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Remo

HUNTING ND? MAYBE NOT

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sharptail grouse
2 hours ago, Reeba said:

I was always curious about this.  Since, for example, the nature conservancy pays property taxes, why would they care?

I used to work for TNC. The fact that we paid property taxes on a pretty big hunk of land (and allowed some hunting access and were good land managers) was great silencer of local critics. Paying property taxes is probably one of the best decisions TNC ever made in working in rural areas.

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Remo
7 hours ago, Reeba said:

I was always curious about this.  Since, for example, the nature conservancy pays property taxes, why would they care?

Can't raise beans on that land so conservation ownership is a sin against ag. Well, can't drain the wetlands either so that's a double sin. NDGF pays in lieu of taxes on their WMAs, samre rate as appraised land, and they can't buy land in ND either.

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Reeba
5 hours ago, Remo said:

Can't raise beans on that land so conservation ownership is a sin against ag. Well, can't drain the wetlands either so that's a double sin. NDGF pays in lieu of taxes on their WMAs, samre rate as appraised land, and they can't buy land in ND either.

I can understand why agribusiness might not like it.  But, it would seem to me that a grain farmer would think taking some land out of production while probably not enough to affect prices, could only improve prices.

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Jack L
38 minutes ago, Reeba said:

I can understand why agribusiness might not like it.  But, it would seem to me that a grain farmer would think taking some land out of production while probably not enough to affect prices, could only improve prices.

 

One would sure think so.  Seems pretty basic supply and demand.

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Remo
2 hours ago, Reeba said:

I can understand why agribusiness might not like it.  But, it would seem to me that a grain farmer would think taking some land out of production while probably not enough to affect prices, could only improve prices.

 

No, they have a treadmill mentality that crop acres, any crop acres, are better than taking the poor quality land out of production to lower costs. Taxpayers subsidize it through the farm program. At some point the bill will come due but nobody looks farther ahead than the next crop. I'm seeing native sod broke out now on hills so steep that it would be difficult to walk up there. And grain prices are falling. Just visited with  a bank lender that said many of his customers are eating their own equity. Some folks have a short memory in farm country.

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Jack L

Whether grain prices are high or low, the response is always plant more.

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Reeba

When I talk to full time 24/7  farmers as opposed to part time hobby farmers.  It seems like farming is in their blood to such a degree that any ground that is not producing an ag product is wasted land and it's kinda like leaving food on your plate.  And in this reference they're not talking about their own land, they are talking about land use in general.

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Jack L
1 hour ago, Reeba said:

When I talk to full time 24/7  farmers as opposed to part time hobby farmers.  It seems like farming is in their blood to such a degree that any ground that is not producing an ag product is wasted land and it's kinda like leaving food on your plate.  And in this reference they're not talking about their own land, they are talking about land use in general.

 

 

That is spot on.

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Sage Hen
3 hours ago, Reeba said:

When I talk to full time 24/7  farmers as opposed to part time hobby farmers.  It seems like farming is in their blood to such a degree that any ground that is not producing an ag product is wasted land and it's kinda like leaving food on your plate.  And in this reference they're not talking about their own land, they are talking about land use in general.

  I believe this is true likewise I have a friend who is a retired rancher and I think it troubles him deeply to think of any grass that is not feeding stock.

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Remo

The hearing on SB-2315 was held Thursday during our worst blizzard of the year and is going to reopen in a second hearing at 8:30 AM, 3/21.

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Canuck

Remo, we caught the northern edge of that same system on Thursday so I stayed inside and found a video link to the North Dakota Legislature hoping to catch the discussion and vote on 2315. Watched the entire session, which was interesting, only to learn that the Bill was going back to the Ag Committee until the vote on the 21st. 

 

We will finally get  some weather next week but now face a bigger flood threat with all the new snow.

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Randy S

I ran into a couple of farmers in central ND a few years ago who pointed out a half section of Bureau of Reclamation and insisted that as a hunter, I should be upset the land was taken out of production??? Also said that I should dump Pheasants Forever because they were just making country farmers angry. Some viewpoints are very difficult to understand.

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robp

Any news, finger crossed candles lit 2315 doesn't pass

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