Jump to content

Favorite word(s) in the English language


Recommended Posts

Rex Hoppie

My work place people are very fond of "It is what it is" and then look as if hey said something profound.

Life's a bitch and then you die.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 85
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 12ette

    8

  • Rex Hoppie

    7

  • Ben Hong

    7

Dam, I'm afraid to talk now.I always thought I was using local slang.It appears that maybe too much time was spent in the parking lot during English class.Personally I enjoy running a sentence as long as I can without punktuation and love abbreviations.Gotta go now,Crosswords is on.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben, nu-cle-ar is clearly 3 syllables.  Merriam Webster may have been a semiliterate polititian.

Must be regional differences Rex, because I don't say "on a cle-ar day you can see forever". The dictionary on my desk is the Oxford Dictionary which agrees with me. Whatever, the point I was trying to make is that there is only one "u" in the word nuclear.

Link to post
Share on other sites
My work place people are very fond of "It is what it is" and then look as if hey said something profound.

I am with you on this... What the $##$ else could it be jackass.

Maybe, maybe not.   I hate this too.  This is the removal of every possibility.

Insipid.   Lacking in taste, (food); or lacking in qualities that interest or inspire.  

Callow.  Lacking in adult sophistication.  

"... and the evening wore on...."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of my favorites:

"Circumlocution": is an ambiguous or roundabout figure of speech. In its most basic form, circumlocution is using many words (such as "a tool used for cutting things such as paper and hair") to describe something simple ("scissors"). In this sense, the vast majority of definitions found in dictionaries are circumlocutory.

"Disambiguation":  is the process of identifying which sense of a word is used in any given sentence, when the word has a number of distinct senses.

"Debottlenecking": Increasing production capacity of existing facilities through the modification of existing equipment to remove throughput restrictions. Debottlenecking generally increases capacity for a fraction of the cost of building new facilities.  I've noticed that modern usage includes applying the term "debottlenecking" to administrative processes, as well.

--shinbone

Link to post
Share on other sites
The next time a waiter says, "No problem" I'm going to tear his eyeballs out.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Politically Correct, never have been, never will be.

I'll bet you are.  

People like to thing they are not.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The next time a waiter says, "No problem" I'm going to tear his eyeballs out.

Where did this start?  Bothers me too.  It makes me want to

CRINGE.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ben, nu-cle-ar is clearly 3 syllables.  Merriam Webster may have been a semiliterate polititian.

Must be regional differences Rex, because I don't say "on a cle-ar day you can see forever". The dictionary on my desk is the Oxford Dictionary which agrees with me. Whatever, the point I was trying to make is that there is only one "u" in the word nuclear.

Need to get you to TX.  Noo-kew-ler fishin' -- LBJ, have no idea what he used for bait.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...