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Alan Briere

Venison neck roast

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Alan Briere

My deer processor gave us a couple of venison neck roasts from this season's buck. I am used to seeing neck meat go to stuff like burger and stew meat. Getting neck roasts was a surprise. Any specific different considerations for how to cook such a cut?

Alan

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Brad Eden

This is a winner Alan-simple too. The magazine I write that sporting column for did an article on me/wild game cooking 'believe it or not' and the editor and publisher/photographer came over to house and I cooked this neck roast, a wild turkey and my grouse with apples and grape jelly dish:

Garden of Eden Venison Pot Roast

Serves 4-6

3-5 lb venison roast

4 medium potatoes

3 medium onions

4 large carrots

4 celery sticks

1 package of fresh mushrooms

5 garlic cloves

10 oz. can mushroom soup

1 Tbls. Worcestershire Sauce

1 cup red wine

Salt and pepper

Season roast on all sides with salt and pepper and place in a large roasting pan. Chop up potatoes (skin on), onions, carrots, celery, mushrooms and garlic into chunks. Scatter vegetables around and on top of roast. Mix soup concentrate with 3/4+- can of water and pour over roast along with red wine. Add Worcestershire sauce. Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 2-3 hours, turn down heat to 300 degrees and bake an additional 2 hours or so. Baste with liquids in pan several times while cooking. The low heat and long cooking time is the key to a tender venison pot roast.

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Alan Briere

Thanks Brad.

Alan

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VizslavsBird

Brads recipe sounds great.

One with a little southwest flare:

4-5 pounds venison roast

2 cups dried pinto beans (guess you could use the dried bean of your choice if you dont like pintos)

1 can of Rotel tomatoes (diced with chiles)

Diced large onion

Couple of bay leaves

S&P to taste.

Place all ingredients in slow cooker along with enough water to cook the beans (sorry, no measurement) before you head to work, enjoy the meal when you get home that night.

Normally we eat with a salad and tortillas.

FWIW-I have very mixed emotions on whether CWD poses much danger for humans or if it is a slight possibility that was blown out of proportion by MSM.  But if you are in an area with lots of CWD, you might consider the risk you are willing to assume.  Although I personally think the risk is small, I do avoid brains and spinal columns for cervids as those are believed to be the areas with the greatest risk of exposure.  Personally, I would remove as much meat as possible from the neck bones without cutting the vertebra apart, toss out the bones and cook the meat, which is exactly what I did before CWD was an issue.

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M V McDonald

Alan, you are in for a real treat.  In our family, the neck roast is considered the finest of all the venison roasts and the first thing we prepare - slow cooked with lots of spuds and carrots.  Rendering the neck meat to stew and burger is simply criminal.  Like VB, I debone the neck roast - and all my vension for that matter.  The bone saw never touches any deer I butcher.  Bone dust and marrow are just more mess to deal with on the meat - hair is bad enough.  Organ meats like liver and heart stay in the wood with the rest of the guts - where they belong, IMHO!

Sorry if I got carried away.

Mike

EDIT:  In hind sight this sounds a bit harsh.  Actually I will save the liver and heart for friends if the want it, but I don't care for it myself.

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