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Gundogpa got me started thinking and thats always dangerous. My oldest graduated from University of Wisc. and is a part time bartender with no prospects. My daughter is a freshman at a local school. She worked hard and was rewarded with a fairly good scholarship. Still by the time she graduates she will have accumulated nearly 80 thousand dollars of debt. Her local prospects will amount to a 30 to 40 grand a year job, if she can find one. However if you don't get an education prospects are pretty dismal. I think the system is way out of whack.
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Agreed the cost of higher education is off the wall.  Its one of the reasons I'm glad I don't have kids.  There is a statistic out there somewhere about how much more money a person with a BA/BS will make over the course of their lifetimes versus someone with just a HS diploma.  Its impressive.

There are also so few jobs a person with just a diploma can get.  A friend of mine doesn't have his degree, he works in social services, he's a super smart guy, well read and so on.  But he can't get a promotion into the next slot because he doesn't have that piece of paper.  So he's stuck in a job that'll never make past 20 something grand.

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Never mind.  

The value of being educated is not measured financially.

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I was a champion underachiever in high school. My parents separation and subsequent divorce at 17 got me serious. The fact I received a bachelors degree; BFA in painting w/minor in Psyche is a miracle in itself. (Talk about a financially worthless major/minor.)  I put myself through college down to every penny and it took me a long time to pay off loans. So my bachelors degree never proved much worth it financially but its something I am proud of and something nobody can ever take away from me.

I always get the sense that people who boast about being self-educated are in fact rationalizing and down deep wish they had gotten a degree. Sorry if that pisses people off-its just a sense I get--nothing scientific about it.

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The value of being educated is not measured financially.

Exactly Erik yet how will we fare as a society if the average person cannot afford a higher education?

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calgaryrookie

My daughter is a freshman at a local school. She worked hard and was rewarded with a fairly good scholarship. Still by the time she graduates she will have accumulated nearly 80 thousand dollars of debt.

What does university cost down there? I'm not talking about an elite ivy league school. Just a decent quality State school or something. I have two sons going to a reasonably good university about 200 miles away from here (rated top 5 in Canada). I pick up their tuition, which is about $5,000 a year each. They work in the 4 month summer break (living at home while they do it) and earn enough to pay for rent, food, and beer for the school year. There are certainly student loans around but they shouldn't need them if they are frugal. They could also work PT during the school year but they don't really have to so they don't.

Can't imagine what school there must cost to get a kid $80,000 in debt for a bachelor's degree when they are getting a scholarship, working during the summer and perhaps even PT while in school..

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If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.  

Education is a key.  It will allow you more opportunities in any walk of life.  If you CHOSE to do nothing with your education, it is at least and educated choice.

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I pick up their tuition, which is about $5,000 a year each.

How many hours are they taking?  I just looked at my alma mater here in TX and it looks like $2500 for a 12 hour semester.  Add on campus housing and meals and it brings the total up to $6000 per semester.

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Our son is in his third year at a private college working on a Forestry degree.  Being our only one we felt we could go the more expensive route in order to allow him to attend the school of his choice.  However, we have an understanding that, once he graduates, he will need to pony up on some of the expense considering the interest rates on what will amount to a over $100K loan debt when he is finished.  His prospects will be whatever he makes of them, but will likely result in his taking a job in a distant state.

Having said that, his cosin, a young lady just one year out of a State University system with a degree in Communications, recently landed a job working for Cal Ripkin..... yea!   :oh:   So, it does occassionally fall into place.

mike

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Never mind.  

The value of being educated is not measured financially.

What was wrong with your original link?  I thought it had merit.  I think the earning potential of a degree versus the cost should be considered when choosing your potential college and career field.

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Intereting topic, and one very close to home for me.

Personally I highly value formal education.  But, I like learning for the sake of learning.  And a college degree has contributed greatly to my ability to earn an income.  In my life a college education has been worth far more than the dollars expended on its formal acquisition, and it is something that I continue to pursue.

But, I think college has become a false promise.  Our American desire to make all truths fit on a bumper sticker has  equated college as THE path to success.   That can be true, but it is not a truism.  Nor is the converse, you need college to be a success, a truism.

Phred

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Education, as others have said, is really non-quantitative.  Yes, those that have succeeding levels of education earn vastly more money, irrespective of the field.  

It would be fool-hardy at best to improve ones education simply for financial gain.  Similar things can be said about "...the earning potential of a degree versus the cost should be considered when choosing your potential college and career field."  Really?  If you are the best, or better than most, in your field, you will be comfortable financially, I guarantee it.  Yes, there are fields with disproportionate income-to-education levels, believe me, I'm living it.    

However, every tier of education has now become diluted, as the respective population of degree-earners rises.  Now-a-days, high-school diplomas mean little.  Very little.  Everyone has a BA/BS.  Even JD/MBA/MS's are a dime a dozen.  Not to say that the degrees are easier, far from it, just that there are more of them.  

But, of course there is the rub: with better education, there is a price.  I agree, vehemently, that any post-secondary education is expensive.  Very, very, expensive.  I wouldn't even know where to start to mitigate costs, nor even how to debate it, so I wont.  But you get what you pay for, like all things in life.

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