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Hillhaven09

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Hillhaven09
Looking for suggestions for upland books to get me through the winter or at least till the WC return. I know that this has been talked about, but I suck at using the search engine on the site.  I already own some of the classics so I am looking for other options.  Thanks guys

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atticus
I really enjoyed Timberdoodle Tales By Tom Waters

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Briarscratch

Not Upland, but we're entering the depths of winter and good books help pass the cold gray days.

Check out Bernard Cornwell's The Winter King.  It's the first in a trilogy about the time of Arthur, the late 400s, when the Britons fought a desperate battle against the encroaching Saxons.   I'm reading the series for the third time and it's as powerful as the first.   I've read a lot of books over the years, but these three - The Winter King, Enemy of God and Excalibur are my favorites.  

A line after one of the most pivotal battles of the series:

"For we had won. We had turned the fields beside the river into a slaughterhouse.  We had saved Britain and fulfilled Arthur's dream.  We were the kings of slaughter and the lords of the dead, and we howled our bloody triumph at the sky....For the power of the Sais was broken."

But there'a a lot more than just slaughter.  Loyalty, friendship, honor, love, betrayal, revenge...  

Another Cornwall recommendation would be  the Saxon series.  This was set a few hundred years later when the Saxons who ultimately won over the Britons and populated England were under attack from the Vikings.  Set during the time of King Alfred, it's another incredible series that will completely absorb you.

http://www.bernardcornwell.net/

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DennisMcFeely

Any of Tom Word's three books about bird dogs:

-None Held Back

-A Little Competition

-The Ninth Pup: Quail Plantation Stories

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MTRookie76
Not Upland, but we're entering the depths of winter and good books help pass the cold gray days.

Check out Bernard Cornwell's The Winter King.  It's the first in a trilogy about the time of Arthur, the late 400s, when the Britons fought a desperate battle against the encroaching Saxons.   I'm reading the series for the third time and it's as powerful as the first.   I've read a lot of books over the years, but these three - The Winter King, Enemy of God and Excalibur are my favorites.  

A line after one of the most pivotal battles of the series:

"For we had won. We had turned the fields beside the river into a slaughterhouse.  We had saved Britain and fulfilled Arthur's dream.  We were the kings of slaughter and the lords of the dead, and we howled our bloody triumph at the sky....For the power of the Sais was broken."

But there'a a lot more than just slaughter.  Loyalty, friendship, honor, love, betrayal, revenge...  

Another Cornwall recommendation would be  the Saxon series.  This was set a few hundred years later when the Saxons who ultimately won over the Britons and populated England were under attack from the Vikings.  Set during the time of King Alfred, it's another incredible series that will completely absorb you.

http://www.bernardcornwell.net/

+1

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Remo
Brown Feathers:  by Steven J. Mulak

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apachecadillac

Warning.  Off the wall.  But the Hook and Bullet Press is now offering a new flavor.

Before Christmas I bought a couple of books to give my daughter about hunting.  One was Girl Hunter.  The other was The Call of the Mild.  Recently I bought something called Hunt, Gather, Cook, a celebration of fishing and foraging, hunting and cooking.  Finally, there is a magazine/website called, get this, Garden and Gun.

Go figure.

This stuff is a long way from Sports Afield, Jack O'Connor or Havilah Babcock.  Maybe Jim Harrison and Guy de Valdene are a little closer.  Needless to say, Girl Hunter is not a teenage boy's guide to scoring a cheerleader, and you should be warned that Hunt, Gather, Cook is about a third recipes.

I'm not sure to make of it all.  Partly, it's the logical progression from farmer's markets and the regional foodshed, from produce shares sold by a truck farm an hour from the city and the locavore movement.  People are realizing that the ultimate free range organic chicken is a pheasant.  Admittedly, there is an element of, 'Now that I've made my highland cranberry syrup I better go shoot me a grouse to pour it over.'  But there is more to it than that.  If this keeps up and isn't just a passing fad, there are going to be some big time changes in attitude.  And, incidentally, hunting will survive into the future.

Well, not to hijack your thread.  Let's just say that if you want something different for your fireside reading, it's out there.  Not 50 Shades of Gray for sure, but at a minimum a celebration of what the hunter sportsman was once taught to disdain as 'meat hunting'.

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Hillhaven09
Thanks guys, please keep them coming.  I have looked and ordered some of these already and was able to find them at good prices.  It seems with upland books some are priced decent and some are sky high.

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ccavacini

Here's a short story for you.  Used to have my freshmen read it for its theme...somewhat of an open ended ending:

What Happened During the Ice Storm

by Jim Heynen

One winter there was a freezing rain. How beautiful! people said when things outside started to

shine with ice. But the freezing rain kept coming. Tree branches glistened like glass. Then broke

like glass. Ice thickened on the windows until everything outside blurred. Farmers moved their

livestock into the barns, and most animals were safe. But not the pheasants. Their eyes froze shut.

Some farmers went ice-skating down the gravel roads with clubs to harvest the pheasants that

sat helplessly in the roadside ditches. The boys went out into the freezing rain to find pheasants

too. They saw dark spots along a fence. Pheasants, all right. Five or six of them. The boys slid

their feet along slowly, trying not to break the ice that covered the snow. They slid up close to the

pheasants. The pheasants pulled their heads down between their wings. They couldn't tell how

easy it was to see them huddled there.

The boys stood still in the icy rain. Their breath came out in slow puffs of steam. The

pheasants' breath came out in quick little white puffs. Some of them lifted their heads and turned

them from side to side, but they were blindfolded with ice and didn't flush. The boys had not

brought clubs, or sacks, or anything but themselves. They stood over the pheasants, turning their

own heads, looking at each other, each expecting the other to do something. To pounce on a

pheasant, or to yell Bang! Things around them were shining and dripping with icy rain. The

barbed-wire fence. The fence posts. The broken stems of grass. Even the grass seeds. The grass

seeds looked like little yolks inside gelatin whites. And the pheasants looked like unborn birds

glazed in egg white. Ice was hardening on the boys' caps and coats. Soon they would be covered

with ice too.

Then one of the boys said, Shh. He was taking off his coat, the thin layer of ice splintering in

flakes as he pulled his arms from the sleeves. But the inside of the coat was dry and warm. He

covered two of the crouching pheasants with his coat, rounding the back of it over them like a

shell. The other boys did the same. They covered all the helpless pheasants. The small gray hens

and the larger brown cocks. Now the boys felt the rain soaking through their shirts and freezing.

They ran across the slippery fields, unsure of their footing, the ice clinging to their skin as they

made their way toward the blurry lights of the house.

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Rex Hoppie
Is that a true story?

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ccavacini
Is that a true story?

Heynen is a teacher who writes a lot of short prose on young farm boys.

Most short stories are fiction, and I assume this story is too.

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ScottGrush

With you in mind I'd have to recommend..............

The Complete book of WOODCOCK HUNTING by Woolner.

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Guest

its non upland but I just got sucked into "a game of thrones" its pretty good for fantasy.

"a tattered autumn sky" by tom davis should be in every bird hunters library. unless you are of strong constitution I would recommend reading it during hunting season or right before; it will get you jonesing pretty bad.

"the wild marsh" by Rick Bass is a fantastic read. I hate to compare, but it has strong tones of " a sand county almanac" not so much a book of hunting but a book for hunter/naturalists.

"the wild ones" by john D Taylor. this is getting stoked for an upland road trip reading. guaranteed to cure post season depression... or to cause it.

if you want to jump into the way back machine "the upland shooting life" by GBE is a good one. its pretty cool how he delves into all the different facets of upland hunting. even hunting partner profiles and a little psychology.

much of its pretty dated but you will also find in this book that many parts of upland hunting never change.

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Checo

X2 on Woolners books.  The one on woodcock hunting and he also wrote one on grouse hunting.  Similar in alot of ways but you should get both if you can.

Dennis Walrod's book on grouse hunting.

Furtmans book (Woodland Drummer) about grouse.

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