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Right now, I'm about a third of the way through Killing Rommel by Steven Pressfield, which I think will complete my Pressfield reading exclusing The Legend of Bagger Vance, which really doesn't interest me.  But so far, Killing Rommel has been great.  I am a big Pressfield fan, and this hasn't been a disappointment at all.  Before that, I finished some Jules Verne stuff.  

Some good ideas here, Thomas Mcguane has been on my list for a while.  And For a Handful of Feathers is on my all time great list too.

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I enjoyed "1776" as well, I couldn't put it down.  I just finished "Ireland" by Frank Delaney, and am currently reading "Theodore Roosevelt in the Badlands" by Roger L. Di Silvestro.  Both are good reads.

Wes

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Any fantasy r.a. Salvatore fans might like the book Fallen by C.A. Duryea.  Its only available for e-readers, I enjoyed it.
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Since this thread started, I've re-read Rand's "Atlas Shrugged" and Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird."  The books have a lot in common, in that they are both on my shelf and have lots of letters and words and stuff and are both printed on paper.

Now that I've learned how to read Ayn Rand, I think I'll tackle "Fountainhead."  The trick is to read until a character launches into a 5 page soliloquy, and then you need to quickly scan the preachy diatribe, then start paying attention again when the story picks back up.  That way you can finish a really good novel before you die of old age.

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Edward Abbey's "Desert Solitaire"

Reviewed-----When Desert Solitaire was first published in 1968, it became the focus of a nationwide cult. Rude and sensitive. Thought-provoking and mystical. Angry and loving. Both Abbey and this book are all of these and more. Here, the legendary author of The Monkey Wrench Gang, Abbey's Road and many other critically acclaimed books vividly captures the essence of his life during three seasons as a park ranger in southeastern Utah. This is a rare view of a quest to experience nature in its purest form -- the silence, the struggle, the overwhelming beauty. But this is also the gripping, anguished cry of a man of character who challenges the growing exploitation of the wilderness by oil and mining interests, as well as by the tourist industry.

Abbey's observations and challenges remain as relevant now as the day he wrote them. Today, Desert Solitaire asks if any of our incalculable natural treasures can be saved before the bulldozers strike again.

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Highly recommend Unbroken and In The Garden of Beasts.

The latest Tom Clancy novel is not worth buying...get it through the library.

I'm about to begin re-reading A Town Like Alice by Neville Shute.

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LostintheOzone

Blood and Thunder by Hampton Sides. Pretty good read about Kit Carson and the history of the west. That one gave me a whole new perspective on the southwest, even though I lived there for 20 years.

Jim

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If you're into WWII history, try "Wild Bill Donovan", the story of the WWI medal of honor winner who created and led the OSS (forerunner of CIA) in WWII.  By Douglas Waller.  I'd read one earlier biography of Donovan, but this one contains a lot of recently declassified material.  Donovan had nearly as many bureaucratic enemies to fight as he did Nazis and Japs.

But...if you are interested in who REALLY "created" Wild Bill Donovan and guided him in spycraft and other nefarious and clandestine arts, then you would have to read the books "The Quiet Canadian", "Room 3603" and "A Man Called intrepid". These largely factual accounts make Ian Fleming's work look like dime novels.

Bill Stevenson is a true Canadian hero...WW1 air combat ace (12 kills), inventor (wireless transmission of photos), billionaire, confidant and adviser to Churchill and FDR, named "Wild Bill" Donovan to FDR as the man he would prefer to head up the OSS...He operated Camp X in Whitby Ont. where all promising allied spies went to get polished up, including those agents of the new OSS (later CIA). From 1940 till the end of the war, he ran every "spy agency" on the allied side out of Room 3603 in the Rockefeller Center. I mean "every" agency...

There are streets, monuments, schools and other things and institutions named after him in Canada.

Not America-centric, but any one of the three books I cited is worthy of a read by serious readers who are interested in knowing how things developed the way they did.

I picked up Room 3603 (95 cent paperback, pub. 1970)a few days ago when Bill Stevenson's name was mentioned in another context. I am such a pack rat when it comes to books.

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Mike Connally

I'm near the end of reading Guy de la Valdene's book "The Fragrance of Grass".  Like his other books he brings a different perspective to the sport.  He is truly a modern philosopher, but in this case he dwells quite a bit on the dark side of the sport.  I think he believes that most hunters are unethical and quite a bit below his standards.  A little bit of a name dropper, he has lived a privliged life and has opportunities to hunt that most people can only dream about.  

Still, the book is interesting.  It details his early hunting experiences in France , on great and small estates, and our south and west.

He's a great writer but definately lives on a different plane from you and I.  (Except maybe Greybeard)

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Now that I've learned how to read Ayn Rand, I think I'll tackle "Fountainhead."  The trick is to read until a character launches into a 5 page soliloquy, and then you need to quickly scan the preachy diatribe, then start paying attention again when the story picks back up.  That way you can finish a really good novel before you die of old age.

Now that I know the trick maybe I'll go back and finish "Atlas Shrugged", after 3/4's of the book I just couldn't stand being beaten over the head any more.

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Hampton Sides' "Ghost Soldiers." An interesting account of the rescue, of mainly American POW's at Carabanatuan, the main Jap POW camp in the Philipines, after their WW2 Philipine invasion.  

Unbelievable physical and mental hardship endured by our  captured WW2 Vets.

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"Matterhorn" by Karl Marlantes is a gritty and gripping novel about US Marines in Vietnam.......hard to put down!
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foureyedgeek
I've been reading a bit of James Lee Burke this summer.  I never really got into the crime fiction side of things but the way that he spins the tales makes it much more than a whodunnit.
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