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mccuha

Concrete slab replacement

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mccuha

Not sure if this is the right place to put it. If it needs to go to another topic heading feel free. 

 

 

I do a lot of plant maintenance. I’ve been working at a pretty large plant lately.  They asked me to submit them a bid to cut out damaged sections of concrete floor and repouring.  I’ve done a lot of concrete just not inside.  Is there a contractor on board that’s done this work.  There are a lot of spots they want to cut out probably the average size is 4’x4’ square.   Also there is a couple probably around 15’x15’ and one big one 25’x25’.   I was going to use concrete out of a truck for all of it but I know they will only give me about 90min to unload.  So now I’m considering using a mixer and mix my concrete for the small ones and anything over 2 yards order a truck.    Also n those big pours I was planning on using a Georgia buggy to bring the concrete in. 

 

Am I thinking this right or do I need to do it a different way. 

 

If if you need you can pm me.  Thanks.  In advance 

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greg jacobs

There are epoxies that can be used on acid damaged concrete. We use a pumper truck and hoses to do more or larger areas

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mccuha
2 minutes ago, greg jacobs said:

There are epoxies that can be used on acid damaged concrete. We use a pumper truck and hoses to do more or larger areas

They are asking for 4000psi with fiber. Also dial pins in the existing concrete 1’ apart.  Pump truck crossed my mind but I only have 2 spots that’s really going to push me but I was thinking 2 Georgia buckets for those 2 spots.  The rest should be pretty easy.  Also I think might be a prob with pump truck is a lack of space for it and the pour is over 100yds  apart.  I do have some columns they want repaired as well. These I’m using epoxy cement 

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Mike da Carpenter

My days of hand mixing anything over 3 bags are over.  If I were doing that much, I’d have me and 2-3 other guys at a minimum, especially when getting to the bigger pours.  After saw cutting and before pulling the old cement, do the math and only remove either a 1/2 load (premium price) or a full load.  Concrete buggies are worth their weight in gold, but a pump truck is so much better.  All depends on how far you need to go, and how close the big slabs are to each other.  But, that’s just me.  I tell everyone that there is only 2 guarantees with cement.  It’s going to get hard and it’s going to crack.  Do your best to slow down both processes.

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mccuha

I have several people going to help with it.  The big pours I’ve got a couple of really good finishers.  I do a pretty good job with hand float and bull float but I’m going to leave the big finishes to more experienced hands.    We want hand mix the small stuff. I’ve got a mixer so all we ll have to do is add bags ,water and fiber and let the mixer do it’s job.  I’d love to order that concrete already mixed for the small stuff but they are so spread apart and a long way from where the truck will be.   The company is less concerned about cost and more concerned it’s done right.  

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Zkight89

A welder messing with concrete?!?!??

 

 

 If it don't carry an arc, leave it in park! 

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Mike da Carpenter
17 minutes ago, mccuha said:

The company is less concerned about cost and more concerned it’s done right.  

 

Company is old by an old timer who appreciates quality is my guess, or he/she was raised by one that pounded that into their head.  Either way, it doesn’t matter, you need to do the best job for them and thank them for doing things right.  So many want to cut corners and tell you to fill it to 2” as nobody will know the difference once it’s poured.  

 

Tell the owner he made a Michigan Carpenter smile when he heard of the quality coming out of that plant.

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mccuha
24 minutes ago, Mike da Carpenter said:

 

Company is old by an old timer who appreciates quality is my guess, or he/she was raised by one that pounded that into their head.  Either way, it doesn’t matter, you need to do the best job for them and thank them for doing things right.  So many want to cut corners and tell you to fill it to 2” as nobody will know the difference once it’s poured.  

 

Tell the owner he made a Michigan Carpenter smile when he heard of the quality coming out of that plant.

Agreed.  I do a quality job for them always and they know that.  That’s why they wanted me to do the job. When I’m done I want them to know it was done right and they’d spread the word to other plants in the area.  Not per say my specialty. I’m a jack of a lot of trades.  I m just fortunate that I have some very experienced and competent supporting cast. 

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Dave Medema

Pump it.  

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Randy S

Do what you gotta do to get readi mix. Nobody respects a contractor on a commercial job hand mixing unless he's setting  mailbox.

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mccuha
16 hours ago, Zkight89 said:

A welder messing with concrete?!?!??

 

 

 If it don't carry an arc, leave it in park! 

well , I did it for quite a few years in the past working for the inlaw. I'm in the camp that if I can do it, it might as well be me that gets paid.  It seems I'm getting deeper in plant maint. but I still do a lot of welding. This company has a ton and I mean a ton of storage racks they put tires in. They get bent and broken all the time. If I worked by myself I could work on these every day almost all year and never get caught up.  I had a couple guys help me a few months ago and we attacked them very hard. now all I have to do is work on them maybe 1 week or so a month.   I like to mix up the monotony of doing the same thing all the time.  The thing is if and when things get tight I have other skills to fall back on.  After this concrete project I may not do another any time soon. we'll just have to see. 

 

Going to do a little plumbing for them in the AM  Overhead water line has a rotten spot in it and is leaking badly. Going to replace about 20'. I'll make a good lick and still be home before lunch.:D

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Zkight89
1 minute ago, mccuha said:

well , I did it for quite a few years in the past working for the inlaw. I'm in the camp that if I can do it, it might as well be me that gets paid.  It seems I'm getting deeper in plant maint. but I still do a lot of welding. This company has a ton and I mean a ton of storage racks they put tires in. They get bent and broken all the time. If I worked by myself I could work on these every day almost all year and never get caught up.  I had a couple guys help me a few months ago and we attacked them very hard. now all I have to do is work on them maybe 1 week or so a month.   I like to mix up the monotony of doing the same thing all the time.  The thing is if and when things get tight I have other skills to fall back on.  After this concrete project I may not do another any time soon. we'll just have to see. 

 

Going to do a little plumbing for them in the AM  Overhead water line has a rotten spot in it and is leaking badly. Going to replace about 20'. I'll make a good lick and still be home before lunch.:D

I'm all for doing whatever gets the bills paid! But for concrete work I'd happily supervise a sub contractor and pocket a little $$ 😂😂

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mccuha
1 minute ago, Zkight89 said:

I'm all for doing whatever gets the bills paid! But for concrete work I'd happily supervise a sub contractor and pocket a little $$ 😂😂

well to be honest. they increased the size of the slab cut outs. I'm now going to line up a couple finishers. I'll supervise and either handle the nozzle on the pump truck or run a Georgia bucket.  The more I can do myself the more buck is in my pocket. Plus I haven't been exercising lately like I should be. This will save me from having to go to the gym.

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Zkight89
50 minutes ago, mccuha said:

well to be honest. they increased the size of the slab cut outs. I'm now going to line up a couple finishers. I'll supervise and either handle the nozzle on the pump truck or run a Georgia bucket.  The more I can do myself the more buck is in my pocket. Plus I haven't been exercising lately like I should be. This will save me from having to go to the gym.

I had to over see a sub pump several ring wall foundations under 110' diameter sulphur tanks years back. Dragging that damn hose around is no fun! 

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Mike da Carpenter
37 minutes ago, Zkight89 said:

I had to over see a sub pump several ring wall foundations under 110' diameter sulphur tanks years back. Dragging that damn hose around is no fun! 

 

There used to be constant banter between the trades (all good natured), and I remember some guys when we were building one of the Country Clubs in Metro Detroit telling me how I “should put down my hammer and try doing a real man’s job” as they were dragging the pump hose around and bent over screeding.  Just looked at them and said “No thank you, I’ve made better life choices to get where I’m at”.  Man did that statement get everyone going that day.  It sure did make the day interesting and it seemed as though nobody was immune from the insults...and not only did the work still get done, but we all had a good time with it.

 

I really do miss those days.  If I tried that kind of stuff now, I’d be sent to counseling after meeting with Human Resources.  Seems as though all these flu flu drink coffees and vegetarian diets are producing some very thin skin on the kids when they are born.  😂

 

I’m sure we all have stories, and comparisons to what it was, and how it now is.  Man does the world ever change fast.

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