Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
settem

Fried Oysters

Recommended Posts

settem

My family has a long history with fried Oysters for Christmas morning breakfast.
We seem to prefer a light egg wash and cracker meal. 
I’m just curious as to what the rest of you prefer for fried Oysters?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peent

The best oysters I’ve ever had was at a little seafood place near NOLA. Oyster bordelaise at Kenner Seafood.  Another UJer recommended the place to me. I’d like to try making it myself.  Oysters are hard to come by here though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GLS

One of the best cracker meals I've used is one I've made from fresh Saltine crackers pulverized in a blender.  I'll put oysters from the lowcountry of GA/SC against any in the world for taste. Same goes for our wild white or brown shrimp.  I fry with or without a light beer wash and heat peanut oil to 375 F.  I don't crowd the fryer with oysters as I don't want the temp to plunge downward too drastically.  One difference with local oysters is most of the estuaries where they are found in the lowcountry have little if any freshwater influence.  Size of them is not huge as are the ones from other areas in the US.  At one time our area was a major producer of canned oysters.  Over a 100 years ago, L.P. Maggioni employed 5000 workers with 500 watercraft to harvest oysters near the GA/SC borders, north and south of the state lines.  The cannery was later operated under the Daufski Oysters banner.  Gil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tut

The classic here in the south is finely ground saltine crackers and then coarsely ground saltine crackers, beaten eggs in between.  Fried in Canola oil.  Served with tarter sauce or cocktail sauce. 

 

First dip in the saltine cracker meal mixture,  then beaten eggs, then coated with the coarsely ground saltine crackers and put right into the skillet.   

 

Cooked in a skillet under medium heat until browned on both sides and then drained and served warm.  Side dishes are always cole slaw and mashed potatoes.  

 

PS.  Crunchy on the outside and moist and juicy on the inside.  Might actually have some today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quailguy

Only recently up here in Yankeeland have I been able to get fresh oysters. I fry em up with an egg wash followed by fried fish coating. Still cannot get the big choice oysters but they are good.  We never had them for Christmas.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Spiller

Bisquick pancake batter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Snipeaholic

The way we do it at our shop is drain the oysters and roll them in our finely ground breading which is already seasoned and fry them until golden brown. Out of the fryer basket they go into a metal drop pan and then to the container the customer gets. We opt not to put them on paper towels or deli paper in order to keep the crispy as possible. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GLS

I use the raised wire mesh cookie cooling "trays" for draining grease from fried foods.  They come with cookie sheets at WallyWorld.  I agree with the above about using paper towels, kraft paper, etc. being not suited for draining excess cooking oil.  I put newspaper underneath the mesh trays. I use the mesh trays for making wild turkey jerky in the oven as well.  Gil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SelbyLowndes

The only way to mess up a fried oyster is to over batter it.  I like a thin crispy shell and a juicy, not over cooked oyster, myself.  

 

That said, my favorite Thanksgiving and Christmas plate is an oyster casserole with saltines and lots of butter cooked into it.  I believe I'll go heat up a serving of that leftover casserole right now for brunch...SelbyLowndes 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Recoil Rob

My "Home Port" is Norwalk, CT which has a historically abundant oyster population around the Norwalk Islands. Weather permitting I can go harvest my own. My favorite method for maximum crunch is light flour, egg wash dip and then a 50/50 mixture of medium grind cornmeal and panko, deep fry!

 

 

 

July-4-2008.jpg

 

IMG-1330.jpg


IMG-1331.jpg


IMG-1334.jpg


IMG-1336.jpg


IMG-1337.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DocE

Raw Oysters (on the half-shell)  is the only way to go.

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SelbyLowndes

Recoil Rob's pictures look like fried oyster done right to me. Especially the home-made po-boy.

 

When I'm fishing the Gulf coast in winter I usually bring along a sleeve of saltines and a bottle of cocktail sauce in my gear bag.  At low tide along the Suwannee reef and in the Everglades Park where the waters are as clean as any I know, I'll park the boat at an oyster bar and wade around the outside of the bar to pick up a few big singles for a snack.  I always have an oyster knife in my tackle box, so we'll just sit on the gunnel of the boat and crack open the freshest oysters known, place them on a saltine, and cover with cocktail sauce for some real close to nature foraging...SelbyLowndes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GLS
38 minutes ago, SelbyLowndes said:

The only way to mess up a fried oyster is to over batter it.  I like a thin crispy shell and a juicy, not over cooked oyster, myself.  

 

That said, my favorite Thanksgiving and Christmas plate is an oyster casserole with saltines and lots of butter cooked into it.  I believe I'll go heat up a serving of that leftover casserole right now for brunch...SelbyLowndes 

^Wife's family recipe ("scalloped oysters") and great this time of the year.  Another great tradition in this neck of the woods is an oyster roast.  Before the days of propane cookers, we would steam  shovel loads of oysters onto a metal plate, often a huge rotary saw blade, supported on concrete blocks with an oak fire below.  The oysters would be covered with crocus (burlap) sack soaked with water.  Most folks use propane fired steamers these days, but one advantage of the wood fired cooking is the smoke eliminates sand gnats which will suck the blood out of a rock when temps hover in the high 60s, low 70s.   Great social  event in these parts.    The pros bring their own oyster knives. Gil

oyster roast ellis.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sharptail grouse

Anybody have any good mountain oyster recipes? I've just had them fried....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
settem
12 hours ago, sharptail grouse said:

Anybody have any good mountain oyster recipes? I've just had them fried....

Different species altogether, but I have eaten them in a hole in the wall bar in Cawker City, Ks..

They were pretty damn good...!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×