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Thinblueline

Puppy Picking By Video

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Thinblueline

I’m going to be picking a puppy by video for the first time in less than two weeks. The picking takes place with this breeder when the pups are five to six weeks old. I know a lot of guys talk about letting the puppy pick you, but after following other bits of your advice to pick the litter first, I picked a litter a tad out of range for two back to back trips for picking and picking up, to let the pup pick me. 

 

Looking at the breeder’s past videos on his Facebook account, he does a nice job of bringing each pup front and center on camera, turning the pup around to catch all angles, while giving a short narration about that particular pup. Naturally he can’t spend a lot of time filming each pup, so I thought I’d get some more advice from any of you who have video picked before. 

 

What can you guys look for on video at this young age? Is it acceptable to ask for a second quick video snippet of one or two I’m particularly interested in, and if so, what would you guys want to see? I’ve already got enough info about the pup’s parents and the breeder’s philosophies, I’m just wanting anything more specific to look for in a moment’s time to help with the pick. Some of you mentioned good feet and tight toes, so that’s something I hadn’t thought of before. 

 

Anything else you can can share about your video picking experiences or advice would be appreciated.  

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Pudgy gopher

Tell the breeder about yourself and family. So that he/she can get a better feel for who you are. The breeder is already seeing some of the puppies personalities show through and may be able to help in matching the pup with a personality that fits you. This is all a crap shoot. How you nurture the pup will have as big of an impact on how it fits into your family as it's genetics. But it does help in the process of choosing between two or more candidates that are of equal physical attributes in your selection criteria.

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greg jacobs

You need to watch video of the pups interacting with each other and with people. Picking a great litter is a good choice which often means long distance. 

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Scott Berg

5-6 weeks old is too young to tell anything.  Picking pups at 8 weeks is still a crap shoot but you can tell a lot more at 8 weeks as compared to between 5 and 6 weeks.  It's a useless endeavor at that age.  Why do the puppies have to be picked so early?

 

SRB

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Thinblueline
1 minute ago, Scott Berg said:

5-6 weeks old is too young to tell anything.  Picking pups at 8 weeks is still a crap shoot but you can tell a lot more at 8 weeks as compared to between 5 and 6 weeks.  It's a useless endeavor at that age.  Why do the puppies have to be picked so early?

 

SRB

 

Just the way this breeder does it. No other way around it if I want a pup from this litter. The parents of this litter are accomplished wild bird hunters with several placements in wild bird field trials. That’s what I’ve been looking for so I’m going to roll with it and hope for the best.

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Flush
14 minutes ago, Thinblueline said:

 

Just the way this breeder does it. No other way around it if I want a pup from this litter. The parents of this litter are accomplished wild bird hunters with several placements in wild bird field trials. That’s what I’ve been looking for so I’m going to roll with it and hope for the best.

 

What wild bird field trials are these? 

I've never heard of a French Brittany placing in wild bird field trials, at least not the common and popular America Field trials that are open to all breeds.

 

Perhaps the French Brittany folks have created closed breed trials that they run on wild birds. I'd be interested to hear more about these trials.

 

 

As far as picking a pup at 5 or 6 weeks I wouldn't waste your time worrying much about personality etc.

Just pick the of the sex and with markings you like because everything else will be a crap shoot.

 

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Thinblueline
3 minutes ago, Flush said:

 

What wild bird field trials are these? 

I've never heard of a French Brittany placing in wild bird field trials, at least not the common and popular America Field trials that are open to all breeds.

 

Perhaps the French Brittany folks have created closed breed trials that they run on wild birds. I'd be interested to hear more about these trials.

 

 

As far as picking a pup at 5 or 6 weeks I wouldn't waste your time worrying much about personality etc.

Just pick the of the sex and with markings you like because everything else will be a crap shoot.

 

 

I don’t know anything about any kind of field trials so I don’t even know how to question claims, but I’ll attach the link to the dam so you can see what I was reading. This is a repeat litter since the first one was evidently pretty successful. One of this site’s members has a pup from the previous litter from these same parents he is very pleased with, and he had heard reports on another pup from that litter that was showing promise of being a dog of a lifetime when it was hit by a car. 

 

http://broughtonsfrenchbrittanys.com/Indiana page.htm

 

 

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Flush
20 minutes ago, Thinblueline said:

 

I don’t know anything about any kind of field trials so I don’t even know how to question claims, but I’ll attach the link to the dam so you can see what I was reading. This is a repeat litter since the first one was evidently pretty successful. One of this site’s members has a pup from the previous litter from these same parents he is very pleased with, and he had heard reports on another pup from that litter that was showing promise of being a dog of a lifetime when it was hit by a car. 

 

http://broughtonsfrenchbrittanys.com/Indiana page.htm

 

 

 

 

Thanks, Hard to find much info on the format and requirements but as I suspected these are specialty trials held  by/for French Brittany folks.  

 

 

 

 

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MNice
12 hours ago, Pudgy gopher said:

Tell the breeder about yourself and family. So that he/she can get a better feel for who you are. The breeder is already seeing some of the puppies personalities show through and may be able to help in matching the pup with a personality that fits you. This is all a crap shoot. How you nurture the pup will have as big of an impact on how it fits into your family as it's genetics. But it does help in the process of choosing between two or more candidates that are of equal physical attributes in your selection criteria.

 

^^^^This^^^...and I let the breeder pick. Not just any breeder but one that I'm confident in and takes the time to match the right pup rather than just make a transaction.

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Speaks

If you have a good litter and the pup is physically sound you wont likely go wrong. 

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Scott Berg
4 hours ago, Thinblueline said:

 

Just the way this breeder does it. No other way around it if I want a pup from this litter. The parents of this litter are accomplished wild bird hunters with several placements in wild bird field trials. That’s what I’ve been looking for so I’m going to roll with it and hope for the best.

 

There is no way to be politically correct with this one so I am just going to say it.  You are using field trial placements as your primary measure with a breed that is not competitive outside of a closed breed trial.  If you believe trials are a good indicator it makes little sense to arrive at this decision IMO.

 

I have bought a lot of outside pups over the years and never been asked to select at 5 weeks.  IMO, it suggest the breeder's interest is his/her convenience because there is no way to make a meaningful decision and/or placement at 5 weeks of age.  It's up to you to decide if you are OK with choosing essentially blindly other than primary markings. this practice.  Having said this .... This litter very well might be better than 1st pick at 10 weeks of age from another breeder if this breeders track record is great.

 

SRB

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Thinblueline
5 minutes ago, Speaks said:

If you have a good litter and the pup is physically sound you wont likely go wrong. 

 

That’s what I’m starting to think.

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Brad Eden

My breeder of Springers has a long list of potential owners year to year. So they are all spoken before before they hit the kiddy pool. There are years like this one when she can't keep everyone happy. (Only one litter) So they are typically picked by her to fit the needs of the owner, color, markings, male, female etc. 

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Thinblueline
2 minutes ago, Scott Berg said:

 

There is no way to be politically correct with this one so I am just going to say it.  You are using field trial placements as your primary measure with a breed that is not competitive outside of a closed breed trial.  If you believe trials are a good indicator it makes little sense to arrive at this decision IMO.

 

I have bought a lot of outside pups over the years and never been asked to select at 5 weeks.  IMO, it suggest the breeder's interest is his/her convenience because there is no way to make a meaningful decision and/or placement at 5 weeks of age.  It's up to you to decide if you are OK with choosing essentially blindly other than primary markings. this practice.  Having said this .... This litter very well might be better than 1st pick at 10 weeks of age from another breeder if this breeders track record is great.

 

SRB

 

You make some valid points but I should say there were other things that went into my pick that I just didn’t get into in these threads. Obviously I wanted parents that were good wild bird hunters, and this breeder hunts his dogs extensively on grouse and woodcock in Minnesota, as well as other upland birds in the prairie states. That I know from my communications with him before committing to this litter. The fact they have performed well in wild bird trials, even if the trials are exclusive to this breed, seems to support the breeder’s claim they are active and competent wild bird hunters. 

 

Also important to me was a breeder dedicated to the integrity of this breed, which this breeder has demonstrated by his screening of the ausable gene (spelling?), his OFA hip certifications, his select picks of breeding dogs (this sire was imported from France and the grandfather of this litter is a highly decorated dog in Europe), and his desire to breed for all the desirable traits some us want in a house dog as well as drive in the field. 

 

I also appreciated the breeder’s clean and modern facilities, weekly videos of the puppies for those of us to watch and enjoy from a long ways away, and his health guarantee for the pups. 

 

Add to that one member on this board has a pup from the previous litter from these parents in which he is very pleased, and another report from a guy with one of those pups who said the pup was appearing to be the best grouse dog at an early age that he had before it was hit by a car, all added up to be a pretty safe bet for me, specifically for a French Brittany.

 

I have gone all in on the French Brittany breed. I love their small size for a house dog, their docked tails to keep from knocking things over, their generally closer working range than setters and pointers, their drive in the field and woods, their laid back personalities in the house, and their affection. So there aren’t a ton of options when specifically targeting a French Brittany, when I limited the breeders to those I could drive to in a half day from northeast Wisconsin and whose dogs are likely to be hunted primarily on grouse and woodcock. This particular breeder was one of four or five I was looking hard at, but I really like the looks of these parents the best and the timing was right. I think I’ll do ok, but I do respect your opinions, which I have soaked up from many other threads.

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Ky setter man

Having bred dogs for over 20 years ,I agree with Scott. I dont think the pups have recieved all their individual traits at 5 or 6 weeks. Those extra 2 weeks have shown to be quite valuable in disposition and temperament  . All my opinion  , mind you ,and experience , from 23 years of hunting and trialing dogs. 

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