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Shot a buck today...now I feel terrible


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Pheasants Forever
My 7 year old and High fived, several times in fact.  Its an emotional realease, no more no less, he ever let a " whoo hooo" only as a 7 year old can as he delighted over his trophy.  Ill admit I get excited as well, it takes a lot of work to subdue those emotions when shooting, or when bow hunting even longer.  

That is awesome!

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If you regret the kill, then why pull the trigger in the first place?

Animals don't have the ability to reason, they feel pain, but they can't process the situation like so many assume they would. We as humans tend think too much with our emotions, that's not always a bad thing, but when we're emotional... we tend to throw out our logic.

I remember reading an article some years ago about a coyote that was trying to cross a frozen pond.  The ice gave away and the coyote was soon submerged in the water trying to find a way out.  Well, there was a crowd there watching and someone called the fire department.  Attempts were made to rescue the animal, but given the nature of a coyote, the rescue could not be made with close in hand contact. The attempts failed, and the coyote died... granted a very miserable death. One of the on lookers was greatly disturbed by the way the fire department handled the situation as she felt they should have done more... she stated, that all the fire department had to do was get close enough to the coyote and grab it, and that the coyote would just ball up like a helpless dog, thankful to be rescued. The fire department knew better.

Anyway, I never feel pain, nor do I grieve over anything I kill. If I had, I probably wouldn't be a hunter. I do sympathize with the animal if I am not able to make a swift and quick kill, but tears do not shed.  I feel worse for the animals that are treated like a crop of grain. The free and wild animals know death, they're accepting of it.  Their bodies respond to it, they're lives are based around it.  They're well aware of the dangers they face... same cannot be said for the animal in a cage that is stripped of any chance at fight or flight.

I also high five, hug, and rejoice in our kills...

Hmmm...you're contradicting yourself here when you say animals can't process their situation, yet they are "aware of the dangers they face and are accepting of death" (paraphrased).  Not sure I agree completely with your assessment, but thanks for the feedback.

"Animals don't have the ability to reason, they feel pain, but they can't process the situation like so many assume they would."

 If an animal has no ability to reason...

"The free and wild animals know death, they're accepting of it.  Their bodies respond to it, they're lives are based around it.  They're well aware of the dangers they face..."

 It cannot Know/accept, or be aware. It merely reacts.

 There are people who enjoy killing. They get a rush, and they get off on it. I've listened to people talking about prairie dog shooting. Describing in a rush of excitement the exact damage and what it looks like when prairie dogs are hit with this bullet, and that caliber.

  Feeling JOY in killing is a little twisted if you ask me. I feel JOY when I get a hug from my 7 year old. That is exhilarating, and I want to high five the world. There is no way I could feel anything close to that over a kill. I feel relief, and extreme satisfaction in a good shot...because that relieves me from any further pain and suffering that I am visiting on the animal. So why am I a hunter? I'm simply wired that way. In the millions of years of evolution that has taken place on this planet, MY ancestors have survived.

 Plain and simple.

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How anyone can high five their buddy after shooting a deer is beyond me.

My 7 year old and High fived, several times in fact.  Its an emotional realease, no more no less, he ever let a " whoo hooo" only as a 7 year old can as he delighted over his trophy.  Ill admit I get excited as well, it takes a lot of work to subdue those emotions when shooting, or when bow hunting even longer.  Taking joy in killing game and in one s accomplishment is a good thing.

Ill admit as well I dont get as excited when we take birds, but deer, or a yote...man oh man...its a rush.

The "high five".

A little off topic but here's my take on it. I'm going out on a limb and say that this is a generational thing. I have lots of friends my age that "high five" but I would say on average that most people my age or older don't as a whole. The first reported "high five" was supposedly between Dusty Baker and Glen Burke in 1977 celebrating Bakers homerun. People like myself that played high school and collage sports long before 1977 didn't celebrate homeruns, touchdowns or winning games with anything other that a hand shake. Anything other that that would have resulted in a bean ball, fist or foot through the facemask of your helmet or just plain getting the crap kicked out of you on the playing field at the next game. Those of younger generations like my sons who have seen this on TV their whole life think nothing of the high five while lots of older people look at the "high five" as the same as giving the finger to your opponent or getting in their face (grill for you younger guys) and saying "up your's".

The "high five isn't wrong it's just different. Many find it offensive because of the time and way they were raised the same as lots of younger people finding it strange to shake hands because they don't know the real meaning behind the act.

Times and traditions change unlike people that get set in their ways.

Wishing all a very Merry Christmas!

Virgil

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Kansas Big Dog
I hunt, the goal is to kill game to consume.  I look at it as though this is a natural thing to do, we as humans have been killing animals to eat for a long time.  Our culture has removed the killing part from the eating part.  Most people will never kill anything that they will eat, yet most eat meat.  Do you feel as much remorse when you throw down a Big Mac as when you shoot a deer.  Something was killed in both circumstances, one was just done out of our sight.  I grew up in very humble circumstances and from a very young age put food on the table from hunting and fishing.  Was I greatful, yes, very much so.  Do I respect wildlife, yes very much so, I do not think I could kill anything that I do not consume.  Even though my socio-economic position has greatly improved since I was growing up, I still hunt deer just for meat; we like deer.  For me, during deer season, the goal is to put deer in the freezer.  Quick clean kills make the job just that much easier.
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Brian Edwards
I have shot several deer over the years, I can remember being 17 and killing the first one. That was total elation and joy, it took four seasons before I finally killed one.  Some other kills there was definitly different emotions.  I shot a doe once with a bow and she moaned awfully before she died, it was terrible.  I was 41 when I  shot my first and only elk.  Shot the bull at about 80 yards with a quartering to shoulder shot.  The bullet broke the shoulder and exited out the opposite side, he ran maybe 20 yards and piled up.  Again very exciting, but when I walked up on him he was still breathing and trying to get up, even though the bullet I later found, had creased the side of his heart.  I couldn't help but feel sad for this noble animal trying to get up and live.  I quickly put another round in him even though he was quickly dying.  Having said all that, whether animals know they are dying or not doesn't matter, we know it.  Nothing wrong with being a little sad at taking a great animal, also nothing wrong with being excited, its called living and at the end of it all, aren't your glad you are a hunter.  Can I get an Amen?
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If you regret the kill, then why pull the trigger in the first place?

Animals don't have the ability to reason, they feel pain, but they can't process the situation like so many assume they would. We as humans tend think too much with our emotions, that's not always a bad thing, but when we're emotional... we tend to throw out our logic.

I remember reading an article some years ago about a coyote that was trying to cross a frozen pond.  The ice gave away and the coyote was soon submerged in the water trying to find a way out.  Well, there was a crowd there watching and someone called the fire department.  Attempts were made to rescue the animal, but given the nature of a coyote, the rescue could not be made with close in hand contact. The attempts failed, and the coyote died... granted a very miserable death. One of the on lookers was greatly disturbed by the way the fire department handled the situation as she felt they should have done more... she stated, that all the fire department had to do was get close enough to the coyote and grab it, and that the coyote would just ball up like a helpless dog, thankful to be rescued. The fire department knew better.

Anyway, I never feel pain, nor do I grieve over anything I kill. If I had, I probably wouldn't be a hunter. I do sympathize with the animal if I am not able to make a swift and quick kill, but tears do not shed.  I feel worse for the animals that are treated like a crop of grain. The free and wild animals know death, they're accepting of it.  Their bodies respond to it, they're lives are based around it.  They're well aware of the dangers they face... same cannot be said for the animal in a cage that is stripped of any chance at fight or flight.

I also high five, hug, and rejoice in our kills...

Hmmm...you're contradicting yourself here when you say animals can't process their situation, yet they are "aware of the dangers they face and are accepting of death" (paraphrased).  Not sure I agree completely with your assessment, but thanks for the feedback.

"Animals don't have the ability to reason, they feel pain, but they can't process the situation like so many assume they would."

 If an animal has no ability to reason...

"The free and wild animals know death, they're accepting of it.  Their bodies respond to it, they're lives are based around it.  They're well aware of the dangers they face..."

 It cannot Know/accept, or be aware. It merely reacts.

 There are people who enjoy killing. They get a rush, and they get off on it. I've listened to people talking about prairie dog shooting. Describing in a rush of excitement the exact damage and what it looks like when prairie dogs are hit with this bullet, and that caliber.

  Feeling JOY in killing is a little twisted if you ask me. I feel JOY when I get a hug from my 7 year old. That is exhilarating, and I want to high five the world. There is no way I could feel anything close to that over a kill. I feel relief, and extreme satisfaction in a good shot...because that relieves me from any further pain and suffering that I am visiting on the animal. So why am I a hunter? I'm simply wired that way. In the millions of years of evolution that has taken place on this planet, MY ancestors have survived.

 Plain and simple.

Scotsman, that's a great post.  I feel much like you do. Merry Christmas.

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I didn't read all the posts, but I will agree with those that said you are feeling sadness out of respect for the animal.

A true hunter has respect for the game he/she takes. A killer does not.

Well done, nice buck!

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