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topdog1961

“Frankenstein” dogs?

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topdog1961

We had a thread on designer breeds recently, but I thought this article might be noteworthy:

 

https://www-m.cnn.com/2019/09/26/world/labradoodle-creator-frankenstein-monster-scli-intl/index.html?r=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cnn.com%2F

 

It explains why Labordoodles were first created, and how much that man now regrets it. 

 

I should thank him, as they have been very good for my underground fence business. My experience with them has been mostly good. 

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max2

I try to live by the old adage of if I have nothing nice to say I say nothing at all. However this time I would like to make an exception.  Where I live I have seen quite a few of these designer bred dogs. To their favor  all have been very nice and friendly. That said they demanded a large some of money if you wanted to purchase one.  Today the same folks who were purchasing these dogs when you ask them where they got their current dogs which could be any breed their reply is always " she or he is a rescue " and now it's a sin purchase a pedigree. How times change..... 

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SLR

I have no experience with these intentionally cross bred dogs. However, the practice is corrupted by money in my opinion. These cross breds, like the labradoodle, are marketed with high priced ads and sold for exorbitant prices, which the market seems to bear. For a while I was seeing large ads in the online NY Times. I say this because the selection process for quality of the breeding stock seems to be non-existent. Contrast that to bird dogs for example, where the pedigrees are salted with champions and proof of quality on public display. On the other hand, the claim that cross breeding two different breeds leads to increased health and temperament problems doesn't ring true. Most of the disease traits are recessive genes or quantitative trait loci and generally would be diluted by cross breeding. So I would expect the opposite on what one gets with close inbreeding. The intentions of the designer breed people may be said to be a good one. There is a need in the dog/pet fancy to produce dogs well suited for the single purpose of being companion dogs and pets. Hence the intention of the original breeder of the labradoodle to produce a pet with low allergy potential and a medium size. The conformation show fancy has many examples of creating breeds with built in health problems and rather ridiculous appearances. Traits like brachycephaly or dogs that can only whelp by C-section. I think this fancy should breed the dogs with the desired traits, which the market shows are wanted by the public, so that they become true breeds and can be bred beyond the F1 generation and become consistent.

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terrym

Pretty well all sporting breeds are a melting pot in the beginning. I would think at some point or rather hope that the Labradoodle breeders would eventually selectively breed out the potential health issue/defects?

But money works. I remember a buddy of mine who was seriously into Beagles telling me if he couldn’t sell the last of a litter all he had to do was double the price then they got snapped up by idiots who thought more money had to mean better. 

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sneem

Recently Reader's Digest had an article on "The Things Your Vet Won't Tell You." My favorite was, "Your  favorite designer dog? It's still just a mutt".

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fishvik

I'm curious does anybody have or know of a labradoodle that is hunted? I have owned a number of lab or chessie/pointing breed crosses. All were pretty good hunting dogs. Three were very good upland and waterfowl dogs, a weimer/chessie, a lab/pointer and a lab/GWP. They all pointed and retrieved, worked at a useable range, and were good waterfowl dogs even in cold, windy conditions. Another, due to an accidental breeding of my wiemer/chessie with a lab was an excellent waterfowl and pheasant dog along at being pretty good on valley quail. He was a flusher with a good nose.  Only one was not a very good family dog, a chessie/GWP cross. All of these dogs were gotten from pounds or friends with puppies they were getting rid of so these were not designer dogs.

 

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Marc Ret

Just spent the last week looking after some friends' 4yo Labradoodle while they were on vacation. I've been around him his whole life but only for short periods at a time. After a week of 24/7 with him, I saw no out of the ordinary characteristics. Sweet, friendly well-mannered pup. Loves to retrieve frisbee/balls and needed lots of activity, like most any of the sporting breeds. The only "crazy" I saw was his hatred of the squirrels that liked to tease him by milling around in front of the picture window (nothing unusual there). 

 

 

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Cooter Brown


I don't understand the derision the Labradoodle gets.  I wonder if it comes down to the name?

 

The ones I've been around have been fine, nice dogs, like Marc said.

 

It would pay to remember that all sporting breeds began with cross breeding, and that any breed can be screwed up with bad breeding practices.

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nobirdshere

I am fine with the Doodles. All but one I've met has been a real sweetheart and make very nice family pets. I would much rather someone seek out something like this than buy a Lab, GSP, Britt, Cocker, Springer, Viszla, Setter, etc., solely for a non-hunting house pet. A lot of breeds gene pools have suffered based on popularity. I see Viszlas and GSPs all the time around my neighborhood and when I inquire, find out none of them hunt. Still, the guy raises the same concern that high popularity leads to haphazard or inconsiderate breeding practices, which has been to the detriment of some of the hunting breeds. The Doodle will likely suffer the same problem with people breeding dogs that shouldn't be bred in order to meet a demand.

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Chukarman

 I pretty much like any dog larger than a house cat.

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BlacknTan

Any outcrossing of gene pools is to the dogs' benefit, IMHO.

 

I had a friend with a Labradoodle, since passed, that he loved very much. He was a very nice, friendly dog. What on God's green earth is wrong with that?

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Brad Eden
On 9/27/2019 at 1:05 PM, Marc Ret said:

Just spent the last week looking after some friends' 4yo Labradoodle while they were on vacation. I've been around him his whole life but only for short periods at a time. After a week of 24/7 with him, I saw no out of the ordinary characteristics. Sweet, friendly well-mannered pup. Loves to retrieve frisbee/balls and needed lots of activity, like most any of the sporting breeds. The only "crazy" I saw was his hatred of the squirrels that liked to tease him by milling around in front of the picture window (nothing unusual there). 

 

Same with the labradoodles and goldendoodles Ive spent time around. Nothing alarmingly weird or more crazy than the many Birddogs I've been around. Generally nice enough dogs.

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