Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ridge Runner

Alder regrowth

Recommended Posts

Ridge Runner

The Pa. Game Commission has been cutting in their words "mature" alders in our area for some time now.  Their idea is that it will regenerate and be more desirable young growth for wildlife.  Does anyone have any idea how long it takes to regrow?  Or at least how long it should be until you begin to see signs of regrowth?

 

Thanks

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Spin

Speckled Alder (often mistakenly called Tag Alder is common as dirt in northeast Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I'm not very sure how fast it's regrowth

occurs after clear cutting but it isn't terribly long and like Popple it comes back in thick and shrubby.  One variable is the "Where" factor. Dry hill tops , amount of sun, Moisture (Speckled Alder aren't very fussy but it seems to me that they love moist to down right wet bottoms. There are very large areas where they are the only significant

tree/shrub growing for hundreds of acres in near impassable density. It thins out over years as it grows to full maturity.  I'm betting it provides very valuable cover for a wide variety of wildlife species.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Treerooster

You should see signs of regrowth the next growing season. IME the alder in N Wis gets about 3 to 5 feet tall the first growing season after being cut. 

 

Just how old an alder patch has to be to benefit grouse and/or WC I don't know. Not too old I would imagine, probably soon after as it shades out the undergrowth and either bird is able to walk around in the patch.

 

I think it takes about 10 years before an alder patch is big enough to be huntable (able to walk through/into it...reasonably). A young alder patch is just too thick to venture into from a practical standpoint.

 

I believe it takes about 25 years for alder to become mature. It lasts a while after that but does get old and thins out eventually.

 

Most people in N Wis look at alder as a weed. I love it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Treerooster
6 minutes ago, Spin said:

Speckled Alder (often mistakenly called Tag Alder is common as dirt in northeast Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

 

Call me a mistake guy. I even named my PP after "Tag Alder". Tag Alder Tangle...call name Tag. Speckled just wouldn't cut it.  ☺️

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
watermen

I have a 12 year piece, a seven year piece and one was cut last year.  The 12 year piece was full of woodcock last year according to my nephew, the 7 year old piece down the road did not have birds during the same time or flight.  There was considerable growth end of August in the 27 acres done last year.  The grouse have not been very good lately, (3 years) so it's hard to tell on them.  The deer are thick!  The soil quality is different in all of them.  Seems 6-7 years before they are  ready to be walked  and hunted,  very thick before then. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ridge Runner

Thanks very much for the prompt replies.  Guessing there is a problem in the pieces mentioned, as there is no regrowth visible.  Cuttings were from 2-12 or so years ago.  They are all damp/wet bottoms and had done well for many (over 45 years).  Wonder if they have any idea what went wrong?    

 

Treerooster, hey, great name to me at least, as I have always found grouse and woodcock in or near them for many years.   But, well now, it will be interesting to see if the PP can find them!  😊   

 

Know a PP guy nearby who has raised quite a few, but never knew him to chase after Grouse & Woodcock, just Pa Game Commission farm raised  Chinese Chickens!  So, if you happen to have any pics of your PP with real birds such as grouse & WC, I would love to see one.  Would really enjoy showing it to the  nearby PP guy and having some fun!  😈

 

Thanks again.

 

  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Spin
On 9/7/2019 at 3:09 PM, Treerooster said:

 

Call me a mistake guy. I even named my PP after "Tag Alder". Tag Alder Tangle...call name Tag. Speckled just wouldn't cut it.  ☺️

Hey I thought Tag was a great name too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MNice

There's a spot close to me where the DNR used a forestry mulcher to reduce some old and dying alder stands to bare ground. The next year, it all came back as intended. This is the 3rd season after the cut so I'll see what it holds this year. It never did produce before but it was almost completely void of life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ScottGrush

This is me standing in the middle of a golden winged warbler project i.e. tag alder shearing in NE lower Michigan. 

This was cut in the winter of 2013-14 and the picture is from July of 2018. This site was still quite vigorous but showing signs of nearing the end of its life cycle. In other words it was getting that blooming onion look where some (not much) was going horizontal. 

I wonder if your sites were beyond their life cycle and cut too late? 

20180704_231457645_iOS.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Spin

    In east central Wisconsin south of the pine/popple belt alder seems to me to play an important role in cover for grouse. Most of our public lands are low and wet.

There are large areas of ground that are largely dense stands of alder and long dense marsh grass blanketing the bulk of the open ground between the alders.

Willow and red twig dogwood also form dense thickets here and there.

    Quite a bit of the shooting is different from hunting Ruffs further north. Tighter chokes and longer shots seem to come up here. Birds break cover and have to cover

open ground as they head for the alder thickets. Some will even go high and open while they choose to fly over some clumps of heavy cover.

    I run into this in rare areas that have areas recovering from clear cutting hunting woodcock. While thick the new growth (willow, hawthorn, and thorn apple) is only 4 to 6 feet high and birds often fly above it.

Very easy shooting!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WI Outdoor Nut

I am looking at some aerial photos of a spot I deer hunt with tags.  It looks like it was bare ground in 2005.  Some tags started coming in right away and those appear to be nearing the end of their life.  Others are new, ~5 years old and thick and nasty.  Deer love the cover, but it would be tough to walk through. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×