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uplandchessies

Woodcock mounts.

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Longrifle
That is a cool looking mount.

Thanks, my guy does this on the side, so the turn around time is slow but he does good work. Son's first, and a big one that didn't show a pellet on the right

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gonehuntin
In my minds eye, this is what I see when I think of woodcock.

Woodcock20Twosome_zps77d33079.jpg

I had my first mounted in a similar pose about 20 years ago by a national champion turkey taxidermist who had never done a woodcock before.

wc3JPG.jpg

That mount is great Mike. That is exactly how I think of those great little birds.

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shorebird
Looking at Mike Campbell's picture with the shotgun, bird and shells I noticed his paper shells were Winchester Thicket loads. Can someone tell me more about them?  What made them special? How were they loaded?

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mike campbell

Gonehuntin,

Thanks. People are sometimes surprised at the size of the bird when they first see the mount.

Those Western Thicket loads are pre-WWII.

DSC_0009-001_zps035a711c.jpg

The 2-piece Western Xpert box would be from the 20's and the one-piece from the 30's.

I've never dissected one of those pre-war shells, so I don't know how the spreader effect was constructed. By the late 40's the migration to pie-crimps was underway, but Western and Remington still offered their spreader loads in roll-crimped hulls. This brochure illustrates that Western had renamed the Xpert spreader "Brush Loads."

BRUSHLOADS_zpsc30c0352.jpg

They were still roll-crimped and the spreader device was a cardboard insert that divided the shot column vertically into 4 chambers. This technique survives today. Kent factory loads, for one, utilize a plastic wad with the chambers molded in. The handloader version is plastic inserts called "diperser-X's." For awhile, the disperser X was my favorite approach to spreaders.

By the early 1950's the Western Xpert Brush Load was being made in a pie-crimped hull.

DSC_0016-002_zps911454d9.jpg

The Remington version was called a "Scatter Load" and it, too, was one of the last roll-crimped shells to leave the factory lineup as evidenced by this brochure  from the late 1940's.

SCATTERLOADS_zps7fd520c7.jpg

Couldn't lay hands on a pic, but the Scatter load was constructed by dividing the shot column horizontally into 3 (IIRC) chambers. Layers of shot were contained between card wads.

IMO, the most advanced spreader load (as I've often discussed) is a variation on this technique with the Polywad Spred-R disc loaded over the bulk of the shot load and the remaining 1/8 ounce placed on top.

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Treerooster

That's his bribe to try and get fish and game to let him keep it.

They were serious about getting it, they called me last Friday and asked to it's where abouts, everyone in the office new it was coming!

You are talking about the dollar....right?

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shorebird

Mike,

As usual, your knowledge of shells and guns is very informative. Thank you for posting this up.

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dogrunner
Wow- three bands. I'd like to read the story on that.-TD

It was a rainy saturday Sept 30, 2006. Dad and I headed north but the rain made us do some shopping in the morning. Then we went to a cover we have hunted in the past that usually holds a good number of birds. Well this day we hit the mother load of longbeaks and grouse. After getting the 6 wc and a couple grouse we got back to the truck. Once we started pulling birds out our coats I noticed a band on 1 so I looked at the others and 2 more had bands. They bands are fairly small and having never seen one before we were surprised to have 3 especially in a single spot. So I looked at the bands and called them in to USGS. 1 bird was banded on 5/3/2006 and was to young to fly. The other 2 were banded on 5/15/2006 and had secessive numbers so they were in the same clutch and also to young to fly. The same person banded all 3 birds. They only moved about 20 miles from where they were banded. They were not in the best shape for mounting as the top bird got centered by the 28 gauge and has holes through the beak, but we had them done anyway to remember a great day in the uplands.

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Travis

Here is a nice mount we had done.

DSCN6355.jpg

DSCN6353.jpg

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mike campbell

Travis;

I LIKE!  :love:

Can you share the taxidermist's info?

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Travis

The taxidermist is Brian Yancino in Connecticut. His number is 860-230-0699. Brian is the BEST taxidermist for birds I have ever seen and he has the awards to prove it.

He is VERY particular about the birds he will work with, they need to be in primo shape. He is expensive, but as you can see, its worth it.

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uplandchessies
Very nice, Travis. Not loving the driftwood though. I'm excited to get mine back (other than the taxidermy bill).

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