Jump to content

Has upland hunting been abandoned?


Recommended Posts

I don't agree with a lot of things Kumar said but being ignored by mainstream outdoor media is not a good thing for upland hunting.

...

It will take multiple cogs in the wheel to re-energize the sport....

Downtown,

I guess my question is what makes you think that the upland hunting is in need of re-energization?

Think the main reason would be that if you don't have user/advocates then sooner or later resources go to the obviously larger/noisier segments, and/or legislation bypasses you, either pro or con, and you're left without your sport.

Mehhhh...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 155
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • erik meade

    12

  • Brad Eden

    12

  • Kansas Big Dog

    8

  • rprovines

    7

I don't really care very much whether our upland hunting tradition, or hunting in general, survives. In the general scheme of things it isn't really that important. Those of us who do it will continue to do it, and take our kids and grandkids, if they're interested. Unfortunately, more and more of them won't be, with or without a media drive to "re-energize" it.

I agree with those who say lack of land access is a huge threat and the way non-hunters perceive us has a real effect on that. Too much of the wrong kind of media attention can have a real impact in this area.

I do hang around with old guys Eric, but regardless, with a few exceptions, we're not replacing hunters that are dying or simply quitting. If you hang around with 30 and 40 year old upland hunters, good for you, but that gene pool is getting smaller and smaller, not that it really matters.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Downtown Bang!
I don't agree with a lot of things Kumar said but being ignored by mainstream outdoor media is not a good thing for upland hunting.

...

It will take multiple cogs in the wheel to re-energize the sport....

Downtown,

I guess my question is what makes you think that the upland hunting is in need of re-energization?

Like it or not in order to survive much beyond this generation Upland Hunting is going to have to compete. Compete for:

Available land resources.

Available conservation talent & conservation resources.

Favorable legislation & federal funding of conservation programs.

All of the above are scarce commodities and the ability to compete for them will largely depend on hunter numbers, participation in the cause and financial support.

I don't believe those of us currently enjoying what remains of the sport has to accept its "destiny".

Link to post
Share on other sites
We've covered this, ad-nauseam, on other U.J. threads, and it is almost hunting season, so I think I'll leave it alone, except to say, I see things quite a bit differently.
Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't agree with a lot of things Kumar said but being ignored by mainstream outdoor media is not a good thing for upland hunting.

...

It will take multiple cogs in the wheel to re-energize the sport....

Downtown,

I guess my question is what makes you think that the upland hunting is in need of re-energization?

Like it or not in order to survive much beyond this generation Upland Hunting is going to have to compete. Compete for:

Available land resources.

Available conservation talent & conservation resources.

Favorable legislation & federal funding of conservation programs.

All of the above are scarce commodities and the ability to compete for them will largely depend on hunter numbers, participation in the cause and financial support.

I don't believe those of us currently enjoying what remains of the sport has to accept its "destiny".

You also have to compete with consumer's mind-share and time-share.  With consumers doing more with less commitment to each activity upland just doesn't provide ROI.  

I have to disagree with the land-access issue, at least where I hunt.  However you still have to scout, knock on landowner's doors, foster those relationship, own and train dogs....   No easy task for the average family man of average means.

Production costs for quality upland TV show is also much higher than other hunting programs.  It is much more mobile, birds don't fly like you want them to, camera angles are not right, etc.   Higher production costs translate into higher budgets with more sponsor dollars needed, and for my dollar it does not represent a good return.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to disagree with the land-access issue, at least where I hunt.

Good qualifier, and needed. Because any hunting show isn't, and can't be, aimed at just where you hunt, it has to have a broad appeal. Evidently 'shock shot' shows have it, but damned if I know why. I love hunting, but those shows turn me off. Someone likes 'em, sponsors out the wazoo.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Roost em 1st
You can buy most anything these days. Let us not sell our future in the uplands to commercialism. Our children will not prosper if some tv show/brandx does.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Others have been more eloquent in responding to this topic than I - so I'll start by saying I agree with most of what has been said here so far, and I'm warmed by the tenor of the response.  

I remember what happened to fly fishing after "the movie."  It went from being a pasttime with a rich tradition and history,  and an escape from the pressures of civilization, to being an industry.  Having participated in both sides - I think the growth of the fly fishing industry was largely a net negative for fly fishing.  So much of the early industry was populated with hucksters and instant experts whose interest in fly fishing and the resource didn't extend beyond how much money they could make from it. It still is.  I would say that the streams and fish populations are not in better shape than they were 30 years ago, despite the increased number of "advocates."  And the fly fishing experience has diminished substantially, unless you like crowds.  While there is much more stuff to buy, much of it quite expensive, and some of it actually better than what we had 30 years ago - I don't think that benefit has been nearly worth the cost of what was sacrificed.  While I still love the sport, I find that I don't do it nearly as much as I used to.

I have no doubt that the "industrialization" of upland hunting would have the same negative effects.  In fact, it's pretty clear that this guy is the same kind of huckster I grew to despise in fly fishing.  I don't think this guy gives a toss about upland hunters, or the resource, or declining populations - I think he just sees it as another opportunity to make some quick bucks.  

It is not an accident that interest in turkey hunting and deer hunting has increased as a percentage of the total hunting population.  These are the species that are most readily availalble, whose numbers have actually been increasing.  They are species with a high tolerance for human disturbance, that can live in relatively close proximity to human habitations.  This means that, leasing aside, they are more easily available and accessable to a greater proportion of hunters.

On the other hand, declines in upland hunting populations have declined as bird populations and access have declined.  I suspect the figures will show that in states where birds are abundant and access for locals is relatively easy - upland hunting is doing fine.  The problem is that there are so few of those states.  Unlike Turkeys and Deer, game bird numbers are in serious decline.  

The argument that "media" could help reverse this by creating more advocates is enticing.  But there is no reason to believe it might be valid.  The kind of "media" this fellow advocates avoids conservation and "controversial" topics like crazy because they would offend the sponsors.  They would also offend a very vocal percentage of the viewers.  So they would be unlikely to create any advocates at all.  Certainly, the shows in the last thirty years haven't.  

The only way I see to increase the number of upland hunters is to increase bird populations and access.  These are difficult tasks and often they require restricting or eliminating the activities of some very powerful special interests.  Simply put, state game agencies generally won't fight for birds and habitat - and aren't in any rush to do so, because they know upland Hunters don't have the stones, or can't be bothered, to support them as they take on the special interests.  As long as that is the case - I don't think all the media in the world will make much of a difference.  Sad to say.

Link to post
Share on other sites
With due respect to Brad, his site is not keeping the tradition alive.  He's providing us with comaraderie and grabasserie, sure, but we each keep the tradition alive.  If Brad shut the site down, I'd be hunting regardless.  Each of us would, and we'd be taking friends and family with us.

Damn it, there goes my window of opportunity to post the UJ Subscription/Donation/Paypal link.

It is hard and apparently taboo to make a buck off Upland anything.

More regurgitation later as I ponder this question while stacking the cord of wood that just got dumped on my front lawn.

BTW There are REALLY no grouse in ME.

Link to post
Share on other sites
With due respect to Brad, his site is not keeping the tradition alive.  He's providing us with comaraderie and grabasserie, sure, but we each keep the tradition alive.  If Brad shut the site down, I'd be hunting regardless.  Each of us would, and we'd be taking friends and family with us.

I don't recognize a single media-hack name mentioned in the post above.  I don't watch TV.  I don't need media in any form to keep my upland tradition alive.  I can introduce friends and family to the sport and have done so.  They like it or they don't, just like anything else.  I find it very shallow and superficial to think that media coverage is required to keep upland hunting alive.  It survived without media for hundreds of years and will continue to do so.

What it won't survive is lack of hunting access.  The commercialization of deer and turkey hunting is a direct contributor to the loss of land access.  God help us all if we grow the sport to the point we are concerned with grouse leases.

Right on!

+2

This is pretty much dead on, IMO.

Link to post
Share on other sites
More regurgitation later as I ponder this question while stacking the cord of wood that just got dumped on my front lawn.

What?

What?

THat almost sounds as though you purchased that wood. Say it ain't so Brad.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I bought some wood last year.  It was so cheap that I started to wonder why I cut it myself.   $40 per mounded pick-up load.
Link to post
Share on other sites
I bought some wood last year.  It was so cheap that I started to wonder why I cut it myself.   $40 per mounded pick-up load.

Oh, just to be in the woods. Good exercise. Keeps ya busy. Great time killer.

Good honest work wood cutting is. I can understand why some people buy it instead.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...