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Thunder Bay

Boots for Cold Feet - Stationary vs Active

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Thunder Bay

Was on a steelhead fishing trip (in a drift boat) last week and froze - normally I’m pretty tolerant of the cold weather but this time it was painful. So, I needed some “powerful cold feet medicine.”  After looking at many different options, I went back to what has worked before and a little bit of old school.

 

Goold old Mickey Mouse boots by way of Uncle Sam.  I spent a fair amount of time in some like this in my youth (both black and white boots).  I purchased these new, unused from a surplus store.  I expect to use them for more steelhead fishing, tractor time moving snow, in the garage, ice fishing, etc.

 

Do you have any powerful cold feet medicine/recommendations?

 

CB613908-E6B2-4495-ADDB-4C010D936FAF.jpeg

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grouse28

Those Mickey Mouse boots are hard to beat if sitting all day. Felt pacs are second on my list for cold weather. I normally wear uninsulated boots above 20 degrees or so.

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WI Outdoor Nut

For my cold deer hunt sits, I run Lacrosse Ice Kings.  In some of my hunt areas I need to cross water.  There I run an 1800 gram Cabela's knee boot, and if really cold, will add boot blankets that I slip on once in the stand.  Generally speaking, if my feet are cold in either of these situations, my whole body is already cold. 

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Samuel Hoggson
51 minutes ago, WI Outdoor Nut said:

....if my feet are cold in either of these situations, my whole body is already cold. 

 

Therein lies the answer.

 

Hands and feet do not manufacture heat.  Heat is delivered to your hands and feet by way of arterial circulation.  The heat is manufactured by core/visceral organs that tend not to take a rest.  (Wouldn't want our hearts, livers, kidneys, and brains to shut down)   Skeletal muscles in arms and legs are minimally active while sitting.  Core skeletal postural muscles are relatively more active while sitting (one reason you can get a backache from prolonged sitting). 

 

So how do you keep extremities warm when inactive?  Number one - protect the core.  Second - give thought to insulating the heat-conducting blood vessels.  Add insulation to arms and legs.  I keep a blankets in the Taj, or carry a two-sizes-too-large bib out to the stand.  Third, yes, of course you should select heavily insulated - loose fitting - boots. 

 

Best part:  if you better protect the core, and do a better job insulation arms and legs, the venous blood returning to the core will arrive at a higher temperature.  Vessels to extremities will constrict less, you will stay warm longer.  Win-win.

 

And do some isometric contraction/relaxation of extremity skeletal muscles while sitting.  

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dogrunner

I like Baffin boots for cold weather where I don't walk much. 

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martyg
3 hours ago, Samuel Hoggson said:

 

Therein lies the answer.

 

Hands and feet do not manufacture heat.  Heat is delivered to your hands and feet by way of arterial circulation.  The heat is manufactured by core/visceral organs that tend not to take a rest.  (Wouldn't want our hearts, livers, kidneys, and brains to shut down)   Skeletal muscles in arms and legs are minimally active while sitting.  Core skeletal postural muscles are relatively more active while sitting (one reason you can get a backache from prolonged sitting). 

 

So how do you keep extremities warm when inactive?  Number one - protect the core.  Second - give thought to insulating the heat-conducting blood vessels.  Add insulation to arms and legs.  I keep a blankets in the Taj, or carry a two-sizes-too-large bib out to the stand.  Third, yes, of course you should select heavily insulated - loose fitting - boots. 

 

Best part:  if you better protect the core, and do a better job insulation arms and legs, the venous blood returning to the core will arrive at a higher temperature.  Vessels to extremities will constrict less, you will stay warm longer.  Win-win.

 

And do some isometric contraction/relaxation of extremity skeletal muscles while sitting.  

 

This. As soon as your core cools down.... it is game over.

 

if your extremities are getting cold put on another layer. Most winters I am outside from 0800 - 1600 at 8’500’ - 12’000’. Protecting your core is the first step.

 

Also wear high-quality, knee high socks for skiing. They will keep your calves warmer and help your body deliver warmer blood to your feet.

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topdog1961

When it gets really cold  I use Irish Setter Rutmaster 1200gm 17 inch rubber hunting boots. They are heavy but my feet stay warm even in a stand. 

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SODAKer

I've got to the age where after a certain degree my feet aren't gonna have to worry about getting cold; I'm either sitting in the truck on the way back home or I never made it out of the house. However I do read these posts with interest as one never knows...

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WMassGriff

Mickeys are the best for me IF I am not doing a lot of hiking. I have found that a Heater Body Suit with hand warmers thrown into the legs is just the ticket for late season stand hunting. Of course you need to carry that bulky thing in and I have a dedicated pack frame for that. One nice thing is that you can get by with using your bird hunting boots.

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Thunder Bay
22 hours ago, dogrunner said:

I like Baffin boots for cold weather where I don't walk much. 

I have pair of the Baffin Trapper’s - I really like these boots. My brother has heavily endorsed these boots, he has two pair that he rotates daily during deer season (sitting in the stand).

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Irish Joe

Grabber insoles.

From the same company that makes the chemical hand and toe warmers.

I saw them in my local sporting goods store recently and I plan to try them fly fishing in cold weather.

At less then $2.50 a pair it is worth a try.

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mcgreg

I like the mickys, but they are tippy tuff to walk in the dark to the stand, specially if unfamiliar new spot in snow. Not the best boot to climb with either.

Sorrels walk better, but dont stay warm once you stop moving. Next time out, am going to use those chem toe warmers inside sorrels, see what happens.

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MAArcher

Thick wool socks with silk or poly liner socks really help any boot. 

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Mike da Carpenter

Keep your head and kidney area covered and warm along with having an air gap inside of your boots and you will be golden.

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