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prairierat

Has upland hunting been abandoned?

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topdog1961

There's a lot more work involved becoming an upland hunter (or waterfowl hunter) than there is becoming, say, a deer hunter or turkey hunter.

I read (OK scanned) this entire thread to see if someone already made this point.  And I think it too has much impact, like declining habitat.  If you look at changes in our society over the past decades, Americans are working harder and harder to stay economically afloat.  Now families must have two earners, household chores must be shared by both parents.  And many households have only one parent.  Bottom line it takes a lot of time, money and effort to train a bird dog.  Finding a place to hunt takes considerable travel for many of us.  No wonder the demographics are skewing to the elderly.  If you are busting your rear trying to raise a family, it is very difficult to train a dog and take a week off work for an upland hunting trip.  Trust me I know.  But I can grab a slug gun and hit the local woods for a few hours and have a good chance deer hunting, with little time or money invested.

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Larry Brown
I hear you, TD . . . and that's a good explanation for the guys who live a long ways from good upland hunting.  But what explains SD residents, with the best pheasant hunting in the nation in their backyards, not hunting pheasants as much as they used to?  Or Minnesotans, with better grouse numbers than they've had in a long time and all kinds of public land, not going grouse hunting?

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LouisMN

So I bought that book Jay Kumar wrote, not bad. I thought I was going to be able to light it up. It is a little spendy, but *shrug* spent a couple three hours reading it and was entertained... I do not know where I am going with this. Ummm, the guys who wrote the book are hunting in Maine this week according to their website. Other then that, well, I guess if you want a suggestion for a Christmas gift I would suggest the book.

Anyone else buy the book?

-Louis

P.S.

Benelli Outdoors did a show on Woodcock and Grouse last year it was great.

P.P.S

I am a sucker for books on birds so if anyone has any other good suggestions...

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topdog1961
I hear you, TD . . . and that's a good explanation for the guys who live a long ways from good upland hunting.  But what explains SD residents, with the best pheasant hunting in the nation in their backyards, not hunting pheasants as much as they used to?  Or Minnesotans, with better grouse numbers than they've had in a long time and all kinds of public land, not going grouse hunting?

Time limitations still impact the locals.  A lot of the older generation now enjoying bird hunting came of age in a era where you could reasonably hope to get a good job even without a college education, earning enough money working reasonable hours to support a family on one income.  One earner and one housekeeper in the family left more time to pursue pasttimes like bird hunting, and dog training.  Fast forward to 2010 where everything is, well....faster.  More work to maintain the same standard of living means less opportunity for passions that require a large investment of time.  The decline in bird hunting is a complex thing, this in only one contributor, IMO.

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Larry Brown
No question the economy is a factor.  That being said, for residents with very good bird hunting close to home . . . I grew up a dogless pheasant hunter, back when Iowa had bird densities rivaling SD, and we killed birds.  If you're somewhere like SD with all those pheasants, or MN at the peak of the grouse cycle, you don't need a dog to bring home game.  On the other hand, if you're going to go hunting without a dog, might as well shoot a deer.  More meat.

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erik meade
 More work to maintain the same standard of living...

Except that our "standard" of living has, on the whole, gotten much higher.  The size of the typical "middle class" house has tripled.  The number of cars in the family - doubled.  The entertainment budget - cable tv, internet, etc etc.    all way up.   We eat out and eat fancier foods when we are home,  etc.  

Of course not all of us,  but just the "average guy."

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Brad Eden

Hunting grouse and woodcock close to home or 'out your back door' isnt a costly adventure, or doesnt have to be. Certainly having to travel is more of a drain on a wallet.

I started w/no dog and a pump shotgun and added a $75 backyard bred Golden. The doubles, better bred dogs, nicer truck,....and....thats about it. I have an old springer and a whistle now and a handheld GPS, wear chaps over jeans and Carhart work shorts and some upland boots that leak and never fit right. You don't need all the expensive accoutrement and bells & whistles and expensive and exotic dogs to enjoy grouse and woodcock hunting and be successful. As we age and have more dispensible income we spend it on our passion, upland hunting.

So why aren't I running into other younger hunters in my home covers? Mainly because its hard to hunt and wingshoot grouse and woodcock.

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lee sykes
So why aren't I running into other younger hunters in my home covers? Mainly because its hard to hunt and wingshoot grouse and woodcock.

or because most folks have to work for a living.

Like I'm one to talk...

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martyg
You can buy most anything these days. Let us not sell our future in the uplands to commercialism. Our children will not prosper if some tv show/brandx does.

And upland will die.  It is like developing drugs to combat Third World diseases.   As a business model what company would invest when there is no return?

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trust me
And upland will die.  It is like developing drugs to combat Third World diseases.   As a business model what company would invest when there is no return?

You've lost me.  Where is this required commercial investment in upland hunting that has sustained us for this long? How did my father catch the uplands bug even in the era before television?

We need habitat and access.  Not dashing TV heroes and barrel stickers.

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lee sykes

You can buy most anything these days. Let us not sell our future in the uplands to commercialism. Our children will not prosper if some tv show/brandx does.

And upland will die.  It is like developing drugs to combat Third World diseases.   As a business model what company would invest when there is no return?

As Mr. Eden wrote in UJ Genesis: "We are for the most part, a solitary group"  

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Brad Eden
Some are still confusing the act of upland hunting with making some means of an income from the sport of upland hunting.

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Hunshatt

. I   wear chaps over Carhart work shorts, and some upland boots that leak , thats about it.

So why aren't I running into other younger hunters in my home covers?

Cause it's not a truck stop or rest area........and if you run into a youngster, I'm sure they be frightened by the sight.... I know I just threw up a little in my mouth, at the visual of you in shorts and chaps......

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Brad Eden
Work SHIRTS! The fact you seek out those typos disturbs me Tim.

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Hunshatt
hey..... couple of things.... I don't make this stuff up, just point it out.... second.... I've been doing a masters course on upland traditions with the smurf as the professor..... what do you expect...

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