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Insanelupus, lets talk elk.


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insanelupus

You fellers and your sticks and strings!!   :D   Actually I do enjoy shooting a bow, had one as a kid, just a 40 pound long bow, but I loved target shooting with it.  A friend shoots his longbow instinctively (a 55-60 pound custom) and I shot it some too.  I'd like to pick up a compound bow one of these days, if I find a decent one for a good price that fits me, and do some target practice with it.  But I have no desire to hunt with one at this time.  It would cut into my dog/bird time too much.   I do tease my buddies though (all in good fun) that the Indians did eventually give up their sticks and strings when powder and ball came along!!  

I do have to admire those of you that do archery hunt though, it is a challenge.  I also enjoy studing the methods of archery hunters as I do use them for rifle season and handgun hunting and thoroughly enjoy getting close when I can.  (My spring bear was a laser ranged 28.5 yards when I shot him.  The bear before him that I snuck up on was about 35-40, but I miffed that one up.)  But when the chips are down, I really like having the luxury of reaching out to a hundred  yards or so if I need to.

GS,

With 10 minutes till light though, how far away do you plan to be from the elk when you start trying to work them?  Just wondering if you are fishing with the call or if you have an idea already where they are.  If you are fishing, and they are a ways away, do you still try to work them, or do you stay silent and get closer then work them?

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gonehuntin
Remember that GS is talking about archery elk. During the later gun seasons, end of Oct. thru Nov., you'll hear precious little bugling. Then it's a game of watching the parks, intercepting them on the way from meadows to bedding areas, or covering escape routes. Entirely different from September Elk. I don't personally like riffle hunting nearly as well because the mountains look like a pumpkin patch, the elk aren't bugling or coming in to calls, and the excitement is gone. Dang cold too. If you KNOW which pocket they're bedded in, then still hunting deadly. No calling while you're trying to shoot one in it's bed or they'll have you pinpointed. Shut up, stay downwind, go so slow it bores you to death. Cow call to stop them or make them stand up. I always carry a diaphram in my mouth.
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gselkhunter

The one thing about rifle season is the elk are on their feet longer than in Aug/Sept. Cold temps and brown grass have them feeding longer, it gives you a little more time to work.

Gselkhunter

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I'd like to pick up a compound bow one of these days, if I find a decent one for a good price that fits me, and do some target practice with it.  But I have no desire to hunt with one at this time.  It would cut into my dog/bird time too much.

to me thats the beauty of bow hunting for them you can do it early in Sept. when its too hot to bird hunt

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gselkhunter
GS,

With 10 minutes till light though, how far away do you plan to be from the elk when you start trying to work them?  Just wondering if you are fishing with the call or if you have an idea already where they are.  If you are fishing, and they are a ways away, do you still try to work them, or do you stay silent and get closer then work them?

I am not really fishing, because I know where they should be, just making sure they are there. I have had bulls in with me in less than 3 mins and can't shoot them yet. That is another type of game keeping them there until you can shoot them, I have done that too. But most of the time the first bull in isn't one you want to shoot. They are the spike to 5X5 type, little boys. And the bigger boys you have to push hard to get them to come to you. And even at that the biggest bulls will pack up the girls and leave. That is a young mans game trying to chase them down and make them fight. Popping over a 12,000' ridge and dropping into the next basin with them is more than my knees can handle like I did at 45. I know where they are going to go for the day so I try to cut them off. But the real game is to call the cows away from the bull. Man do they come in mad and fast. And if I don't kill them its OK cause I really pissed them off and had a ton of fun. A good 3 to 5 year old cow is better eating than a huge rut crazed bull anyway. And if you have not had the pleasure of cleaning a rutted up bull, it will tingle your nose.

Gselkhunter

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gselkhunter

Now life gets real, I did infact draw the unit I love to hunt. I will be there this weekend to finish off turkey season and to start elk scouting. I will get some pics to tease the mind.

Gselkhunter

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insanelupus

Very nice, we don't get quite the open bowls like you fellers get down there.  But it still looks nice.  I've discovered that when they can, the elk prefer to feed in those natural open places rather than the clear cuts, though they certainly will use the younger clear cuts when they have the opportunity.  And of course it depends on the time of year.  

I'll start doing some scouting in the next couple of weeks.  I'll have to travel for work for two weeks, but then I can hit it hard again in July.

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gselkhunter

The nice open areas at the bottom of the picture is not where the elk hang out. Go up! The ridges up higher with the aspen and pine is where I kill most of them. FYI, what looks open up higher is aspen that has not leafed out yet. It isn't as open as it appears.

Gselkhunter

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insanelupus
Ahhhh, okay.  But don't the elk feed in that open meadow at night?  Assuming of course it has decent grass, I'd figure during the rut that the cows would be feeding there and moving up to bed.
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gselkhunter

That little meadow is on the road, camp sites all over the place. But a very good place to take a picture.

Gselkhunter

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How far is it from the meadow in the front to the tree line in the back of the picture?
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gselkhunter

Timberline is around 3.5miles away. The mountain on the left is a little over 13,300ft tall. The timbered cone in front of the snowy mountain on the right is about 2.5 miles away and that cone hits 10,850ft. The mountain behind it is 12,000 and some change and about a mile and a half away from the cone.

There are 3 peaks that make up Buffalo Peaks, West Buffalo, East Buffalo and Marmot Peak. It is a very nice place.

Gselkhunter

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gselkhunter

At the bottom of the hill in the meadow there is a creek with brookies in it. So there is more to do than hunt elk. Dusky grouse, teal, big horns, mule deer, pronghorn and they tell me there are Ptarmigan on the peaks, but I have never seen them. What few roads that are left are great for riding mountain bikes. Miles of hiking trails. In July there are so many wild flowers above timberline, my home away from home.

Gselkhunter

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