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Calls, blinds, and decoys?

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Brad Eden

Northerners don't have nearly the clout of southerners when it comes to wild turkey hunting. Some say them southern birds are a lot tougher to hunt given they have decades of paranoia built in, as compared to the relatively recent reintroduction of wild turkeys to the Northeast. I defer to southern wild turkey hunters gladly. Even so, I think the ability to call is overrated. Some think a person needs to be a champion trophied caller to be successful. I don't believe that. Knowing how, and when, how loud and how often to scratch out some yelps, squeak out some kee kee runs, and slap out some aggressive cuts on a box is more important. The best call of all can be no call at all, sometimes. I'm actually not bad with a box and mouth diaphragm calls. My hunting buddy sounds like a drowning cat when he decides to help out with a diaphragm call. I cringe when he starts. But it generally doesn't seem to bugger up a hunt or shut down a hot Tom that we are working. That's another thing, sometimes you need to shop for a bird that can be killed on a given day, and be willing to walk away from one that can't. JMO.

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MAArcher
17 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

Northerners don't have nearly the clout of southerners when it comes to wild turkey hunting. 

 

I think you have give credit where credit is due.  Northerners are so good at killing turkeys that we wiped them out once already.  😈

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bobman

Lol says the guy that is always tracking something he wounded

 

“Good boy Wes find it” !! hahahaha 

 

just messing with you

 

I missed the first turkey I ever shot at I was so excited lol I still can’t believe I missed a huge strutting turkey 

 

but every one since then ended up in our oven

 

 

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Treerooster

Hobbes thanks for the luck. I'm in Neb for the early archery season. It's more like a warm up hunt as the turkeys are either not broke up yet or just breaking up and there ain't a whole lot around. It's good to get out though, I even have my dogs with me as I have a spot to run them...in the afternoons anyways.

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Treerooster

I don't get all the negativity about being a good turkey caller or learning to be one. For me turkey calling is much more than just replicating the sounds a turkey makes. As Brad eluded to it's about knowing how loud or soft, when and when not to, where, how much or how little, what to say...etc etc.

 

Sure you can kill turkeys without being a decent caller, but if you know a thing or two about calling and have more of aturkey vocabulary, you don't have to wait for the gobbler to "get right". Certain situations need certain calls and if you can make an educated guess you will be more successful...and, at least for me, it's a heck of a lot more fun. I have a great day when I've talked back and forth with a hen and never even saw a gobbler.

 

You can kill turkeys with yelps and clucks, but it is more fun to call in a bird, that otherwise would have not come in, with something different.

 

I am so glad I learned to hunt turkeys  before all these new decoys came about. It forced me to learn more about their language. I would never even come close to placing in a calling contest, but having a bit of a turkey vocabulary has sure helped me enjoy turkey hunting much much more.

 

Turning a flock of geese or ducks with a call makes that type hunt more fun. Calls in turkey hunting are 100 times more important and that much more fun.

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MAArcher
1 hour ago, bobman said:

Lol says the guy that is always tracking something he wounded

 

“Good boy Wes find it” !! hahahaha 

 

just messing with you

 

I missed the first turkey I ever shot at I was so excited lol I still can’t believe I missed a huge strutting turkey 

 

but every one since then ended up in our oven

 

 

Don't you jinks me on turkey.  Its my saving grace.  I've pulled the trigger on over 40 turkey in the last 20 years and I've only missed two.  

 

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MAArcher
17 minutes ago, Treerooster said:

having a bit of a turkey vocabulary has sure helped me enjoy turkey hunting much much more.

 

Calling a turkey in close enough to feel the spit and drum in your chest, by doing some soft purrs and leaf scratching, is one of the biggest rushes in the woods you can have!  

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WPG Gizmo

People make to much effort to be perfect when calling a Turkey they just have to sound like a Turkey is supposed to sound.  Spend some time in the woods with Turkeys around and listen they all sound different some sound as sweet as can be others sound like a frog is stuck in their throats and I have heard sound that you think no way did that come from a Turkey but it did.

 

Here is a good place to learn the different sounds https://www.wideopenspaces.com/sounds-turkeys-make-and-what-they-all-mean/

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bobman

I don’t use a decoy too easy for someone to shoot at it and cause an accident turkey hunting is the most dangerous hunting 

 

a young guy got blasted last weekend down here got hurt pretty bad last I heard

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mccuha
On 3/26/2019 at 10:37 AM, Brad Eden said:

Northerners don't have nearly the clout of southerners when it comes to wild turkey hunting. Some say them southern birds are a lot tougher to hunt given they have decades of paranoia built in, as compared to the relatively recent reintroduction of wild turkeys to the Northeast. I defer to southern wild turkey hunters gladly. Even so, I think the ability to call is overrated. Some think a person needs to be a champion trophied caller to be successful. I don't believe that. Knowing how, and when, how loud and how often to scratch out some yelps, squeak out some kee kee runs, and slap out some aggressive cuts on a box is more important. The best call of all can be no call at all, sometimes. I'm actually not bad with a box and mouth diaphragm calls. My hunting buddy sounds like a drowning cat when he decides to help out with a diaphragm call. I cringe when he starts. But it generally doesn't seem to bugger up a hunt or shut down a hot Tom that we are working. That's another thing, sometimes you need to shop for a bird that can be killed on a given day, and be willing to walk away from one that can't. JMO.

Being able to call is ok but it’s more about being set up in the right place and making the call and knowing when enough calling is enough

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mccuha
On 3/26/2019 at 2:32 PM, MAArcher said:

 

Calling a turkey in close enough to feel the spit and drum in your chest, by doing some soft purrs and leaf scratching, is one of the biggest rushes in the woods you can have!  

I’ve called wiley toms in before by just scratching in the leaves and making a spit and drum sound   Educated birds at times don’t like calls. 

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Brad Eden
On 3/26/2019 at 2:32 PM, MAArcher said:

 

...soft purrs and leaf scratching...

Deadly. Good "call".

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SelbyLowndes

I have mixed feelings about decoys.  Nothing to do with ethics, but I think they are usually an impediment. I admit a decoy on a field edge or on a straightaway down a two path road can be helpful, and when calling in the woods one will divert a bird's attention off of you,  but I'm bad to stick with where I am when I put a decoy down.  Moving to the right place is often a necessity when calling a gobbler.  In addition I am convinced birds can and do become decoy shy.  Just my experience though   

 

As for calls, I am totally convinced that a vest full of them is best.  No telling how many times I've been about to give up on a spot when I pull another call out of my pockets and all of a sudden a bird that's been ignoring all my efforts will gobble back.

 

I believe in blinds.  I don't hunt public property, and I am convinced that the running and gunning style of hunting will scare the birds off a place.  Instead , I'd rather do my scouting and determine just where on my place the gobblers are strutting and congregating, and  where they are most likely to roost.  I use an Ameristep one man chair blind mostly and I'll often leave one in place for weeks at at time.  It always amazes me how something as wary as a big gobbler will ignore a six foot high blob of blind placed in the middle of a pasture where they like to strut all day....SelbyLowndes

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