Jump to content
Dogwood

Newbie deer hunter book?

Recommended Posts

Brad Eden
2 hours ago, MAArcher said:

But the short actions can be lighter and the bolt throw shorter with quicker follow up shots.  From what I’ve heard anyway.  I’ve never owned a long action.

Thats why I can't put down my smallish, light, Remington Model Seven 7mm-08 and my other longer and heavier rifles don't get many walks. I sit tight and wait and watch a lot but also am on my feet stalking about, scouting, and generally running and gunning. So much easier and more pleasurable with a lighter carbine short action rifle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Clueless1

I am partial to a few that are 'less than ubiquitous'.  The 7mm-08 is a wonderful cartridge that will do everything you need without beating yourself up.  The .270 will do it all as well, slightly more on the beating up.  The 30-06 will do it all as well.  Slightly more on the beating up as well.  .308 wonderful as well. 

 

Any of the above will be fine.  .270, 30-06 and .308 are probably the ones that you will be able to find ammo for more easily than the rest.  Without handloading, those are the ones I would recommend.  I have been able to find 7mm-08 ammo most places as well, but it is definitely less seen than the others, which would be considered "standby's". 

 

If you were to ask me to pick one caliber for you to shoot the rest of your life, with what I know right now about your shooting habits and what you wish to do, I would pick a .270 in stainless and a composite stock. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dogwood

What should I budget for a very good rifle and scope?  

 

Makes that are great, ones to avoid?

 

Bolt action, semi-auto, carbine, other?

 

New or used gun/scope?

 

Total weight of the gun and scope relevant or not so much?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Clueless1

Most of this is a "Chevy vs Ford" argument.  There are as many opinions on this as there are calibers to choose from.  You mentioned the possibility of elk which is why most of us are staying .270, 7mm and 30 calibers.  (I like the 6.5x55 Swede but I handload and if going after elk would spend quite a bit of time making sure I got the right bullet construction.)

 

I know my Dad has a stainless Ruger M77 for about $750.  That rifle would last a lifetime without hardly any maintenance.  I'm partial to bolts, I just don't know enough about semi-autos to give a good opinion on them.  I'm also a KISS guy, and any of the manufacturers are really going to do what you want to do without much trouble.  You can go low end Ruger American, Savage Axis II (better trigger than the original Axis), etc and they will all shoot within a tolerance that is acceptable for putting meat in a freezer, even with factory ammo.  I think I picked up a new Savage Axis for just over $300 for a backup gun plus any kids that need something as the youngsters come of age.  It's blued not stainless, but it's also not going to be spending a week in the backcountry.  It shoots 1.5" at 100yds with the first factory ammo I picked and I don't have more than a few hundred rounds through it.    

I've never been concerned about weight, but I don't have bull barrels for deer hunting.  After that, they will mostly be within a pound or two of each other and I don't do any spot and stalk western hunting with mine either.  I'm all archery when out west. 

 

The 'short action' that has been mentioned vs a long action might shave a few ounces and supposedly makes for a quicker follow up.  I haven't had any issues with either in the 30 some years I've been at this.  If you look at a .308 cartridge vs a 30-06 cartridge you can see the difference in length.  It just takes a longer 'throw' to extract a 30.06 vs a .308.  I've never personally heard anyone claim that they didn't get an animal because of the longer time it took to re-chamber one of the long cartridges. 

Some claim the action can be stiffer because of this, some claim to be able to get a second round off quicker in a bolt action because of this. 

Many cartridges start out with either a .308 or 30.06 case because being military the brass was available.

The 7mm-08 is a .308 necked down to 7mm.   

The .270 is a 30-06 case necked down to .277 diameter.  It's a longer cartridge and needs to have a longer action. 

 

This is a long way of saying "Pick one of the standard calibers in a standard rifle and go hunt."  If you feel like learning more as you go, you might end up with a preference for a caliber but any of them have put lots of pounds of meat in freezers.  If I was closer to you I'd spend a few hours at the range and let you try a lot of them, as long as you didn't tell my wife I have a lot of them😁

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Clueless1

https://www.tombstonetactical.com/catalog/ruger/m77-hawkeye-all-weather-rifle-270-22in-stainless-4rd-black/

 

Out of stock but gives a price of $663.  Add a 3-9 scope, if actually planning on going west may be consider a 4-12 scope.  I usually budget $250-300 for scope for deer.  Leupold has one that is 3-9x40 for $250 or so.  You can go as crazy as you want on glass but for putting meat in freezer ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dogwood
1 hour ago, Clueless1 said:

https://www.tombstonetactical.com/catalog/ruger/m77-hawkeye-all-weather-rifle-270-22in-stainless-4rd-black/

 

Out of stock but gives a price of $663.  Add a 3-9 scope, if actually planning on going west may be consider a 4-12 scope.  I usually budget $250-300 for scope for deer.  Leupold has one that is 3-9x40 for $250 or so.  You can go as crazy as you want on glass but for putting meat in freezer ? 

 

This could be the ticket. I originally thought a nice wood stock and blued barrel would be "cool"  but the relatively low maintenance/durability of the composite/stainless combo sounds way cooler given the odds of hunting in wet and/or freezing conditions.  I also like the simplicity and safety aspect of bolt actions.

 

Boy the caliber considerations and choices of rifles/rounds makes shotgun gauge/shell selection look like child's play. Amazing that so many exist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Eden

Bolt action. That's one decision you can make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MAArcher

The most unsafe gun I've been around was a Remington bolt action that occasionally fired when you clicked the safety, so I don't know if they are the safest.  Some of them don't let you unload with the safety on.  

 

I'm looking for a deer gun now and I can't decide between a Remington 7600 pump or a bolt gun or some sort.  Wood no plastic.  I've settled on .308 because it has all the advantages listed above and I already reload for it.  F

 

Go with wood and just hunt with it.  Some dents and scratches just show you use it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobman

If you have shotguns with tang safeties a nice older Ruger 77 tang safety red butt pad makes a very nice choice.

 

I have three all are accurate nice guns and you can find them down here very reasonably priced 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
max2
1 hour ago, bobman said:

If you have shotguns with tang safeties a nice older Ruger 77 tang safety red butt pad makes a very nice choice.

 

I have three all are accurate nice guns and you can find them down here very reasonably priced 

I must agree. My go to is a Ruger 77 Mt rifle in 30-06 . Never has let me down. Very accurate. I did put a Timney trigger in it . 

A work horse. feels good  & I have the utmost confidence in it while pointing it at white tailed deer. Mule deer also. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lee sykes

So many options, new and used that will suffice for hunting deer.  Half the fun is figuring out what you like best.  

You've got some good ideas here to go on.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Eden
11 hours ago, MAArcher said:

The most unsafe gun I've been around was a Remington bolt action that occasionally fired when you clicked the safety, so I don't know if they are the safest.  Some of them don't let you unload with the safety on.  

 

The Remington 700 had a known trigger issue that is very well documented. They had a recall for a new trigger assembly. Otherwise I think bolt action rifles are inherently one if not the safest actions, and the most reliable.

 

The most unsafe rifle bar none is the older Winchester 94 lever, typically in 30-30. IMO. The need to squeeze lever and trigger and slowly let the hammer all the way down (on a live round) and then eased back to half cock safety resulted in a lot of hammer slips and accidental firing. Also unloading the rifle by jacking out shells leaving it ready to fire the whole time is always a hoot. The hammer slip happened to my wife and she wouldn't touch that rifle ever again. They eventually came out with a rebounding hammer and then a cross bolt safety which they have now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Clueless1
14 hours ago, Dogwood said:

 

This could be the ticket. I originally thought a nice wood stock and blued barrel would be "cool"  but the relatively low maintenance/durability of the composite/stainless combo sounds way cooler given the odds of hunting in wet and/or freezing conditions.  I also like the simplicity and safety aspect of bolt actions.

 

Boy the caliber considerations and choices of rifles/rounds makes shotgun gauge/shell selection look like child's play. Amazing that so many exist.

 

I have personally seen wood warp in the rain and it changed the point of impact.  At 50 yards that gun at that time would have been 'iffy' on hitting  a deer.  While I like the wood/blued combo if I was choosing one gun it wouldn't be wood/blued.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MAArcher
2 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

The Remington 700 had a known trigger issue that is very well documented. They had a recall for a new trigger assembly. Otherwise I think bolt action rifles are inherently one if not the safest actions, and the most reliable.

 

The most unsafe rifle bar none is the older Winchester 94 lever, typically in 30-30. IMO. The need to squeeze lever and trigger and slowly let the hammer all the way down (on a live round) and then eased back to half cock safety resulted in a lot of hammer slips and accidental firing. Also unloading the rifle by jacking out shells leaving it ready to fire the whole time is always a hoot. The hammer slip happened to my wife and she wouldn't touch that rifle ever again. They eventually came out with a rebounding hammer and then a cross bolt safety which they have now.

I had a marlin lever 30-30 and I made it a habit after it was on safe to "test it" by giving the trigger a squeeze.  One day it went off while my family was all loading up in the morning.  I told my dad what my procedure was and that I thought some how the hammer had hung up and not gone on half cock.  He insisted that it must have slipped from under my thumb but I know it didn't go bang until I pulled the trigger so the half cock never engaged and it wasn't all the way back.  I miss that gun though.  I let a sister in law keep it after she shot her first deer with it and then she divorced my dopey brother and he didn't get it back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Eden

I know Remington gets beat up a lot lately, but I really like their current Model Seven short action bolt rifle. My friend Scott bought one of these new last year in .308. I was I impressed with the satin fit and finish. Very handsome rifle. I have an old Model Seven with wooden stock etc., that is an extension of my arms. Probably not the right choice for big(ger) dudes who like a heavier longer and overall bigger rifle and shoot over large open areas with rests, from stands. But for denser cover, still hunting and even relatively long shots it's a nice rifle. They went off the rails for a lot of years and offered it in a laminated stock that I couldn't stand the looks of. It comes in .243, .260, 7mm-08 and .308. Model Seven CDL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×