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MUSTANGER7

DASH HARD BOILED EGG COOKER - GREAT

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MUSTANGER7

My daughter gave me a Dash Hard Boiled Egg Cooker for Xmas, if you like hard boiled eggs you'll love it. I give my dogs half of a hard boiled egg with each meal, and eat a lot myself, was a real pain doing it so the shells would peel off easily, ended up with pock marked eggs and it was a chore to say the least. With this cooker I can peel the 6 eggs mine cooks in about 2min and they look perfect, just a heads up.

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marysburg

I do mine in the Instant Pot.  They peel like they've got zippers.

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WABBIT-SLAYER
2 hours ago, MUSTANGER7 said:

My daughter gave me a Dash Hard Boiled Egg Cooker for Xmas, if you like hard boiled eggs you'll love it. I give my dogs half of a hard boiled egg with each meal, and eat a lot myself, was a real pain doing it so the shells would peel off easily, ended up with pock marked eggs and it was a chore to say the least. With this cooker I can peel the 6 eggs mine cooks in about 2min and they look perfect, just a heads up.

Do you know where she got it from?

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1971snipe

We have a Krups that we ordered on line.  It cooks up to 6 eggs at a time.  

The eggs aren't in the water, they sit above the water, and there is a vent for the steam to escape.   The more eggs you cook, the less water you use, and the less time it takes.  Fewer eggs, more water is used, and a longer cooking time til done.  I haven't quite figured out the principle.  Also, there's a small plastic spike that's for putting a pinhole in each egg prior to cooking.  So far I haven't had the nerve to see what happens if the eggs are not "vented" with the pinhole.  

Anyway, my wife says I think too much, especially for a hard boiled egg cooker.  

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Birdcountry70
12 hours ago, marysburg said:

I do mine in the Instant Pot.  They peel like they've got zippers.

This.  Shells can just be popped off easily every time. Gotta use the rack thingy that keeps them up off the bottom though.

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Dave Erickson

My wife gave me the Dash egg cooker for Christmas. I love it! 

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strato-caster

Fresh eggs have an air (gas) pocket that rises- eggs are typically bought at retail stored large end up... if you prick this end, the gas escapes as the egg expands during cooking, resulting in a perfectly shaped hard boiled specimen. This is why you will see a stream of tiny bubbles being released from said pin prick if you still submerge you eggs in water and cook them the old fashioned way. This is why you have been told that older eggs are better for boiling, as the eggs naturally bleed off the gas through the permeable egg shell over time. On a partly aged egg that you haven't pricked, you will often see the resulting flat cap on the thick end after peeling, as the gas had not fully escaped prior to cooking but the internal pressure never reached the point of catastrophically cracking the shell, although there may be signs of stress cracks . 

 

To answer the question at hand, by not pricking the shell of a fresh egg prior to cooking, you risk having the shell crack under pressure and having the contents spill out in an amorphous glob as it expands and cooks, resulting in an atrocious, alien looking blob not suitable for anything that requires a whole cooked egg, like deviled eggs.

 

I am not sure if anything worse that this scenario can happen short of microwaving on high for several minutes... any brave souls out there (probably best if you are a confirmed bachelor) want to give it the old college try? Inquiring minds just need to know...

 

Hopefully that is more than you really needed to know.

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strato-caster

orgot to add-

 

If you like the DASH hard boiled egg cooker, you will equally enjoy the DASH single waffle iron ($10). Yes, it works swell for waffles but really shines when you put it to other uses like  instantly baking a Pillsbury Cinnabon Grand cinnamon roll in 2 minutes without having to fire up the big oven for 20 minutes or making a perfectly panninied Cuban sandwich out of Kaiser rolls...

 

My 15 year old daughter gives them out as Xmas and birthday gifts to her teammates and friends and they love them. Keeps them from getting into trouble in the kitchen at home and it's amazing some of the things they have dreamed up while cooking with them. Best of all, it is a reasonably priced gift to give. S'mores anyone?

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Cooter Brown

I have an old Revere Ware sauce pan with a stamped stainless colander made by the same mfg.  The colander fits down in the pan and the lid fits in the colander.  It all came in the same set.  I put an inch of water in the pan and bring to a boil.  Six eggs will fit in the colander--put the lid on and steam away.  Works great, but I think steaming the eggs might make them a little tougher, but not enough to matter.

 

I also have fewer issues with peeling that I did when I boiled them.  I don't get enough exploding eggs to justify poking a hole in them.

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erik meade

We almost always have eggs boiled in the fridge, ready to grab.  I just make sure they are old eggs, boil them, and then chill them in ice water right after.  Never have a peeling problem.

 

We have an insta-pot. almost never gets used.

 

Maybe I should get a steamer - seem cheap enough.  But then you got to store it, and clean it and and and

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Marc Ret

Boiled eggs are one of those snacks I always keep around, never had an issue with doing them on the stovetop. I've been tweaking my recipe for pickled eggs with a zip (Jalepenos, habaneros, hot sauce and more) the last few months and finally have the flavor where I want it. Gave a few quarts away for Christmas to friends who've tried them and bugged me for more. 

 

 

image.jpeg

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erik meade

Marc,  I think I have a new hobby. 

 

You gonna share the recipe/ procedure?  Or is that a secret?

I always get a-scared of botulism anytime I think about canning.  - but frankly do not even know enough to know if that is a ridiculous worry. 

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Speaks

That looks pretty cool, just ordered one. The omelet feature looks pretty cool also, make one nearly every morning but lately have missed a bunch of breakfasts not having time, this should solve that. 

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bobman

If you break a hard boiled egg in half you will find a spoon is shaped perfectly to run around the sides and then scoop out the 1/2 egg in perfect shape .....no sticking to the shell

 

I eat them like that every morning but I’m going to get one of those dash cookers and try it

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Marc Ret
53 minutes ago, erik meade said:

Marc,  I think I have a new hobby. 

 

You gonna share the recipe/ procedure?  Or is that a secret?

I always get a-scared of botulism anytime I think about canning.  - but frankly do not even know enough to know if that is a ridiculous worry. 

 

No secret, Erik. Happy to share. No canning involved to scare ya. 

 

- 3 Cups White Vinegar 

- 3/4 Cup White Sugar

- 2 TSP Red Pepper Flakes

- 2 TSP Dill Weed

- 2 TSP Sea Salt

- 2 TSP Pickling Spices

- 5 Cloves

- 3 to 5 Jalapeños (sliced); Number depends on the size of the Jalapeño, I leave the seeds in for a bit more heat. 

- 3 to 4 Habaneros (sliced); Again, I leave the seeds in. 

- One small onion (sliced)

- Cholula Hot Sauce. It probably totals 5-6 TBSP but I don't measure. I add 2 to 3 TBSP when simmering everything, then add more (shake well) the next day after it's cooled in the fridge. I just look for the color of the brine to go from diluted to the color in the pic. 

 

Simmer all the above for 15 minutes or so. While brine and eggs are warm, add a ladle full of the mix to a quart jar, place three eggs, add more brine and repeat till the jar is full. A large mouth quart jar works great and holds nine eggs. The amount of brine will fully cover 14 eggs- 9 in a quart jar and 5 in a pint jar. I fill the jars as full as I can with brine and then screw the lids on. Rinse off any overflow of brine and put in the refrigerator. I don't start eating them till they've been in the fridge for a minimum of a week. 

 

Hope you enjoy them. 

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