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Millriver

Fiddleheads

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RMH

Blah! I think they taste like Brussel sprouts and dirt. Dirt I do not mind but Brussel sprouts are beyond the pale. 

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Brad Eden
6 minutes ago, RMH said:

Blah! I think they taste like Brussel sprouts and dirt. Dirt I do not mind but Brussel sprouts are beyond the pale. 

Roasted Brussel Sprouts are a new rage. Takes guts to eat them in public, sorta like avacado....unless you sport a man bun.

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RMH
3 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

Roasted Brussel Sprouts are a new rage. Takes guts to eat them in public, sorta like avacado....unless you sport a man bun.

If I had enough hair for a man bun I'd just have a ponytail. I would have the nerve for that but never brussel sprouts again, or fiddleheads.

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Brad Eden
47 minutes ago, RMH said:

If I had enough hair for a man bun I'd just have a ponytail. I would have the nerve for that but never brussel sprouts again, or fiddleheads.

I’m working on an old man pony tail right now. I’ve started wearing a red bandana as a head band. My wife told me I’m starting to look like Keith Richards.

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Millriver

From Fiddleheads to man buns and Keith Richards. You’ll only find that here on UJ folks!

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atticus

Ive never had Fiddleheads so I'll try them this spring.  My local grocery usually carries them but --in case they don't this year-- can someone post pictures and info on what to look for when picking?  I know --sort of--what they look like, but better safe. 

 

I hope they taste like Brussels sprouts which are my favorite veggie --who knew I was so "hip"?  A few years back, when I started watching my weight more, my favorite football game snack was a bowl of fried Brussels sprouts with salt and garlic powder.  My wife hates when I make them, roasted or fried, due to the smell. 

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Millriver

Ostrich ferns, U shaped smooth stalks. Usually found along riverbanks. Don’t pick them all, leave some for “seed”.

37BE2557-C49D-4C66-B2C2-C2D52CDDC1DD.jpeg

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406dn
1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

Roasted Brussel Sprouts are a new rage. Takes guts to eat them in public, sorta like avacado....unless you sport a man bun.

 

I like Brussel Sprouts any way you can fix them. I don't think a man bun is possible at this point.

 

Out here, it's wild asparagus that catches my interest in the spring.  

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Big Al

All those years in Michigan picking morels and wild asparagus and no one ever told me about fiddleheads.  It's amazing how you don't know what you don't know.

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Millriver
4 minutes ago, Big Al said:

All those years in Michigan picking morels and wild asparagus and no one ever told me about fiddleheads.  It's amazing how you don't know what you don't know.

And I’ve never seen wild asparagus! 

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Big Al
17 minutes ago, Millriver said:

And I’ve never seen wild asparagus! 

 

You do your hunting for wild asparagus in late June to early July.  The asparagus stalks have died and dried out and their tan color contrasts the green grass.  This makes it real easy to find.  Cruise down country roads and watch the fence line.  You'll eventually see some.  Write down or gps the spot and then next spring go back and pick.  The least traveled the road the better. Less competition.

 

I had about four patches that I picked every spring.  Usually get about three to four cuttings each spring.  A couple of the patches were known by others so it was first come first served.  Wild asparagus is better than domestic.  Stalks are thinner and are a little more tender.

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406dn

Out here irrigation ditches are prime locations to look for asparagus. Once you know where some grows, you just need a knife and a bag. You can go back to the same areas every couple days as the stalks are growing at varying rates. By the time it gets late into May, most of the stalks are too thick and tough for the table. 

 

I wish that I was confident enough to gather morels,, there are quite a few of them, I think,, around here. But, while I like mushrooms,,,not enough to get it wrong.

 

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Jazz4Brazo

I don't know wild mushrooms and won't take the chance except for morels as they are easy to identify with high assurance...love fiddle heads (newly introduced a few years back and they now show up at grocers for a short while so don't have to worry about picking wild)...would love to try wild asparagus one day...who knew??

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Big Al

Wild asparagus is spread by the birds eating the seeds then sitting on the fence and dropping the seed.  This is why there is so much of it along fences.

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Big Al
29 minutes ago, 406dn said:

Out here irrigation ditches are prime locations to look for asparagus. Once you know where some grows, you just need a knife and a bag. You can go back to the same areas every couple days as the stalks are growing at varying rates. By the time it gets late into May, most of the stalks are too thick and tough for the table. 

 

I wish that I was confident enough to gather morels,, there are quite a few of them, I think,, around here. But, while I like mushrooms,,,not enough to get it wrong.

 

Interesting about irrigation ditches.  I've never looked for asparagus in Montana.  Perhaps I'll give it a try. 

Don't worry about morels.  There isn't any other mushroom that looks like them.  Go online and look at some pictures.  If you have access to them don't pass up one of life's pleasures.

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