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grouse28

Baselayer = modern jargon for Long Johns.

 

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Marc Ret
13 minutes ago, grouse28 said:

Baselayer = modern jargon for Long Johns.

 

 

Shouldn't you be bonding with your brothers instead of hanging out here?😉

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Dave Erickson

I used my new Point6 base layer on a very cold 4 day hunt in South Dakota. I sweat a lot and it loaded up with sweat and I was wet and clammy for the rest of the day. Nothing wrong with the garment, but this is my 2nd attempt with merino wool base layers and it doesn't work for me in high exertion situations. They load with perspiration and never dry out. 

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john mcg
3 minutes ago, Dave Erickson said:

I used my new Point6 base layer on a very cold 4 day hunt in South Dakota. I sweat a lot and it loaded up with sweat and I was wet and clammy for the rest of the day. Nothing wrong with the garment, but this is my 2nd attempt with merino wool base layers and it doesn't work for me in high exertion situations. They load with perspiration and never dry out. 

Try a very thin synthetic tech layer and a mid-weight over that.

 

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oak stob

I have found the ability to easily(read quickly) add and subtract clothing to be of most importance with the comparably short big hour interval manner of my upland birdhunting....much moreso than fabric.

 

Actually and obviously apart from dying, getting cold opens the door to one of hunting's great pleasures...getting warm again.

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River19

Everyone is different and what works for one person to layer may not work for another.

 

Personally, I like a thin wicking t-shirt first followed by either my thin Ibex wool LS quarter zip or if colder, the T-shirt then a LS wicking shirt and then a heavier Ibex wool quarter zip.  Those two setups serve as my base for any activity from October to April.......hunting, winter fat-biking, snow shoeing etc.  temps from 40 above to 20 below.  What I layer on top of that obviously depends on conditions and temps.  

 

I will sweat with that setup but never get chilled.  Wool still insulates when wet etc.

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grouse28

To me, moisture wicking is a myth. I sweat a lot, I can overload any moisture wicking material.

i like something I can strip down to and it dries quickly as I wear it.

My grandmother and mother used to say before we went out to play all day in the snow, “make sure you wear a base layer of your moisture wicking, synthetic long johns”! Oh and don’t forget the bread bag over your socks in your boots or wear your 4 buckle artics.

Those were much simpler times to freeze your butts off.

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Brad Eden

Thin nylon "wicking" socks under wool socks are the real deal. Not sure of the alchemy or sweat quotient but they sure help with overall warmth and comfort on cold days following a dog or if sitting like a lump in a tree stand. I'm not just blowing smoke.

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River19
27 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

Thin nylon "wicking" socks under wool socks are the real deal. Not sure of the alchemy or sweat quotient but they sure help with overall warmth and comfort  on cold days following a dog or it sitting like a lump in a tree stand. I'm not just blowing smoke.

 

Hmmmm never tried, will file away for later experimentation.

 

I can conclusively say the "wicking" "base layers" I wear combined with the wool help either keep my sweat from chilling me or allows my sweat to move into my wool layer where it still insulates pretty well when wet.  But what do I know, it's just worked for me for the past 4-5 years in everything down to -10 air temps while fat biking during the winter.

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john mcg

Its a matter of physics. You are not wrong.

For a person that perspires more. A very thin tech layer relatively tight to skin has a better chance of keeping up with moisture transference via heat to the second layer.

Any system can be overwhelmed. That is where squash work comes in.

Ventilation balance is your friend.

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Dave Erickson

Looking back I once had a poly- something union suit that kept up with my sweat. It was finely ribbed and snug. It got pretty stinky, but it worked. I’ll have to look into something similar again.

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