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caleb

Settling on a Wood Stove

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caleb

My wife and I are planning to put a wood stove in our 1300 sq ft house.  Space is a big consideration, and heating efficiency is secondary.

 

I stopped by my local stove store last night, and checked out some of the new-style upright stoves, like the Morso 7948 and the Jotul F370.

 

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Have any of you tried one of these little stoves?  If so, did the short little pieces of wood drive you mad?

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Hub

Jotul is a great name in woodstoves and they were on my short list.  I ended up with a soapstone Hearthstone Heritage.  It holds it's heat so much longer and more even than cast iron.  Soapstone is worth a look.

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martyg

I’ve put Morse in the two places that I designed. If you are rocking a high performance build on your house it is one of the few stoves with outside air feed - a must in a tightly constructed home.

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Treerooster

Some of the things to consider when buying a wood stove are ease of ash removal and size of the logs it can take.

 

If you use the stove a lot ash removal can be a pain over a long winter. If it's difficult to remove then that just exasberats the chore.

 

Logs less than 16 inches can be hard to purchase as not a lot of wood guys cut it much shorter for the simple reason that it is more work for the same amount of wood. You can cut it yourself, but it a can be hard to stack. Split wood is not straight like sawn lumber and stacks of short logs tend to tip over more easily. You can pile the wood, but the inner pieces will not dry as fast. A stack of wood allows air to flow through more evenly.

 

It's possible to get around some of that, but it just makes things a little bit harder. I doubt I would buy a wood stove that couldn't take at least a 16 inch log.

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Swampy 16

Vogelzang TR001. With that size construction it was I’ll probably need to be something mobile-approved. Use that in a google search and it may help you locate something. Like Hub said, Jotul is a very nice, well made stove. We ended up going with a gas stove that people can’t even tell isn’t a wood atove. We love it. No work, no smell, no ash, and it heats a 2000+ sq ft ranch. Problem is of course you need gas service to go that route.

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NW River Mac

I'm not familiar with the stoves you have shown here, but I can almost guarantee with a certainty that the glass will never look like that even 12 hours after cleaning.  

 

Just noticed the Jotul takes up to a 12" log and the other gives a width of 12.99 inches.  You may be hard pressed to find someone who will have wood that small, maybe not.  I always cut my wood at least three inches shorter than the max just to make it easier to load. If it's only a stove for weekend comfort then either look like they would be pretty to watch burn.  

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max2

(IMO) if stove is just for heat supplement I say go for it if the look is what's grabbing at ya.  I will agree with most others with a twelve inch log  it seems like a pain in the neck all around.  I like the look of it and would imagine in the correct setting it would look even nicer.   I am sure it is efficient as Jotul makes nice stoves. I have an older Jotul -Combi and it has never let me down.

 

I have not been in a stove store in yrs & it seems they  have come a long way. 

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Brad Eden

I heated a small farmhouse for 27 years primarily with a Jotul wood stove, can't remember exact Model but it was medium sized. It would be over 30 years old now, none of the new catalytic converter stuff, just an efficient as hell burner. I kick myself for leaving it with the new home owners (who bailed on mortgage and the old house has been abandoned for going on 4 years, and I bet that stove is still there). Its worth some $ now. We went with a Harmon Pellet stove in this new place due to the small size of house and my lack of desire to deal with wood anymore.

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john mcg

I wonder if All Nighter” still makes a stove.

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martyg
5 hours ago, NW River Mac said:

I'm not familiar with the stoves you have shown here, but I can almost guarantee with a certainty that the glass will never look like that even 12 hours after cleaning.  

 

Just noticed the Jotul takes up to a 12" log and the other gives a width of 12.99 inches.  You may be hard pressed to find someone who will have wood that small, maybe not.  I always cut my wood at least three inches shorter than the max just to make it easier to load. If it's only a stove for weekend comfort then either look like they would be pretty to watch burn.  

 

A quick wipe with ash and the glass comes clean on a Morso.

 

I buck and split our own wood so size isn't an issure.  We have a lack of high BTU wood here, so the woodcutters just focus on ponderosa pine. I can always source oak or maple if I keep my eyes op[en.

 

10 - 12 11" pieces of firewood brings our 2,000 sq ft up to mid 70's on a single digit day for 24+ hours.

 

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Dogwood
12 hours ago, Hub said:

Jotul is a great name in woodstoves and they were on my short list.  I ended up with a soapstone Hearthstone Heritage.  It holds it's heat so much longer and more even than cast iron.  Soapstone is worth a look.

 

+1 on the Hearthstone. We use ours for supplemental heat and it’s been terrific. Very easy to clean out and I like the soapstone look.

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MNice

Not wood but we have a Jotul free standing gas unit in our basement. It's awesome.

 

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shoot-straight

Jotul makes a nice looking functional stove. 

 

Had a hearthstone for 10 years. Switched to a blaze king, it's pretty amazing. Burns forever and the customer service is freaking unbelievable. (Good) they are rather ugly though.....

 

Hearthstone was very pretty, but make sure you have a good- no great dealer. Without them you will be pounding sand if you have any issues. Ours was pretty good overall however. The stone does radiate heat nicely, but takes much longer to get going. Not good for quick heat. 

 

There are are pros and cons for radiant vs convective heat.

 

 

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Curt

We put a wood stove in our previous house, it was a Napoleon cast iron model.  It was a fairly small stove,  a model 1400 if I remember right.  Our floor plan was open and that thing heated the entire place all winter long and looked good doing it.  Find out what size wood pieces will fit in your stove before buying, it is a pain trying to buy wood much shorter than 16" unless you plan to cut your own.  Our stove was a cinch to clean and dump ash, quick and easy.  I bought a steel bucket at tractor supply, we'd dump the ash in the bucket and set it outside in the snow to cool before disposing of it.  I miss that stove.

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Tim Frazier

I love this idea but could never get myself to spend the money.  We had a small Drolet for a decade or longer and it was wonderful.  We moved or we would still be using it.  Now we have a massive old Vermont Castings which is a beast, probably could burn stumps in it!  Ha!

 

Wow!  Just looked up Drolet prices, they have gone up!  I shouldn't have sold it with the house!

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