Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
blanked

4WD truck, A/T tires, and chains

Recommended Posts

bobman

The track grabbers work great but they are just for getting unstuck not cruising around

 

 very handy and easy and simple to put on

I’ve used them on my one ton van motor home and it’s a heavy vehicle 

 

backed right out of some soft mud easy peasy, they paid for themselves that day

 

not many trees to hitch a winch to in Kansas or North Dakota or any of the prairie spots I hunt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chukarman

I have been stuck quite a few times. I can normally find a way out with a shovel and/or traction mat. I have been stuck quite a few times when beach launching my boat in Baja with my F350. Sometimes I have driven out after some shovel work and airing down my tires, but a couple times I needed another vehicle to pull or to use as an anchor point for my winch (Warn M15000).

Traction mats are a good investment, as is a shovel, Hi-Lift jack, and a come-along. For years I got along fine carrying a shovel and come-along in my Jeep, which is a small, lightweight vehicle. Bigger vehicles require more serious equipment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NECarson
On 7/9/2019 at 7:40 AM, Jazz4Brazo said:

Cheaper alternative and with additional uses is to get a Hi-Lift Jack and if you hunt the open spaces some geound anchors...

 

Hi-Lift Jacks

 

Pull Pal

 

BTW,  never owned either nor had a need to and understand proper use is critical as they can be very dangerous when used incorrectly...or so I've read...search for past threads here for more info or goggle you tube videos on uses.

 

J4B

I have done many, many of the odd things that a Hi-Lift is so great for. They flat work, for a ton of different things. 

 

Most are approximately as safe as Russian Roulette. I have gotten slightly wiser, and now despise the things. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chukarman
On 7/8/2019 at 4:41 PM, blanked said:

Camping on public land for up to 2 weeks at a time gets me into some dicey roads after rain or snow melt.  Letting half the air out of my tires helps but it’s still dicey.  Will chains added be a cure all or have you still been stuck 

 

Having the right tires also helps a great deal. I use agressive tires on my Jeep - Cooper STTs.

 

P5130687.thumb.jpg.64942522a89cafc2f1a43d73ae21d743.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wildcat
On 7/9/2019 at 10:14 AM, Flush said:

It really all depends on where you are and the conditions. 

In the west there are times and places where chains are an absolute life saver. Without them, you will be constantly stuck and using your winch (and anchor because there are no trees for miles) constantly.

In other words, in some places chains are far more valuable than a winch. The safest of course is to have everything (winch, anchor, chains etc..) at your disposal.

 

Those traction grabber type things work and are a good alternative if you only have a short distance to go, but if you need to go many miles through gumbo roads (typically in sage) you will be better served with real chains on all 4 tires. This is pretty common practice in parts of the west, especially when there is snow, and the worst is melting snow. Obviously it's best to avoid these types of situation but a common scenario is your elk camp (or whatever camp) is 15 miles miles back in via dirt roads through sage country. A bunch of rain or snow comes along and the roads that are easily drive-able with a passenger car when dry become completely impassible even with 4x4 and good tires... Sure you can wait it out to get in or out of your camp, but you might be waiting a LONG time depending on the time of year.

 

 

 

 

Growing up in FL we used taller thinner tires, winches, pull straps and hi lift jacks due to the mud and water. Out west I only use 'real' chains on all 4 tires and these tires also have good traction. I carry a long heavy duty pull strap and a shovel as well. The native soil (not Ntl Park roads) out here when wet literally turns to an alien substance that will adhere to your tires making the tread worthless and if you are on any type of grade, gravity will take your vehicle places you may not want to go, eg over a cliff. Sooo, depending on where you are, your environment, weather and soils will dictate your plan of action

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hub

I just wanted to through out a note of caution on the high life jack.  A farmer buddy got killed by one a few years back.  I am interested in the track grabbers Bobman metnioned, but they sure get an awful lot of hate on Amazon.  40% of folks rate them 1 star and it looks like it's mostly because they break immediately on first use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WI Outdoor Nut
15 hours ago, Hub said:

I just wanted to through out a note of caution on the high life jack.  A farmer buddy got killed by one a few years back.  I am interested in the track grabbers Bobman metnioned, but they sure get an awful lot of hate on Amazon.  40% of folks rate them 1 star and it looks like it's mostly because they break immediately on first use.

I was thinking the exact same thing.  Often when one is stuck, the vehicle just needs a little bit of help.  The track grabbers would seem perfect - easy on, easy off, small storage and should get you out in most situations.  This past winter we had significant snow on our lake with drifts that would be 3-4'.  During a tough lighting day where you could not see the drifts, I put my truck smack dab into a drift.  I pinned it, but just fell short of making it through and the frame hung up.  I had to essentially dig the frame out until the truck fell back on to the ice.  If I would have the track grabbers, I think it would have been the perfect tool.  I will run chains, but they are a PIA to put on, and are hard when turning on pavement between your off road runs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NVChukarChaser

On a late season Chukar hunt where we had a couple inches of snow with a lot of mud and water underneath. We had three trucks with three different tires. It was a slight uphill run to the mountain so you could be relatively sure you could back out if stuck, so we gave it the Cheddar. My truck with Toyo ATs was left on the flats and I was abandon to walk the last mile or mike in a half through the mud and muck which was horrible leg burner before hitting a steep and nasty mountain. The truck with the Wrangler Duratracks made it far enough and the new BFGs ATs on my brothers truck made it to the parking spot. After that, I only run the new BFGs on my trucks and I’m very impressed with the traction and ride. I carry chains for the truck and have really aggressive mudders on the Jeep. Like Chukarman said, a Jeep is way easier to get unstuck than a diesel so you need to have a little more gadgetry in a full size pickup and especially a diesel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bigdog MN

Not to hijack the thread but I also read a bunch of the negative comments about Trac Grabbers ( I had never seen them before and am interested) so I e-mailed the company yesterday asking the question: " I am interested in your product but had read some negative reviews regarding either the straps breaking or folks not being able to get out of mud. Expect many of these "failures" are because of how people used the product. Are you aware of practices that would tend to damage the straps (too much speed I suspect) and are there any "tricks" to help in the muddy situations? Want to be prepared ahead of time. "

 

A fellow titled as Managing Partner replied in about an hour with:

Trac-Grabber was actually originally developed for getting unstuck from mud.  During the testing process we have used the same set of Trac-Grabbers over and over and have never broken one.  We see the negative reviews also and it is very disheartening to see failures and breakage.  The straps are very strong and the only way they break is if they are constantly rubbing on either a sharp area of the wheel or if they are getting interference from a component on the vehicle such as a break caliper shield.  This can sometimes happen with smaller wheels like 15" on some vehicles.  It is important (as stated in the instructions) to make sure there is sufficient clearance for the Trac-Grabber and strap to make a full unobstructed rotation.  Only applying enough power to get the vehicle to climb up and over the traction block is also important for the longevity of the product.  Excessive wheel spinning is not good for getting unstuck and it is not good for the product.

 

When used as directed the Trac-Grabber is an awesome rescue product to have on board!

 

One note, a number of the negative reviews did mention the company stood behind teh product and sent replacement parts, which Trac-Grabber confirmed to me in a follow up to the above reply.

I am planning on ordering a set since I am usually alone when hunting. Not worried about deep mud but the greasy, thin kind and snow/ice. Thanks for the tip!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobman

Mine worked fine getting a van camper out of soft mud and I bet it’s at least a 8000 lb vehicle probably more

 

if you are a dumbass and rev the engine to spin the tires it might not hold up

 

i gently applied throttle and they pulled me out of the mud perfectly 

 

i washed them them off and put them back in the box nothing looked damaged I will use them again 

 

they are easy to install,  but again you just use them to get yourself unstuck not drive off 

 

they will I’ll work in wet snowy mud but I don’t think ice is what they are designed for

 

they are kind of like paddling if that makes any sense

 

i don't intentionally drive down iffy roads

 

if it needs chains I’m not going there, but chains would be better on ice

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WI Outdoor Nut
3 hours ago, NVChukarChaser said:

On a late season Chukar hunt where we had a couple inches of snow with a lot of mud and water underneath. We had three trucks with three different tires. It was a slight uphill run to the mountain so you could be relatively sure you could back out if stuck, so we gave it the Cheddar. My truck with Toyo ATs was left on the flats and I was abandon to walk the last mile or mike in a half through the mud and muck which was horrible leg burner before hitting a steep and nasty mountain. The truck with the Wrangler Duratracks made it far enough and the new BFGs ATs on my brothers truck made it to the parking spot. After that, I only run the new BFGs on my trucks and I’m very impressed with the traction and ride. I carry chains for the truck and have really aggressive mudders on the Jeep. Like Chukarman said, a Jeep is way easier to get unstuck than a diesel so you need to have a little more gadgetry in a full size pickup and especially a diesel.

Thanks for sharing and what a great side by side test.  It is interesting, I had the BFG's on a Toyota truck back in my youth and never remember getting stuck.  I never bought them again as they seemed to hold marble sized stones between the treads and once you hit speeds near 60 mph, the tire would expand and the stone would let lose hitting my rocker panels, and it showed.  I have since been a fan of the Firestone Destination AT's but will admit I have gotten stuck a few times in them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sprocket

I used to wheel a lot with my Jeep ('99 TJ) and learned a lot about getting un-stuck.  If you're on a road, generally speaking you'll be fine with good rubber - weather events can change things hence the "generally speaking".

A Hi-Lift is a good tool - and can be dangerous too.

A Pul-Pal is made by someone who doesn't want to lug a simple boat anchor - not a mushroom or grapple.  Sure it folds flat - what is the rating of the bolts?

 

Winch, tree straps, pulleys, etc can get you out but you need to understand the dangers.  The receiver hitch front & back idea is a good one - and versatile too.  The winch becomes one more use.

All this adds about 300 lbs to the load.

 

If you look at the boards folks use in soft surfaces - sand mostly - you can get a good idea of different recovery methods for different "stuck" scenarios.

 

Most of my stuck moments were because of lumpy stuff, not mud - a lift for good approach/departure angles and skid plates - lots of skid plates will help but mostly keeping your tires on the highest point of the lumps will keep you out of trouble.  Lots of weight added by the plates & all the gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ryanr
On 7/9/2019 at 5:51 AM, NW River Mac said:

I have a philosophy about the woods.  If I can't do it in 2wd then I am ripping up someone else's property and shouldn't be there.  I use 4wd to get me out of the predicaments I get into with 2wd.  

Depending on snowfall amounts, here in PA certain state forest roads will have mandatory 4wd & Chains requirements to use them to access interior gunting areas. And these aren't hairy two tracks either but actual graded dirt/gravel roads

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WMassGriff

Diamond chains for me, plus a good jack! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Field Grade

Just to emphasize what others have said here, full-on tire chains can be tough to install, especially in the field. Truth be told I have a tough time installing them in my driveway on dry pavement... getting them cinched down tight, properly centered on tires, etc. I can only imagine trying to put them on with half-frozen hands in snow, mud and ice at night, which with my sh#t luck is when I would need them.

 

I have a couple sets of these ratchet emergency chains, which are easier to put on the tires, especially if you are already in trouble.

 

https://www.tirechain.com/Tire-Chains-Ratchet-Strap-On.html

 

These may be a bit more sturdy than the Trac-Grabbers. But you still don't want to spin the wheels or drive much over 5 mph with the ratchet chains on. If they loosen or even somehow break they could tear wheel wells and undercarriage up.

 

rjj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×