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ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH


greypartridge

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Graypartridge,

What I said was a bit tongue-in-cheek in cheek, but I guess it is a sensitive subject for you.  I wish you the best, wherever you end up.

As an aside, I've spent the last 30 years working as a civil/environmental engineer here in Colorado.  Mostly involved with large water supply projects, water and wastewater treatment.  Many would argue (rightly in my mind) that there are way too many large infrastructure projects in the works.  But that has always been, and probably always be, a problem here in the west.

Best of luck......

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greypartridge

I am not personally attacking anyone who lives in Colorado for their careers,work, or family. It is a very beautiful state from a distance. The weather (outside of the droughts) and the amount of sunshine is pleasant. There is lots of activities that any big city has to offer. Colorado has great colleges. There are many worse areas to live and work.

What I have issues with is the fringe element that has become an increasing large part of the population . The LUNATIC FRINGE.

A great western state that had great traditions of the west and western freedoms. Guns,hunting ,fishing,trapping and access to the resources. Much of the best lands have ended up in private hands. The available resources are stressed. The elk grow to about two years old and are then harvested....The people that are controlling the state have never had elk tenderloin or fired a shotgun. They do not know the difference between a Rocky Mtn Bighorn and a Mtn Goat.These granola crunchers are anti hunting but they are the ones developing subdivision in wildlife corridors. They are the ones building homes in the wildlife's  winter range. They are killing more wildlife than any hunting has in recent times.

The other issue I have is the group of people who continue to promote the state as this wonderful wilderness. We who have lived here and have seen the change can only roll our eyes and laugh.

Colorado has become one giant theme park....where everything has become and has to be micro managed. Everything is so commercialized its a lot like Disney land.

You boys that think you are in mecca ..... Keep Drinking the Kool-Aid .  Keep convincing yourselves and like minded  :p

thinkers and keep them moving in.

Over and Out.....of Colorado that is :D

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greypartridge
Graypartridge,

What I said was a bit tongue-in-cheek in cheek, but I guess it is a sensitive subject for you.  I wish you the best, wherever you end up.

Best of luck......

Thank you for the clarification ....What you do career wise is needed.

Best to you also Parallell

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bosco mctavitch
I escaped Colorado in 1996, before I really knew what I was escaping from.  I hear you, the front range is really overcrowded and seems like part of Orange County, CA...but really, get a grip.  I don't even really know my way around Colorado anymore and on short vacations Ive had absolutely no problem sneaking up on decent mulies and elk while hiking (DURING the season) and Ive had zero shortage of quality fishing for good sized rainbows and cut throats, and no crowds either, and ive barely scratched the surface.  Are you limiting yourself to roadside stuff within an hour of denver/boulder?  Sounds like it.  It's not Alaska, but then again neither is anywhere else in the lower 48...  I'm not saying it's perfect, but the picture you paint says as much about you as it does about CO.  

Wont argue on the politics though.

I admit I have been spoiled.

This place is really pretty strange though. Your sister lives in Boulder .....right?

My brother in law, he's in Denver.  Personally I can't stand the front range around Denver/boulder, and I hear even ft Collins is now part of the megasprawl.  I was in Denver in early February for the SIA show, and we took some of my foreign colleagues up to Boulder for dinner and to visit some clients.  Man, that whole town is one big strip mall, it's really lost any semblance of class or character that it once had if you ask me.  Nevertheless, in my visits over just the past couple years we've had a great time visiting some of the areas that aren't so overrun--pretty much any area that isn't on the front range and isn't a resort town we felt right at home.  Maybe I am naive about opportunities elsewhere, but it's been really very easy to go and have a great time fishing when we've been there, and I would say many of the places we went rivaled anyplace Ive ever been in the Rockies and west for quality of fishing.  I haven't elk hunted there, but the one close friend I have there who is an elkaholic seems to always have meat in the freezer, and he's not one to rub shoulders with anyone else.  I completely hear what you are saying, because I often lament the same thing happening where I live...the only issue is that that's happening virtually EVERYWHERE that I'd ever care to live.  What with high speed Internet and states investing in better rural access to services as an economic driver, it's getting increasingly difficult to find ANYWHERE that retains much of the character and spirit they had 20+ years ago, and it's now even possible for someone to live there and make a decent living in many cases...makes it hard to get off the beaten track!

Personally, I'm curious about where you are going and specifically what drew you there, because even knowing it reasonably well and having lived there 20 years ago, I still think Colorado has a lot to offer for someone who likes hunting and fishing, and the politics may be screwy, but so are so many other places...in relative terms they could be a LOT worse.

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Kansas Big Dog
it's getting increasingly difficult to find ANYWHERE that retains much of the character and spirit they had 20+ years ago,

Maybe, mabe not.   :D

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LostintheOzone

I haven't been to CO. recently (3 years) but I found the area around Pagosa Springs and Durango pleasant. I think I'm a pretty fair judge of what an area has to offer as I lived and worked in the Rockie Mtn. states for many years.

It sounds like you may be too close to a large metro area. I wouldn't live in Denver or anywhere close to it. I moved to Seattle in 1975 and it was a decent place to live then but not now. I'm now 80 miles from that f'd up place and I'm getting pavement dwellers moving in next door escaping from the mass insanity of a large metro area. I have to drive 5 hours to get to hunt much of anything.

We have relatives in Pagosa Springs and they love it. They hike a lot and are outdoors people. He keeps telling me what a great place it is to live.

Jim

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LostintheOzone

Still, I'd live there if I could.  You can always shoot back.

The code of the west. You would love it. Just remember, whiskey's for drinkin, waters for fightin.  :D

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Chris Raymond
For those of you that want to live in a place that is rural and with characteristics (and characters) like you remembered growing up, to include unlimited opportunities for hunting and fishing, you may want to consider the U.P. of Michigan.  In many respects it is a step back in time.  There isn't really a metropolis if that's your thing however, although Marquette is a decent enough small town representation.  Oh, and you probably need to have a fairly decent tolerance of winter (snow much more than cold) and bugs (at certain times of the year).  Do take note though, it's not for everyone.
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I'm wondering if Colorado is not getting more like Hawaii. One fellow described Hawaii as an extremely beautiful woman whose angelic face and flawless body distract attention from her broken nails, poorly applied makeup and disheveled hair......pretty appropriate out here.
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bosco mctavitch

it's getting increasingly difficult to find ANYWHERE that retains much of the character and spirit they had 20+ years ago,

Maybe, mabe not.   :D

Let me re-phrase...to add "...if you dont bring your own work".  Some people in some professions can make it work, others simply cannot.  If a place has yet to be overrun, there's a REASON for that!

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I was stationed in Colo Springs 78-81 and it was wonderful, even after the Corps sent me to Kansas City for recruiting duty I would go back 3-4 times a year to fish the Arkansas and hunt elk/muleys. Started noticing the increased fishing pressure and areas that before where I never saw a sole becoming crowded. My last trip was in 02 and where I had once fished was by then a zoo, now its Montana. Semper Fi
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I just remembered an old friend of mine who was renting an apartment in Denver somewhere.  He was looking to lose some weight and get in shape for hunting season and started jogging. I asked him how far he was jogging and he said "how fast and how far depends on the gun shots"  :D
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If a place has yet to be overrun, there's a REASON for that!

I would agree, but, the reason may not be, and probably is not because of income.  Most of the places that are over run have higher incomes than those places that have retained there character and spirit, those places have lower incomes and lower living expenses.  If you live frugally and do not expect to live "high on the hog", many of the places that have character and spirit are still obtainable.

Oops, this post was written by KBD.

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bosco mctavitch
Fireside/kbd, that's completely true in some cases, but it also depends on what you do for a living and exactly what you're looking for. I could only live in a few places in the country doing what I do for a living.  And, as an avid skier and climber, I couldnt live in Kansas as an example, without giving up something thats very important to me.  Since I'm not really qualified to do anything else, and I dont want to make major lifestyle changes, it could get hard to even live in a lot of places frugally!  :p. I'm referring to the places where there is a convergence of attitude/politics, elbow room and outdoor activities, and economic opportunity for a broad spectrum of higher-paying jobs.  That convergence is the reason I'm referring to, and I would say it's harder to find than I'd like.  There a plenty of places that have one or two of those attributes, but without the third--whichever one that happens to be--they are relegated to "nice places to visit".
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Kansas Big Dog
And, as an avid skier and climber, I couldnt live in Kansas as an example, without giving up something thats very important to me.  

Hey, we have Mt. Sunflower at 4000'!  Ok, ok, it is really just a big hill.   :D

But, I have been told that Labs do well on phez, especially pointing Labs.

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