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At Dieppe, the Canadians played a tragic role before D-Day.

Indeed.  If memory serves, the Canadians suffered badly at Slapton Sands as well, but that was hidden until 40+ years later.

Without looking it up in Wiki, wasn't Slapton Sands an American tragedy?

Dieppe was the epitome of negligence, arrogance, and and pure callousness by the so-called leaders of the allied cause: Eisenhower, Mountbatten on down. In one day 3800 of 6000 (5000 Canadians) men in the attacking force were killed, injured or captured , please compare these figures with those of DDay. I could go on for pages, suffice to say that some of us remember and I hope the memory will never fade.

Some will say that the Canadian sacrifice was justified because the raid taught some valuable lessons for DDay. I don't know.

That's an awfully hard and bloody way to learn lessons.  I've stood on that beach, with head bowed.  Dieppe, Market Garden . . . lots of good men died when generals came up with bad ideas.

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I just looked it up, and yes, Slapton Sands was an American tragedy.  I thought the Canucks lost a lot of men, but the casualties were all American.  946 of them.

The Allies were rehearsing full-scale for the Normandy beach invasions and some German subs got in among the landing craft.  Picked off a number of vessels fully loaded with soldiers.  Eisenhower had to put the lid on it so as not to tip the world off about the European invasion about to take place.

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German E-boats (not subs), more or less like our PT's, did the damage.  There were also quite a few friendly fire casualties.  A real cock-up, as the Brits might say.  The friendly fire part reminded me of the US Navy shooting down transports carrying paratroopers during the invasion of Sicily.

Seems so much worse when your own bad plans, or your own fire, result in friendly casualties.  Canadians in Afghanistan killed by US aircraft, and some of our own troops by our own planes during the invasion of Iraq.

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anyone read anything by Alan Savory a english man only

wrote three books to my knowledge, his descriptive

writing on fishing/hunting scenes, superb!

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Cooter Brown

Been reading mostly fiction for a while--recently Faulkner's "Sanctuary", I found it unlike his other stuff in structure and style--not as much stream of consciousness stuff which sort of drives me crazy.

Before that was T.C. Boyles' "The Road to Wellville" which was pretty funny.

And "Pride and Prejudice", which I surprised myself by enjoying a lot.

Anyway since I'd been reading so much fiction when I saw "Seabiscuit" by Laura Hillenbrand at the thrift store I picked it up.  Just finished and enjoyed it thoroughly.

I want to get her latest, "Unbroken", about a WWII flyer who was captured by the Japanese.

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p><p>

I read this lately and it is recommended. I love the new physics that is being researched and wonder why it is not a household topic. The book agrues that the math points to multiple universes not just the one we are in. What could be more ground shaking than that?

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anyone read anything by Alan Savory a english man only

wrote three books to my knowledge, his descriptive

writing on fishing/hunting scenes, superb!

A good tip. I can't remember if I read him but I read other English waterfowling authors that were very good. Try Denys Watkins-Pitchford - better known as BB.

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Am finishing The Big Short by Michael Lewis (author Blind Side). Lewis did a remarkable job explaining the technical side of the mortgage backed securities scandals.  For those interested in studying a historical analogy to the current fiscal and monetary FUBAR, read The Forgotten Man by Amity Shales written before the last presidential election cycle.
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I am not a pointy dog type but I did enjoy "Jenny Willow" by Mike Gaddis.  Found it quite by accident while taking the munchkins to the library.  

I love these threads.  I keep a list in my planner for when I take the kids to the library.  I've found some gems thanks to these threads.

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Recently read George Bird Evans' An Affair with Grouse. Some passages were excellent. Some were hard to read. I don't know if any of his other books are as "complete" as The Upland Shooting Life, but I still enjoyed.

Also trying to get through the New Testament. Paul was the man.

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I'm reading Fire Season - Philip Connors right now, it's interesting, about being a wilderness fire lookout, his thoughts bounce around in an interesting fashion.

just finished reading this and have to agree it was a good read.  Thanks for the recommendation, I burned through it on a few weeks worth of train rides to and from work.

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Another one reading "Empire of the summer moon".  In some ways I envy the freedom those commanche warriors had.
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