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gaberdeen

another new adventure

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gaberdeen

a good friend from work just purchased 80 acres in upstate NY near Norwich. Its a combo of fields and woods and is surrounded on 3 sides by state forest. We are heading up next week to post the land and begin some improvements. The state land was cut 7 years ago and the other piece was logged 4 yrs ago according to the seller who says he sees lots of grouse and woodcock around the property. We will be installing some food plots for deer hunting. Any advice for putting in food plots? I'm thinking a brassica planting the beginning of August and then a winter rye seeding in early sept.

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SelbyLowndes

Enjoy yourself!  I can't offer any advice on New York food plots, but your Brassica/Winter Rye idea sounds reasonable to me.  Good luck with the hunting...SelbyLowndes

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Clueless1

We have tried many things.  Being that it's a few hours (I'm guessing??) away you want something that is fairly maintenance free.  I've found brassicas to be tough to keep up with, and they are annuals so need planting every year.  Had one fantastic year with them but then when I looked at the amount of fertilizer and lime put down and the time spent it just wasn't worth it.

 

Take this for what it's worth, some clueless guy on the internet.  We have plots that are about 45 minutes away from home.  Even with that short distance it can be tough to spend the necessary time when life gets in the way.  Plus with dogs I find myself wanting to spend less and less time tending plots.  What we have found that works out great for us.

 

This is what we've pretty much settled on:

Labor Day weekend we plant the plots that need done.  We use winter rye and clover.  That plot will be hit quite a bit that fall as the rye can take a pounding while the clover establishes.  From there on out it is mowing that plot 2-3 times a year.  We get about 4-5 years out of each plot before replanting and we've got 4-5 spots that we try to rotate so we are only planting one maybe two a year. 

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WI Outdoor Nut

Gaber - depending on the year, we run 12-16 foodplots.  This year I think we will be at 13.  This is on 5 different properties with all sorts of ground.  The easiest (but still work) would be clover.  It can take a beating from wildlife, is pretty forgiving and generally speaking low cost compared to some others.  With clover, now is the time to plant, preferably right before a rain.  I would start with a mow, as low as you can.  Wait a few days (or rake if an option), then do your kill step (roundup).  Wait a few days then turn the ground.  You don't need to turn much, just a 1/2" or so.  Plant with clover, compact if possible.  This is ideal if you have all the right tools.  If not, I have had success skipping some of these steps and often results will show.  You will need to mow 2-3x's per year to keep weeds down and keep the clover from getting woody.  I am more than willing to help with anything you need. 

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WI Outdoor Nut

When you want to get more complicated, start to look at brassica's.  These are more temperamental with soils (think PH), need a bit more soil prep, but often are the go to food source later in the year.  My brassica food plots were going strong even after I pulled my cameras in early January.  It has taken me years to get the results I have wanted, but not can do it pretty consistently, pending rain. 

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gaberdeen

Thanks guys! I will definitely utilize your expertise! WI those plots look awesome!

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ThornApple

Gary, if there is a corner Aspen stand in one of the fields, go cut all the tall ones down.  They will throw suckers and multiply for future bird cover.

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max2

If I had 80 acres in NY I would just work with what is on the land and not really bother with food plots . If you live there it might work  but if not there are so many folks that hunt deer & turkeys that all you would be doing is feeding deer and folks would hunt it when your not there . Even if land is posted it just tends to make bad feelings between locals and new landowners.  This piece your friend has purchased though is surrounded by state land so makes sense to post it all the way around . When folks get lost in the state woods they will be able to follow your posted signs out. Just some of my observations living in NY. 

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spring

Most of my trips to NY have been to NYC, though I love the Adirondacks; absolutely beautiful all-around that part of the state. Truly stunning how different much of NY is compared to what so many around the country imagine. 

That said, with so many people living in the City and thinking that's the way life should be, or is elsewhere, it does create interesting perspectives. I remember years ago I was talking on the phone with a woman in NYC that worked with a financial company I did business with. In our conversation, we talked about our upcoming weekends. I told her I was going deer hunting here in Georgia and told her a bit about it. I'll never forget her curiosity, and even confusion, as she tried to imagine what I was about to do in our rural world when she said, "How do you keep the kids out of the woods?"  Perspectives are an interesting thing. 

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Skybuster

There is a good reason for the title "The Empire State." It's beautiful and like Spring suggested, those who have never been there have no idea what a stunning place it is.

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gaberdeen

Plots are coming together. We mowed and a few days later sprayed with round up and 2,4-d. We will go up Saturday to see what kind of results we’re getting and touch up spray any areas we need to. 2nd week of July the plots will get disc. Our goal is to plant by Aug 1st. We have a mix of clover, brassicas and winter rye.

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drummer's stump

If you want to improve grouse cover you need to make edge habitat, and chick rearing cover. Hens with chicks like areas with native forbs and sedges over food plots, by planting food plots all you are doing is increasing the deer population which will compete with grouse for late season food. The native seed bank is probably still there, clear out the invasive species, burn out the grass bring up the PH level and let it sit, or plant native seed mix. Most grouse live on about 10 acres, so by making several small irregular shaped blocks made up of clearings, late-successional habitat for nesting, upland grassland/meadows for chick rearing, and traditional early successional habitat then you will have a spot hunt. Honeysuckle, buckthorn, bittersweat, and barberry are the enemy of any good habitat. High bush cranberry, blueberry, hawthorn, raspberry, wild strawberry, dewberry, resistant American beech are what you want. 

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mccuha
On 5/31/2020 at 7:51 AM, spring said:

Most of my trips to NY have been to NYC, though I love the Adirondacks; absolutely beautiful all-around that part of the state. Truly stunning how different much of NY is compared to what so many around the country imagine. 

That said, with so many people living in the City and thinking that's the way life should be, or is elsewhere, it does create interesting perspectives. I remember years ago I was talking on the phone with a woman in NYC that worked with a financial company I did business with. In our conversation, we talked about our upcoming weekends. I told her I was going deer hunting here in Georgia and told her a bit about it. I'll never forget her curiosity, and even confusion, as she tried got imagine what I was about to do in our rural world when she said, "How do you keep the kids out of the woods?"  Perspectives are an interesting thing. 

We had a group from my church go to NYC to have bible school for an area in the inner city.  Some of the kids so fascinated about tractors and wanted to know if I had one.  I showed them some pics I had on the phone and us plowing.  They just couldn’t wrap there brain around it.   I’m sure I’d be the same way having to live in a big city my entire life 

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bmeador

Get soil tests done. Virginia Extension Agency does it cheaply here. Tell the plants you want to plant. Spread fertilizer and lime as directed. It is a BUNCH cheaper starting out right!  I know...

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Tim Frazier

NY is overrated! 

 

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