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Hillhaven09

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SydneyWI

Bloodties by Ted Kerasote

Not exactly upland, but an excellent read on hunting in general.

Bloodties

Here's the description from Amazon,

For all readers who are perplexed over humanity's proper relationship to animals, Ted Kerasote's provocative exploration of the ancient human urge to hunt will dramatize the issues that fuel this controversial debate. In his opening section, "Food" the author travels to the frozen shores of coastal Greenland, living and hunting with Inuit villagers-true hunter-gatherers-who are utterly dependent for sustenance on the seals, polar bears, and narwhal that they can wrest from their punishing environment. In "Trophies," Kerasote accompanies the first Western sportsmen permitted into a remote stretch of Siberian wilderness, one of whom uses unethical stratagems to bag the worlds most coveted hunting trophy. In "Webs," we meet a hunter caught between these two extremes-the writer himself. Stalking elk near his home in Wyoming, seeking a winter's worth of meat, Kerasote encounters the pall of himself that yearns to make the kill and take the wild creature's life force into his own body.

Nearing the end of his odyssey, the author attends meetings of the Fund for Animals with the organization's director, a vehement opponent of hunting. Kerasote also examines the ecological consequences of eating food produced by our agri-business system and transported in fossil fuel-consuming refrigerator trucks; next he considers the environmental impact of the death of the prey that has given its life to the hunter. Scrupulously balanced, Bloodties is a memorable book for all lovers of the outdoors-both hunters and nonhunters-and a landmark in the evolving discussion of our proper relationship to the animal world.

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Jack L

A lot of great books referenced here.  Some others I like are:

Voices on the Wind-C.Stanley Mason

Upland Autumn-William Tapply, Jr

Colter- Rick Bass,

Dancers in the Sunset Sky- Robert F. Jones(& The Hunter in My Heart)

A High Lonesome Call-Robert Holthouser

Bobs, Brush and Brittanies-Joel Vance

Pheasant Hunter's Harvest-Steve Grooms

Pheasants of the Mind-Datus Proper

The Last Hunter-Will Weaver

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Laminarman

Another vote for Tattered Autumn Sky.  Just excellent.

As well a vote for Propers' Pheasants of the Mind.  

Try Guy Valdenes Red Stag for an easy to read novel about the aristrocratic game shooting and family life of a castle dwelling family.  

What, no Harry Middleton????  !!

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Jack L
Another vote for Tattered Autumn Sky.  Just excellent.

As well a vote for Propers' Pheasants of the Mind.  

Try Guy Valdenes Red Stag for an easy to read novel about the aristrocratic game shooting and family life of a castle dwelling family.  

What, no Harry Middleton????  !!

I was sticking to upland books.  Good call, Harry Middleton is an enjoyable and interesting read.

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landrover
My Friend the Partridge by S.T. Hammond

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caleb
Alice Marie Krayenbraak was standing on the screened porch when she heard shots coming from a neighbor's farm--one loud blast after another, the sounds of a twelve gauge. Each time she thought the shooting had stopped, it would start again. Some shots were followed by moments of silence, but others were followed by guttural squeals, like pathetic last-second objections. Sometimes a new blast came before the last squeal stopped. The time between shots got shorter, as if someone was hurrying to get this done.

The kitchen door opened and Alice's father stepped onto the porch with her.

"You don't have to hear this," he said.

The four-foot sections of screens were gray from the summer's dust, giving a hazy view of the feedlots and beyond them the corn and soybean fields that extended in the direction of Ben Van Doods's farm. The buffer of trees and dusty screens might have absorbed the sounds, but instead it caught the blasts and flung them back into the air for a second life, like an echo--or an aftershock. Alice could see the cupolas of Ben's tallest barn and the green domes of trees in his grove, but she could not see the scene on the ground.

"Aldah sure shouldn't hear this," said Alice's father. "Go inside and have her watch some television. Play piano for her or something."

"What's going on?"

"Today's market report."

"What's going on?"

Alice stepped closer to the screen, which prompted her father to move in front of the screen door to keep her from stepping outside and closer to the gunshots.

"Ben must figure it's cheaper to shoot them than truck them to market."

Her father's shoulders twitched with each blast. If Ben was doing this by himself, he was getting faster and faster at it. Now there was squealing before the gun blasts, frantic squeals as if animals were trapped in a corner. The ones that were left must have known what was coming.

"Go take care of Aldah."

Alice didn't move. "She probably can't hear it," she said. "Mother is probably covering Aldah's ears."

"Your mother is covering her own ears," said her father. "Get inside."

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apachecadillac
Those look like interesting recommendations, fishnfowler.  I just took a flyer on the Chase book.  That's a part of the world that I dearly love.  Thanks.

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Ben Hong

5 pages of recommendations and no one has mentioned our own "chiendog's" (Craig Koshyk) opus - Pointing Dogs, Volume One, The Continentals. See left side bar.

This is THE ultimate reference guide for the continental pointing dogs, all superb pictures done by Craig himself, all writing done by Craig himself and he has seen every breed written about in the book working in the field in their home environment.

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landrover
Shotgunning in the Uplands by Ray Holland

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landrover
A Hunter's Road: A Journey with Gun and Dog Across the American Uplands by Jim Fergus; Grouse and Woodcock: An Upland Hunters Book by Nick Sisley; American Partridge and Pheasant Shooting by Frank Schley

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Hillhaven09
Well guys thanks for all the suggestions.  Picked up quite a few and they have all been quite enjoyable so far.  Dennis I am really enjoying the 3 books you suggested and if anyone has not read A High Lonesome Call I seriously suggest it

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Dead Bird
I only read books with pictures! LOL  HOOKEDONFONICSWORKEDFERME!!!!!!!!!!!  LOL   Sorry man I just couldn't resist.

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Wet Dog

I just read "A Season on the Allegheny".  Decent read.  I grew up in St. Marys, Pa and also spent some time in Marienville.  The Allegheny was literally my back yard for many years.

The author covers a year of hunting in the national forest and talks about the history of the forest, the local culture, and the battles between different political agendas in managing the resources of the forest.  Very interesting, to me anyway.  Others familiar to the area may enjoy it too.

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landrover
Where the Dirt Road Ends: Ruminations by a Yankee Bird Hunter by Jonathan Phillips; Feathers Preferred: A Sportsman's Soliloquy by W. Austin Peters

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Beedog

5 pages of recommendations and no one has mentioned our own "chiendog's" (Craig Koshyk) opus - Pointing Dogs, Volume One, The Continentals. See left side bar.

This is THE ultimate reference guide for the continental pointing dogs, all superb pictures done by Craig himself, all writing done by Craig himself and he has seen every breed written about in the book working in the field in their home environment.

x 2.  Placed an order a week or two ago having read several excerpts from the book on Craig Koshyk's site http://www.pointingdogblog.blogspot.ca/ .   Book came this past week ... my high expectations have been exceeded.

Lucid and detailed descriptions of the continental breeds, their origins, selection and breeding, appearance and form, use and function, etc.  Wonderful photos as well.

Just checked the website ... the book is still on sale for a very reasonable price.

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