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ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH


greypartridge

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I have been following this thread, biting my tongue and wondering if some of you guys really live here. Don't post much, but here's my 2 cents. Moved here in 1977 and after 35 years there have indeed been some changes. If you moved to the crowded Denver metro area or Front Range area, what would you expect to find here?

I'm no fan of much of the politics here lately either, but I have seen the political pendulum swing here before and it can again....one thing I have done is to be and remain involved politically to be sure my voice is heard. If you live here I'm sure you witnessed the last election for governor....what a debacle for the Republicans...they have no one to blame but themselves for their loss and now we pay the price. You say you don't like the politics here and have decided to leave....that's exactly what the libs want you to do. I have alot invested in Colorado and won't give up that easily.

Regarding marijuana, I don't use it, but I applaud the legalization of it....too much blood and treasure and freedom has been given up in a drug war that like the prohibition of alcohol, has never worked.

As far as growth and crowds.... yes, there are a lot of people along the front range and in the mountain valleys... it can get crowded if you frequent the popular places and it has had some effect on wildlife....but those people bring jobs and prosperity...Colorado has been very good to me over the years because of growth...it is a two edged sword...it has negative impacts, but it also creates opportunity...both economically and culturally. If you like that sort of thing, and I do, Colorado now has great sports, art, music, etc...something that you won't find in a back water town or state. But even backwater towns in places like rural Kansas and Nebraska can be crowded during peak seasons.

Now on to the hunting and fishing....just wondering if you guys that are bitching have really paid your dues here? Have you ever bothered to ask anyone for access to private land? I mean really worked at it? Have you been active in any local conservation organizations (ie: Pheasants Forever, TU, DU, RMEF, NWTF, etc.)?? Not just by going to a banquet once a year, but by really being involved. Ever been to a Wildlife Commisson meeting and voiced your opinion or volunteered with the Division of Wildlife? I don't find Coloradans in general  to be unfriendly to hunters at all and after years of actively asking landownwers for access and being involved I have more places to hunt and fish than I have time to go to every season, some of them quite close to home....you gotta pay your dues here in Colorado if you want access to any private land....I don't believe it's much different anywhere else.

I don't exclusively use private land either, I have taken many quality fish, big game animals, turkeys, waterfowl and upland birds from public land in Colorado....there are more opportunities on public property here for great fishing and hunting than you can shake a stick at if you are willing to work at it.  There are still lots and lots of places to go and find solitude and good sporting opportunities in this state, even close to Denver if you look. If you don't want to catch worn out or tiny stocker trout, do your homework, walk a ways and yes, travel a bit...it has been that way here since I arrived.

I don't often frequent "pay to play" areas such as state parks and I agree they can be expensive and crowded at times, but they serve a purpose for a certain segment of the population and provide places for the tourists to go.

In closing, I want to say that I love this beautiful, bountiful state, the diverse wildlife populations and all it has to offer. Living in colorful Colorado has been a blessing for me. I  can't imagine living anywhere else. I believe you get out of life (and Colorado) what you are willing to put into it. You have to be involved and pay your dues here, otherwise you will be one of those transient people who think that just by moving here you'll be happy and right away catch quality fish, get your elk and shoot limits of birds...then when things don't go your way you get discouraged, start complaining and move on. No place is perfect and I guess it bugs me to hear all of the critical comments made toward my home, this great state of Colorado. If you don't like it here, don't want to try to make things better and want to move on, I say don't let the door hit you in the ass on the way out.

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I have been following this thread, biting my tongue and wondering if some of you guys really live here. Don't post much, but here's my 2 cents. Moved here in 1977 and after 35 years there have indeed been some changes. If you moved to the crowded Denver metro area or Front Range area, what would you expect to find here?

I'm no fan of much of the politics here lately either, but I have seen the political pendulum swing here before and it can again....one thing I have done is to be and remain involved politically to be sure my voice is heard. If you live here I'm sure you witnessed the last election for governor....what a debacle for the Republicans...they have no one to blame but themselves for their loss and now we pay the price. You say you don't like the politics here and have decided to leave....that's exactly what the libs want you to do. I have alot invested in Colorado and won't give up that easily.

Regarding marijuana, I don't use it, but I applaud the legalization of it....too much blood and treasure and freedom has been given up in a drug war that like the prohibition of alcohol, has never worked.

As far as growth and crowds.... yes, there are a lot of people along the front range and in the mountain valleys... it can get crowded if you frequent the popular places and it has had some effect on wildlife....but those people bring jobs and prosperity...Colorado has been very good to me over the years because of growth...it is a two edged sword...it has negative impacts, but it also creates opportunity...both economically and culturally. If you like that sort of thing, and I do, Colorado now has great sports, art, music, etc...something that you won't find in a back water town or state. But even backwater towns in places like rural Kansas and Nebraska can be crowded during peak seasons.

Now on to the hunting and fishing....just wondering if you guys that are bitching have really paid your dues here? Have you ever bothered to ask anyone for access to private land? I mean really worked at it? Have you been active in any local conservation organizations (ie: Pheasants Forever, TU, DU, RMEF, NWTF, etc.)?? Not just by going to a banquet once a year, but by really being involved. Ever been to a Wildlife Commisson meeting and voiced your opinion or volunteered with the Division of Wildlife? I don't find Coloradans in general  to be unfriendly to hunters at all and after years of actively asking landownwers for access and being involved I have more places to hunt and fish than I have time to go to every season, some of them quite close to home....you gotta pay your dues here in Colorado if you want access to any private land....I don't believe it's much different anywhere else.

I don't exclusively use private land either, I have taken many quality fish, big game animals, turkeys, waterfowl and upland birds from public land in Colorado....there are more opportunities on public property here for great fishing and hunting than you can shake a stick at if you are willing to work at it.  There are still lots and lots of places to go and find solitude and good sporting opportunities in this state, even close to Denver if you look. If you don't want to catch worn out or tiny stocker trout, do your homework, walk a ways and yes, travel a bit...it has been that way here since I arrived.

I don't often frequent "pay to play" areas such as state parks and I agree they can be expensive and crowded at times, but they serve a purpose for a certain segment of the population and provide places for the tourists to go.

In closing, I want to say that I love this beautiful, bountiful state, the diverse wildlife populations and all it has to offer. Living in colorful Colorado has been a blessing for me. I  can't imagine living anywhere else. I believe you get out of life (and Colorado) what you are willing to put into it. You have to be involved and pay your dues here, otherwise you will be one of those transient people who think that just by moving here you'll be happy and right away catch quality fish, get your elk and shoot limits of birds...then when things don't go your way you get discouraged, start complaining and move on. No place is perfect and I guess it bugs me to hear all of the critical comments made toward my home, this great state of Colorado. If you don't like it here, don't want to try to make things better and want to move on, I say don't let the door hit you in the ass on the way out.

+2 cept I kinda like the politics! The best line in Over and Under's essay is you get out what you put in. I would say you can multiply what you get out. Colorado is a great states that DOES tolerate different ideas and dreams, how the hell can you beat that?

Billy

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North Dakota Hntr
+2 cept I kinda like the politics! The best line in Over and Under's essay is you get out what you put in. I would say you can multiply what you get out. Colorado is a great states that DOES tolerate different ideas and dreams, how the hell can you beat that?

Billy

Yeah, just like North Dakota. :<img src=:'>

Oh, so you're one of them eh Billy. That's OK and you can still stay here if want. Just use the back door please and no pot smokin in the house. That's what garages are for. Also, if you have Oba$# licence plates most people will understand if the plates are CO and you'll just get an egg or two but,, I would still suggest a layer of mud over them, just to be safe..

Craig

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Just got back from a road trip down to Colorado and the Denver area.

  I knew the weather was going to be ideal on the drive down so drive down through Utah then east on I-70.    

 Magnificent Colorado country from the Utah state line first following the Colorado river going past the Colorado Canyon lands of red rock, up through beautiful Glenwood Canyon, over Vail Pass then through the Eisenhower Tunnel and down through Georgetown while looking for bighorn sheep then down the mountain in to Denver. God's country for sure.  

 But in the words of Bob Seeger...Get outta Denver baby!  :D

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HuntersDad
I do most of my grouse hunting west of the tunnel, beautiful country for sure...
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