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The taste of a ruffed grouse...


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  • rprovines

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I really have no idea..... if they lost or not..... to busy working dogs yesterday. I should have been hunting, but the little smurf was worried about getting lost in a snow drift.....

and what ya got we can auction off?

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to busy working dogs yesterday.

Tim, you pay the trainer to "work" your dogs. What you did yesterday was called chasing after your dogs.  There is a difference. Just saying.

Ted

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Good ole Tedder, always keepin' you honest.

Lessee, I could auction some of this first-batch soprasetta. That way if it kills someone Brad takes the heat. Botulism, what a way to go. I got some coppa curin', same deal as that sausage.

I got a blue cheese agin', but eff you, it ain't leavin' the house. Ain't that wild about lettin' go of any of the goudas or cheddars, some of them are finally getting some age on them.

I'm learnin' to bake a beautiful and tasty loaf of bread, might be worth something, artisan loaves sell well, you should know, out there in yuppie land.

Just peddle one of them guns you can't hit with. Don't matter which one. Won't bring much with the twists and turns and crooks and bends you've had put in the stocks, but whoever gets it can re-stock it with a straight piece of hickory. Make a nice pheasant killer out of it.

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Pecan and Panco  or  drizzled with a shallot,scallion,mushroon and white wine sauce

100_1054.jpg

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to busy working dogs yesterday.

Tim, you pay the trainer to "work" your dogs. What you did yesterday was called chasing after your dogs.  There is a difference. Just saying.

Ted

and theres the kettle calling the pot black...... well I guess the big difference is your dogs dont go out far enough that you have to chase them.......... but that hereretta dog does have a reputation as a good backer........ gee chubby, who told you that?...just askin.......

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Henry Rackliff

Smoked these birds per PC's instruction and they were fantastic.  That one is staying on the agenda for sure.

IMG_2160.jpg

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PartridgeCartridge
Smoked these birds per PC's instruction and they were fantastic.  That one is staying on the agenda for sure.

IMG_2160.jpg

And those look perfectly done. Nice job.

Yummy?

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Smoked these birds per PC's instruction and they were fantastic.  That one is staying on the agenda for sure.

IMG_2160.jpg

And those look perfectly done. Nice job.

Yummy?

Alright, wait a second.  I need this recipe.  I have a Weber Smokey Mountain smoker, and make some of the most succulent smoked ribs and PP you ever had, all over charcoal and hand hewn applewood...please, where is this recipe?  Those pheasants?  Look MM good.  Have NOT done birds yet.  Did a haunch of venison once, was ho hum...

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PartridgeCartridge

Smoked these birds per PC's instruction and they were fantastic.  That one is staying on the agenda for sure.

IMG_2160.jpg

And those look perfectly done. Nice job.

Yummy?

Alright, wait a second.  I need this recipe.  I have a Weber Smokey Mountain smoker, and make some of the most succulent smoked ribs and PP you ever had, all over charcoal and hand hewn applewood...please, where is this recipe?  Those pheasants?  Look MM good.  Have NOT done birds yet.  Did a haunch of venison once, was ho hum...

Since many of us have frozen birds in the freezer right now, I'll give you my insights on smoking game birds perfectly.

Okeydokey, here we go.

There are three critical areas to pay attention to:

1. Prep

2. "Resting"

3. The actual smoking process.

The prep is the brine. Try to use the minimum salt/sugar mixture as a strong brine will mask the flavor of the bird and produce an overly salty and smokey end product. Do not puncture the bird/breasts to let the brine enter the meat unnaturally. Do not brine for more than 4 hours and less is better. keep the brine simple and forget the herbs and crap.

"Resting" is a critical step in smoking and if you skip this process you will NOT get the best results. Basically, this step involves racking the birds/breasts in a cool area so that they can drip completely dry and form a pectination on the outside. This outer cured layer is critical to producing moist, juicy flesh in the finished product. Rack your birds on a grate or and old broiler rack in the fridge for at least 8 hours.

Smoking: Many people really screw this step up by commiting three basic sins.

1.Too much heat

2.Too much moisture

3. Too much smoking time

It is the combination of the brine, the pectination and the smoke that cures the meat. Not heat. Heat is your enemy if you want really tender, succulent, pink meat. Keep in mind that just because the meat is pink, it is still fully cooked, it's just that the pink color is a result of the meat retaining all of its natural juices and FLAVOR. If your birds come out white, you used too much heat.

Moisture levels in the smoker is also a no no if the levels are too high. Too much internal moisture will start to draw too much heat into the flesh and the bird will essentially start to "poach". This will also produce a white flesh in the end, which you are trying to avoid.

Too much smoking time will produce a dry bird and a tough flesh.

Keep an eye on the exterior color of the bird. When you start to see a light carmel color you are approaching the end of the process. Keep in mind that even if you turn the smoker off at this point, the chemical process of curing will still be active for an hour or so. It is very similar to taking a steak off the grill at the right time, knowing it will still cook on the plate for a few minutes.

Smoking birds is a learning process and you will make mistakes in the beginning. Then again, you may do it perfectly the first time, especially if you heed the above advice.

Rackliff paid attention and his turned out perfectly the first time.

Good luck and feel free to send my any samples for independent taste testing.

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So, PC, it seems the pectination (did you make that word up??) and herb crap (or lack thereof) are the keys to success.  Apple wood OK?  It will have to be.  Also, temp dude?  I can hold my smoker at an even 225F for 12-16 hours or lower if needed and add a water pan for a little moisture.  Sounds like it's trial and error so I might have to go shoot a mess of preserve P'easants to work with.  Do you check internal temperature?  

Lord knows I can't hit grouse so won't be smoking them...but then again you're going to solve that problem too, right??

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PC--add that to the Upland Recipes forum when you have a chance. Thanks.
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Henry Rackliff
I guess I definitely brined them for too long but they were friggin' incredible.  I gave a slice to Dave Furman at the dinner party and his eyes got very large.  He asked if I could smoke the 10 grouse he has in his freezer.  My reply was certainly.  I just can't guarantee that he would get all 10 back.
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bosco mctavitch
I guess I definitely brined them for too long but they were friggin' incredible.  I gave a slice to Dave Furman at the dinner party and his eyes got very large.  He asked if I could smoke the 10 grouse he has in his freezer.  My reply was certainly.  I just can't guarantee that he would get all 10 back.

Not quite 10, but maybe 4 or 5...the rest didn't last long!

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