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Brad Eden

Sentiments on Killing

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Alec Sparks

If I never killed another thing I'd be happy. Training dogs for a living, that ain't going to happy any time soon though.

Farm birds....not so worried about but really get absolutely no enjoyment out of it.

Wild birds.....no interest in killing them.

Mammals, both big and small: No desire to hunt/kill what so ever.

Fishing: Catch and release only thankyouverymuch.

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RookieEP
Man-  To think that neither Crawford nor Ron had anything to do w/ all this debauchery is amazing.

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Uplander

I'm a bit late to this party, and have no stake in the big game threads that seem to have feathers ruffled.

My own, personal, take on hunting, and fishing, is that yes, I am a little sad when I kill something.  Why?  Don't know.  

Maybe because the older I get the more I realize that every spark of life on the planet is, in its own way, a unique, never to pass this way again, make the most of it opportunity granted to every living thing.

Even recognizing that the way of the world is that some of those sparks exist by snuffing out others doesn't change the fact that when I consider that I'm personally extinguishing a living entity's one shot at existence, it's hard not to feel a little sad.

I'm sure that way of looking at it is a little much for some people, and that's fine.  To each his own....

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WPG Gizmo

This may sound cold to some but I hunt and I fully expect to kill things when I hunt.  

I enjoy the hunt so if I do not kill game during it that is fine with me but when the time comes the gun comes up and the target falls be it large or small game I feel no remorse.  

After every kill I do take a moment though and say a small prayer of thanks for the bounty I have been given.  

The one thing that bothers me is not making a clean kill I owe my prey that respect and strive to do so every time.

I was taught a very long time ago not to aim a gun at something I was not willing to kill. To me that means if you are not willing to kill what you are pointing gun at then you should not be hunting.

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ccavacini

I do believe I have changed over the years...it's gone from killing game to being around the dogs...

I would feel guilty only if I didn't eat what I kill.

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northern_hunting_mom

I feel respect and gratitude for anything I kill. Some species are not on my list to point a gun at. I don't feel less of anyone who does. I do feel a rush when I kill but its not the killing that gives me that feeling. Victory is there but I do not feel like its a competition between me and the animal or trophy scores. The victory is more in providing. The gender of the animal killed does not have a bearing on my personal joys and devils.

The respect I have for an animal that is killed demands of me that it be used, if not by me then by someone. It also means that I be a part of that black magic that makes a dead animal into food and/or clothing.

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jmooney

It sounds cliche at times but I say this with all sincerity, I go for the experience, to see the dogwork, to see the wood, to smell, to taste, to feel, mess about with nice guns, spend time with friends, and time alone.  I'm wired that way,  I can't resist the call of the mountains and woods.  I can't sum it up better than Gene Hill when he said "I just like being there".  

I do feel some remorse when I kill, but it's out of respect for animal that I feel that way.   I view it as a choice to participate fully in the food chain and the circle of life.  As our society progressed we have the option of buying our meat and not having to be bothered or face the killing and butchering of what we consume.  I have no problem if others don't want to kill but I view it as the ultimate way to commune with nature and become a part of the full cycle of things.  

I'm glad I'm not the only one who feels differently about various creatures.  I would hunt most animals, I don't go out of my way to hunt anything but birds.  I won't ever hunt bears.  My reasons are very personal and spiritual.    I don't view other animals as being lesser than bears, not at all, that's not why I wouldn't hunt them.

I think to each his or her own on this one.  Killing is one of the most personal acts that you can perform, therefore there is no right or wrong (laws and bag limits aside) only what is right for you.

As a not directly related aside. I and other's have mentioned the food chain.  I hate when people say they are at the top of the food chain.  It  may seem that we are at the top but that position was awarded not earned because we have weapons and tools.  Take those away and we are members of the food chain but certainly not the top.  Last time I checked there are plenty of creatures that can make quick work of a human with little or no effort.  I'm always careful how I word it and my standard answer when someone asks how I can hunt is that I choose to participate fully in the food chain.

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Guest
Anyone who believes that they are the "top of the food chain," may spend time in "the woods," but not in real wilderness. Go do an extended back-country trip in grizzly country, or in places where the mountain lion populations are thriving - I bet you'll feel differently about your superiority. It's a completely different feeling when you're in the backcountry with things that are bigger than you and can, and will, eat you.

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Ben Hong
Hunting necessarily implies killing. I love to hunt, I love to watch my dogs work, I love the bush, I love the meat that I am sometimes rewarded with, but that does not imply that I like killing. A man would have to be a real hardcase if he doesn't feel a bit of remorse at the taking of a life. I don't have hunting partners like that.

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Lars

I still feel remorse about killing a muskrat in Canada when I was a kid. Just because I had a gun and for the sake of killing something with it. It just sat there and I killed it. Imagine that, it still haunts me after all these years and all the kills I've made since.

I always feel a little sad after a kill but I also feel more alive.

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Bryan Lee

I enjoy all aspects of the hunt, including the moment I pull the trigger and an animal dies. BUT I don't have to kill to have enjoyed a day in the field hunting.

I only hunt animals that I like to eat and I guess that is a substantial part of the reason I hunt.

A couple of seasons ago I was dove hunting with a buddy. The farmer had told us to feel free to kill any groundhogs that we encountered. Well, as I was walking along some standing corn, up popped a chuck and I nailed it at close range.

There it was deader than hell and me with no intention of trying to eat it. I truly felt AWFUL. I guess I had done the farmer a favor, but it sure felt like murder to me.....

I guess it's a thin line that we walk sometimes......

Bryan

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nobirdshere
Anyone who believes that they are the "top of the food chain," may spend time in "the woods," but not in real wilderness.

Indeed. Oddly (or perhaps not), I've also never felt "dominion" over animals when swimming in an ocean.

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PartridgeCartridge

Fishing: Catch and release only thankyouverymuch.

I'm sure you mean torture and release, right? Aren't you terrifying that fish just to release it for you or someone else to terrify it again? And for what,  your very own simple and selfish pleasure?

Of course you are.

I'm a die hard flyfisherman and release hundreds of precious wild fish every year but I make no pretense as to what we are really doing in catch and release. It might be conservation based but it still amounts to torture for your pleasure.

It is not a higher moral ground.

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Guest
Fishing: Catch and release only thankyouverymuch.

I'm sure you mean torture and release, right? Aren't you terrifying that fish just to release it for you or someone else to terrify it again? And for what,  your very own simple and selfish pleasure?

Of course you are.

I'm a die hard flyfisherman and release hundreds of precious wild fish every year but I make no pretense as to what we are really doing in catch and release.

It is not a higher moral ground.

JMO

I release all but a very few bass and would release them all but it is my wife's favorite fish.  Panfish I keep for the fryer.  Snapper, grouper, wahoo, tuna and a few others are coming home with the old man.  The bass I release because they are pressured too hard and I believe I have seen a real loss of aggressiveness in them  over the past forty years and especially since fishing for them became so popular.

Now, to hunting, I have come from a youngster who shot everything that moved to an old coot who is a little reluctant to do much killing.  I hunt lots of pen raised birds and after you have shot a couple of hundred there is little sport in it.  I like to invite friends and let them shoot and guide occasionally on the local preserve so much of the time I'm not even carrying a gun.  I have said before on here that I have actually found two wild coveys this year and didn't even have the temptation to shoot at them.  I don't deer hunt but I wish more people did, we're over run with them.  I have a den of fox living in the woods beside me and enjoy seeing them.  Coyotes and racoons I have no problem killing.  Makes no sense and I don't even attempt to figure it out anymore.

Any game animal killed in season and within ethical hunting standards is fine with me even if I don't choose to hunt that particular game.  We'd better stick together because I think our sport is going to come under severe attack in the future and this is not political, I just believe people in urban areas have no conception of hunting is really about.

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pa'tridge hunters

"Hunting necessarily implies killing. I love to hunt, I love to watch my dogs work, I love the bush, I love the meat that I am sometimes rewarded with, but that does not imply that I like killing. A man would have to be a real hardcase if he doesn't feel a bit of remorse at the taking of a life. I don't have hunting partners like that."

Exactly! I wish I'd said that. :upside:

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