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Marcellus Shale

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Rick T
Don,  before the Miss. River was controled by levees mainly after the 1927 flood, the river in spring overflowed its banks.  This water flowed through bayous and creeks into the low fresh water marshes along the coast, growing the marshes with sediment and nutrients.  That was similar to what is currently happening with the opening of the Morganza floodway in the Atchafalaya basin but on a much, much larger scale.  Since the levee system that is currently in place, sediment flows down the Miss River and basically falls off the shelf in the gulf. This has had the effect of reducing (eleminating) nutrients, sediments and fresh water entering the coastal marshes that it previously built and restored.  I grew up down there, hunted and fished in the marsh.  I have seen over the course of my lifetime the loss of coastal marsh in Louisiana because of the levee system and canals dredged for oil and gas drilling, intracoastal waterway and the MRGO.

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DonS

Don,  before the Miss. River was controled by levees mainly after the 1927 flood, the river in spring overflowed its banks.

Good info.  Sounds like the main problem is the channelization dating back to 1927 as opposed to more recent events.

I have no financial stake in natural gas but I do have a large stake in the future of our country, and it seems to me that natural gas is extremely clean, close and plentiful - and desparately needed right now.  It would be a shame if we let a few self righteous grand stander pseudo science "experts" screw that up for us.

R,

Don

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DonS

http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs....-spring

Looks like it's not working out particularly well for the members of the Sykesville Hunting Club in PA . . .

Chip,

Oregon, you say?

Interesting write up, a wee bit short on vital details.

What is the water polluted with, exactly, and how long lasting will the effects be?  If you had chili for dinner, your bathwater is at greater risk, I suspect.

How far is Sykesville from TMI? Maybe we should have GE put "Fukishima 7" there and spare our friends a temporary spate of methane bubbles!

R,

Don

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wcpeabody

What is the water polluted with, exactly, and how long lasting will the effects be?  If you had chili for dinner, your bathwater is at greater risk, I suspect.

Don

My education is in hydrology and I grew up working in the oil fields in PA.

IMHO - Even if the well(s) causing the issue were plugged tomorrow, due to the slow rate in movement-exchange of water in aquifers, a polluted aquifer is polluted for multiple human lifetimes and extremely hard to clean up.

Bill

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Cold Iron

There is no doubt that they have caused water contamination of the 16 family wells in Bradford County, which is why they were fined. What if it happened on the Schrader in Bradford where there are few houses and decent population of trout? Or Pine or Slate Run in Tioga? There are quite a few to pick from and they are drilling near them all. They have already polluted trout streams and paid settlements in Clearfield County for Alex Branch and Little Laurel Run.

What makes me nervous about the situation is that Pa. has more damage from coal mining than any other state with miles of dead streams. They are still working on abandoned mine drainage (AMD) and likely will for a long time. While I’ve shot grouse on some of the mine reclamation areas like Barclay in Bradford it reminds me more of Stephen King Pet Cemetery there. Wonder if there really were any lessons learned.

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DonS
My education is in hydrology and I grew up working in the oil fields in PA.

IMHO - Even if the well(s) causing the issue were plugged tomorrow, due to the slow rate in movement-exchange of water in aquifers, a polluted aquifer is polluted for multiple human lifetimes and extremely hard to clean up.

Bill

That's odd.  The article didn't mention the aquifer - just the bubbles at ground level.  

What's missing here is facts.

R,

Don

P.S. Not questioning your credentials, just validating them. How long have you been employed as a hyrdrologist, and in what capacity?

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DonS
What makes me nervous about the situation is that Pa. has more damage from coal mining than any other state with miles of dead streams.

Your concern for Pennsylvanians, as a Minnesotan, is quite touching and the attempt to  equate the environmental impact of the much cleaner natural gas with coal is ingenious, kind of.  I would hope that our friends in Pennsylvania would be able to sort it all out without your help and mine, though!

R,

Don

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PWZ
Congrats on the perfect 10 for condescension.

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DonS
Congrats on the perfect 10 for condescension.

Backatcha, for sarcasm!

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PWZ
it wasn't sarcasm, I'm actually impressed. You might as well have eaten the whole wheel of cheese.

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DonS

it wasn't sarcasm, I'm actually impressed.

Well thank you, then - an even greater accomplishment when you consider that I don't even have a degree in that field.

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Irish Joe

DonS,

You stated in another post," It would be a shame if we let a few self righteous grandstander pseudo science "experts" screw up that up for us".

You are all for natural gas drilling, I understand that. But, you come across that your opinion is the only one that matters.

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Cold Iron
What makes me nervous about the situation is that Pa. has more damage from coal mining than any other state with miles of dead streams.

Your concern for Pennsylvanians, as a Minnesotan, is quite touching and the attempt to  equate the environmental impact of the much cleaner natural gas with coal is ingenious, kind of.  I would hope that our friends in Pennsylvania would be able to sort it all out without your help and mine, though!

R,

Don

Not a stretch of the imagination at all if you think about it. As Scratch said (tongue in check) it is only water.

As for me on the West rim of the canyon in Tioga County is part of an old settlement farm house with the original wood stove and kitchen counter top. That was my Great Great Grandmothers kitchen, Grandma Hat- her maiden name was Hatfield. The barn was down by the turkey path which my grandparents hiked the mile up and back down every day on their honeymoon camping on Pine to get milk during the depression. Last week I stopped to take a picture of the one room school house my mother went to. Figure it will not be there much longer. I grew up there fishing from Kettle to the Schrader and down to the Sock. I usually return most every year to attend funerals, see friends and family, hunt, fish and shoot clays. And take my son when he can. It is called heritage. As I said I don’t pay taxes or own land in Pa. But I do have a vested interest.

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DonS
DonS,

You stated in another post," It would be a shame if we let a few self righteous grandstander pseudo science "experts" screw up that up for us".

You are all for natural gas drilling, I understand that. But, you come across that your opinion is the only one that matters.

Sorry if I come across that way to you.  I claim no specialized credentials in the field - just thinking out loud I guess.

I'm not necessarily "all for natural gas drilling" though - if there is a better way to feed our country with the fuel we need to survive and thrive economically. That's the part of the equation that seems to get left out, more often than not.

R,

Don

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