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Brad Eden

Road Kill

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Brad Eden

JoAnn called me earlier while on the way to a book club meeting in town to tell me there was a small deer lying on the main road just up from the house. I went to take a look and found a small button buck on the side of the road. I thought it was dead until I walked up on it. It was alive but barely. Just heart wrenching seeing it suffering. I pulled it off the road into the snow on the side. It looked pretty messed up and if it was dead I probably would have left it and called a friend who might want it for coyote bait. I called the local warden who I know, and left a message. He called back a while later and gave me the green light to dispatch it and he would come by my house tomorrow and tag it. I only had my .25 Beretta handgun with me, but one pop behind the ear put it out of its misery. Another guy stopped and helped me heave it into my pickup bed. Its 10° out so no way I was gonna try and field dress it, I put it on a tarp on the unheated garage floor and put a thick quilt over it. At the very least tomorrow Ill check to see if the backstraps are intact and will take those. Depending on the condition I may skin and try and salvage the  rear quarters if it's not frozen solid by then. Poor little bugger. 

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gunsrus

Sad to hear but hope you get something edible so it wasn't in vain . It really is gut wrenching seeing an animal suffering .

 

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max2

You did the right thing.  

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kgb

Curious to see how it turns out, I would think it all salvageable, that wasn't damaged in the impact.

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Mike da Carpenter

Where I work, the police used to call me when there was a car/deer accident and I would get there quickly, that is if the person who hit it didn’t want to claim the deer.  Usually if it was before 10 am, I’d get the salvageable meat off of it and get it to the Chef we have here and we all would be eating well for lunch.  If it was after 10 am, I’d still get all the salvageable meat off, but it would usually go in the freezer and we would take it out to make meals for the crew when we had some down time.  I hate to see anything go to waste.

 

Over the past couple years, there has been a pretty big turnover in the police department and with that, others have made connections and have taken over the duties of picking up the deer and doing what they want with it.  Very few, if any, of the deer get distributed amongst the employees now.  Honestly, I have no idea what happens to the meat, but I have my suspicions.  I still get thanked for doing it for so many years.  That was the only time many of the people ever had the opportunity to try venison.  Even named our kitchen the “Roadkill Cafe”.

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Brad Eden

IMG_3913.JPG

 

Will start skinning later and see what I have.

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WI Outdoor Nut

A good choice fore sure.  A few years back I saw a button buck in a field not able to keep it head up.  That deer had broken legs and I dispatched it. 

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Irishwhistler

When I was a young Game Warden on the  job, part of our many duties was taking care of  deer in cured or killed by motor vehicles.  We would go to the scene at all hours of the day and night to investigate the cause.  We would fill out a DKIR (deer kill incident report) once the mechanic of injury / death was determined.    If the deer was still alive and badly injured, we would dispatch it on the scene.  If the driver that struck the deer was present, we would ask them if they wanted the deer and issue them a copy of the DKIR as their proof of legal possession.  The DKIR information was used to determine the injury and mortality rates of deer due to collisions with motor vehicles.  The data collected also was used to determine placement of deer crossing road signs in areas with high frequency of such incidents.

 

There were many days where I responded to multiples of such incidents and I recall having responded to 15 such incidents in one day.  Back then, it was rare to have the opportunity to have another person to help load the deer for removal and I know many officers from my era of service that suffered serious back related in juries from doing so, fortunately I wasn't one of them.

 

In cases where the driver that struck the deer did not want it, the agency maintained a "venison list".  The venison list consisted of contact numbers for fish and game clubs that signed up to receive such deer for their annual game dinners.  If the deer was determined to be salvageable by the responding warden, he was responsible for field dressing the deer and getting it to the club contact person  for the club's use.  The club contact would be expected to pay 30 cents per pound (estimated dressed weight) and the check was made payable to the general fund of the state treasurer.  It always pissed me off that our agency did all of the work and the funds collected went into the general fund rather than directly to our agency for conservation related needs.

 

I had some very interesting cases involving motor vehicle struck deer that were still alive upon my arrival on the scene .😩

 

Cheers,

Irishwhistler ☘️🇮🇪🇺🇸

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charlo slim
25 minutes ago, Irishwhistler said:

  Back then, it was rare to have the opportunity to have another person to help load the deer for removal and I know many officers from Myers of service that suffered serious back related in juries from doing so, fortunately I wasn't one of them.

 

Must be a common problem -- I've noticed that Montana warden trucks all have an ATV  type  electric winch mounted atop the headache rack.  

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pa'tridge hunters

The deer are still moving around here. Just not that much snow to slow them down. Remember, when one crosses in front of you there's usually another one or two right behind.

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SelbyLowndes

I have a friend here in town who picks up roadkill deer.  Not from need because he's well off (defined as anybody not as poor as me), but he and his family eat a lot of it.  No rules at all here in GA that I'm aware of, and plenty of deer in the ditches.  I've been with him right here in town when he has spotted a deer alongside a busy local road.  He spun around in a u-turn and pulled up on the sidewalk in front of the church where the deer lay.  The temperature was too high to suit me and the doe looked a little on the swole-up side for my taste,  but out he jumped and and loaded the corpse onto the the rack he keeps on the back of his Suburban just for this purpose.  I refused dinner invitations from him for a year after that...SelbyLowndes

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max2

Here's a little story I heard earlier this yr. A lady had hit  or come upon a fresh road kill. A man stopped and asked her if she needed any help. Her response was could he help her load it into her car.  He asked her would you like me to gut it for you ? She replied no thank you I will do it when I get home as it tends to make more of a mess in the car.

 

Nothing wrong with road kill they actually at times taste best as for me a feeling of nothing is wasted comes over me.  

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max2
2 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

IMG_3913.JPG

 

Will start skinning later and see what I have.

I see you have your helper out there with ya . man I miss those days .

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MNice

When opportunity presents, why not. I have a friend whose primary source of protein is road kill venison. Where he lives, along the North Shore of Lake Superior, you could feed the entire  community with road kill venison. 

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Brad Eden

Took out the Backstraps, they look pretty good. Soaking them in cold ice water in fridge. Since I wasn't able to field dress him last night I'm not gonna even check the inner tenderloins I don't think.  Those are the first to get tainted and will be the size of a banana on this small deer. Even on a cold garage floor in well below freezing temps he still retained a lot of heat. Gonna wait for the warden to come and tag it and will then see what I can get off the hind quarters. His front end feels a bit crunchy.

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