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Another misguided policy


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Kentucky

The 2008 mail carrier survey results showed quail numbers continuing to decline across much of the state, thus hunters should expect a season comparable to last year. The western agricultural region of the state continues to hold the most quail. The Peabody WMA continues to be the public land hot spot with reclaimed mine ground in eastern Kentucky following close behind. State small game biologist Ben Robinson also reported that Kentucky recently embarked on a massive 10-year quail restoration plan across the state.

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with reclaimed mine ground in eastern Kentucky following close behind

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there was a article in Gun Dog magazine years ago that spoke very favorably of the quail populations on these recovered strip mines its a well kept secret

Bobman, Shussssh

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You ever notice how the anti nuke people always tip toe around the fact that France took the technology we developed tweaked it a little bit and have enjoyed 80% of their power from nuclear.

Without any problems

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bobman,

   Nice job of backing up your arguments.   I do think coal companies, oil companies and alike wouldn't be as involved in reclamation without the pressure/laws brought on by the "greenies".  With one extreme trying to shut down all industry and the other trying to increase profits with little or no reguard for the environment, as usual the right path is somewhere in the middle.

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bobman,

   Nice job of backing up your arguments.   I do think coal companies, oil companies and alike wouldn't be as involved in reclamation without the pressure/laws brought on by the "greenies".  With one extreme trying to shut down all industry and the other trying to increase profits with little or no reguard for the environment, as usual the right path is somewhere in the middle.

I agree I'm just tired of the one sided bashing, 50% of the folks on this board are running their computers ( and everything else) on coal.

Reclamation is viable and successful yet the hard core left wants to demonize them, we are a part of this ecosystem and our mark will be there.

Its easy to demonize mining yet subdivisions, walmarts ( you name it) do far more damage to the ecology and get no attention  and the area they take never ever gets reclaimed.

everytime gowdey turns on his lights, opens his fridge or enjoys his air conditioning its courtesy of coal miners.

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Bobman,

That argument is as tired as the extremes on the other side--as if there is no other way to do business than to bulldoze a mountain inside out.

Reclamation is simply damage control. The industry web site makes it sound as though the land had been improved. I don't think that's the case. Do you?

How's the fishing for little native brookies in this new "diverse" ecosystem?

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There's always the issue of providing energy for the country's needs--but how that is done seems to be the question some have.

For some, people, it's not possible to question methods or mitigations without being labeled as anti...anti jobs, anti-energy...or the tired old "do you live in a grass hut, wear fur, eat only what you killed or planted" etc. response gets trotted out.  

Give me a break.  

Mining is going to occur.  How it is done is a fair question.  It's impossible to claim that there are no impacts.

We'll see a lot of this in the months and years to come, as the past administration stopped enforcing many requirements that would have allowed  mining to occur in a more sustainable manner.  

I'm not sure restoration is possible with some mining operations.  

I don't see a tame quail population on what used to be a forested mountain top (and will become forested again in the future--thus say goodbye to the quail) as a true restoration.  The way mountain top mining is conducted precludes restoration to anything approaching what is was before.

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tame quail?? show me the evidence they are tame

you are the last person I would expect to see bashing a DNR approved program but political ajenda supercedes all I guess

but you are correct it will become forested again and then gee other than being shorter .....

reclamation is "damage control" wow no one knew that

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I like wind power. No end to the force of the wind created by the convection of the hot air that blows around.

Build more windmills, ought to have one in view of every set of eyes in the US.

Gowdey mentioned voters, sheeple, most can be led, fed and fattened on hyperbole, ain't no way you're going to talk them into nuclear power, they grew up/were filled in by the early greenies screaming doom and gloom at the shortcomings and threats, real or imagined, of the early reactors. At least 1 or 2 generations away from that here.

I have been watching this thread and have no dog in this fight.  As far as coal, I look at the data, and:

(1) Since there is no data (absolutely none) that supports the glo-bull warming myth, I say why not use coal?

(2) On the other hand, I do not live in West Va.  I have no data regarding any adverse impacts of coal mining such as stream pollution.  As all hunters do, I do believe in clean air and streams.  

(3) On the third hand, from, living in MT, I do realize some of the best things we can do to provide habitat is to clear-cut and re-plant.  But in a controlled manner.

So W.Va guys, more education please on why this is good or bad.

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I’ve played golf on a reclaim mountaintop. It was beautiful. A great course, not cramed, short, uninteresting holes but a true championship layout. You could look out over 3 States. Peaks as far as you could see. Most untouched, some already flat, and the nearest a working strip job. Look one way and you feel like Daniel Boone seeing these mountains for the first time, awesome. Look the other way in no less awe at what has happened, happening. Gaping mountain, some of it just cleared, other parts in stages of reduction, laid open. You stand there thinking my Lord look what man has done! At the same time thinking look what Man can do! I thought about surface vs underground mining. Water is impacted either way. Somebody said something about “sustainable mining”, mining is not renewable, you go in, get the coal and get out. Takes less Labor to mine on top, you use bigger machinery. That means less jobs but I couldn’t help feeling that the operator of a D-8 I saw working on an overburden was glad he wasn’t underground. The golf course was built on just a fraction of the reclaimed side of the site. The rest was already covered in vegetation. Flats, rises, benches. Rocky but it was already rocky. Trees, shrubs, sericea, some grass, some gravelly open areas. I stood there wishing I could come back with my dogs because it was certainly great cover for the most part. Autunm olive ( a lot), grapes around the edges and lots of cover. No doubt there were grouse and deer and turkey, the rest of the mountain was hardwood forest!

So I stood there torn in so many ways. I could see the beauty of untouched peaks. I could see the unrivaled destruction of those peaks. I could also see there was beauty in what the destruction left behind. I’m sure this reclaim was a better one than most but it is what Can be done. I thought what a shame to forever alter these peaks and we should never let it continue forever but I also don’t want my energy bills to triple or worse putting my family in a bad way. I also know that the U.S. doesn’t use all this coal, large parts go to Africa and other continents around the world, why do we tear up this place for them. The feelings I had that day were not unlike the feelings of any hunter. Logging sites don’t look good but they lead to better hunting, more wildlife. We love the earth, nature, wildlife but we still take from it. We need coal for now just like we need a grouse in our vest sometimes, a place to live and places to “live”. Man has come to the mountains and he’s not leaving so we have to let him live, but be mindfull of what he is “leaving”.

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You ever notice how the anti nuke people always tip toe around the fact that France took the technology we developed tweaked it a little bit and have enjoyed 80% of their power from nuclear.

Without any problems

Absolutely correct. And France reprocesses spent fuel rods into new fuel rods as well. I certainly do NOT believe that the French are better nuclear engineers that we are.

And I have nothing against coal powered electricity as long as it does NOT pollute up the air, soil and water. And the technology to build or to refit older coal fired power plants into ones that are basically near pollution free exists as well. The coal industry has fought very successfully for years to avoid having to use it. Just as they have fought to avoid paying to treat acid runoff into everyone's trout streams.

 So, until the coal crowd cleans up its act, I say a pox on it.

Quailguy

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Personally, when my finances permit, I'll be building a house with a fuel cell power system and drive a vehicle powered by a fuel cell - and I'll produce my own hydrogen with a solar panel.  No utility bills and no gasoline bills each month - I wonder why the energy industry doesn't want us thinking this way?

Its your loving government that doesn't want you thinking this way.  If you and everyone produced their own fuel (energy) the loss in tax revenue would be intolerable.  Our government has a greater appetite for tax revenue than the people do for energy.

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