells and whistles went off.  Turned out there was a low-level leak in the main right next to where the lawn kept dying.  They had to dig up the street and fix the main, a real to-do.  The gas, being heavier than air, was leaking out and blanketing the grass.

I don't want to speculate on the cause of these blasts, but the geographic distribution is too wide to not have been a system failure somewhere, at least as a component.  This is the kind of incident that rarely happens - the usual gas explosion is a string of houses/ buildings blowing up when a construction crew hits a line.

 

My TV news is now laying blame on an overpressure.  Duh.

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MAArcher

I'm guessing the geographic distribution only looks scattered because all the houses with leaks in between just didn't blow.  And Massachusetts neighbor hoods are the result of constant subdivision so you have the really old homes that were once on small farms that are now surrounded by a succession of newer homes from each real estate market boom.  I'm wondering if it was mostly older homes that blew and maybe our gas codes need to be updated. 

 

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VizslavsBird

May have been an old low pressure network that was updated to a medium pressure that required regulators at each meter.  Houses that blew might have had meters in basements that were not equipped with pressure regulators (common on old low pressure systems) and services were unknown to the workers doing line upgrades.  Meter readers and construction crews might not have got all their communications done before pressure conversion.  When converted to medium pressure with no regulators, house devices were overloaded and leaked gas, a spark and then a fire.

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WPG Gizmo

Just yesterday morning Columbia Gas announced that they would be working to upgrade the lines in and around the affected are and then this happened.  Now the Mass Governor comes on the news this afternoon and states that Columbia Gas has dropped the ball so he has assigned Eversource to run point on this.  I would not want to own stock in Columbia Gas right now I would say that they are looking at a whole bunch of lawsuits when this is all said and done

 

Quote

 

LAWRENCE (CBS) – Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker has declared a state of emergency in Lawrence, Andover and North Andover following a series of gas explosions and fires in the Merrimack Valley.

 

Baker said during a Friday afternoon press conference that the state of emergency was declared so the Department of Public Utilities can select who is in charge of the recovery efforts.

Related: Merrimack Valley Gas Explosions: What We Know

 

Baker and Lawrence Mayor Dan Rivera were both critical of Columbia Gas’ response in the nearly-24 hours since dozens of fires broke out in Lawrence, Andover, and North Andover.

“Today, on a number of very significant issues, we heard one thing and something else happened,” Baker said of Columbia Gas’ response.

boston house State Of Emergency Declared; Lawrence Mayor Says Gas Company Hiding From The Problem
Eversource will now take the lead in recovery efforts.

 

“Eversource is going to be in charge of this project from this point forward. We believe that will make a big difference with respect to the relationship between what gets told to us and what actually happens on the ground.”

 

Rivera said Columbia Gas has fallen short from the start.

“The least informed and the last to act has been Columbia Gas,” Rivera said.

“We have tried to no avail to give Columbia Gas the space, the traction, the time to effect a coherent plan that deals with the three biggest issues in front of us: a fundamental understanding of what happened and why; a basic plan to clear the dwellings and businesses of gas so as to get the lights back on… and a plan to get people back in their homes and business as soon as possible in the safest way. We are about in hour 23, and none of these is clear to anyone.”

 

Rivera said that as he toured the worst hit areas of Lawrence Friday with Gov. Baker and Senator Elizabeth Warren, they saw no Columbia Gas crews at work.

danrivera11 State Of Emergency Declared; Lawrence Mayor Says Gas Company Hiding From The Problem

 

Mayor Rivera harshly criticized Columbia Gas for establishing their command center in a different location from the rest of the massive state and federal emergency response.

 

“They’re hiding from the problem,” Rivera said. “If they were here they’d have to see the major who’s here from State Police, they’d have to see the governor’s staff, my staff, the chief’s. They’d have to see their faces every five seconds. They’re not here.”

 

Rivera then called on Columbia Gas to hold a public meeting Friday afternoon to answer questions before the media. A short time later, Columbia Gas announced its president would hold a 4 p.m. press conference.

 

Earlier in the day, residents in North Andover attended a meeting with Columbia Gas representatives, thinking they would have questions answered. Instead, they left a 15-minute meeting angry when employees simply wrote down questions, but did not answer them.

 

Baker said he was willing to give Columbia Gas the benefit of the doubt as the events unfolded, but “the follow through just wasn’t there. We don’t have time… We need to get on with this.”

“There were a series of commitments that were made with respect to what was going to happen between 7:00 in the morning and 3:00 this afternoon,” Baker added. “The performance relative to those representations has been so far below what was talked about this morning that it raised major issues in our mind about the leadership team’s ability there to actually deliver for the people of Massachusetts.”

 

“We were asking for a heavy lift,” Mayor Rivera conceded. “We weren’t expecting them to hit it out of the park, but we sure did want them to swing the bat.”

“We had a responsibility to give them that opportunity – and they spent it and wasted it.”

 

 

 

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