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Skeet and/or Sporting Clays and Golf


Skeet and/or Sporting Clays and Golf  

  1. 1. Skeet and/or Sporting Clays and Golf

    • I shoot skeet and/or sporting clays and I also play golf
      I shoot skeet and/or sporting clays and I also play golf
    • I shoot skeet and/or sporting clays but I do not play golf
      I shoot skeet and/or sporting clays and I also play golf
    • I do not shoot skeet and/or sporting clays but I do play golf
      I shoot skeet and/or sporting clays and I also play golf
    • I do not shoot skeet and/or sporting clays and I do not play golf
      I shoot skeet and/or sporting clays and I also play golf


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Greg Hartman

You want to get ahead in the transportation industry?

Learn to golf.

I think this is true of any industry. I can remember being at business meetings and before an actually meeting began, the attendees talked golf. My company also sent teams to participate in charity golf games...nice perk if one played. I suspect that a lot of business is discussed on the golf course; far more than is discussed on a shooting range. But since I don't play golf can't say for sure.

When I was first starting out in my career, I was (and am) most definitely NOT the golf/country club type.  I literally didn’t know how to tie a tie because no one I knew wore one (learned that quickly, of course).  I’m a serious guy, not much for small talk, and was uncomfortable in such “social” environments and have never been a drinker.  I thought I would never be successful, because I could never meet the wealthy business owners/buyers who were the target audience for my services.  

But you know what, I was dead wrong.  I did real fine – at least as well as the most "prominent" country club/golf - type lawyers in town.  

Why?  Because I discovered that there were plenty of people just like me out there (i.e. from a poor background and not the least bit “social”), and that such people owned/bought businesses in pretty much the same ratio as the country club/golf types.  Such people were no more comfortable with the country club/golf types that I was, but they were comfortable with me and I was comfortable with them.  I also discovered to my surprise that a lot of the truly successful country club/golf types (by no means are all country club/golf types truly successful – many, if not most, are wanna-bes pretending to be something they are not) preferred to not have their lawyer (who is the repository of their deepest, darkest business secrets) be a part of their social circle and run into him every day.

I guess my point is:  Just be who you are. Work hard, be honest and ethical and produce excellent results (results are all that really matters) and you don’t need to pretend on the golf course or at the country club.

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drummer's stump
You want to get ahead in the transportation industry?

Learn to golf.

I think this is true of any industry. I can remember being at business meetings and before an actually meeting began, the attendees talked golf. My company also sent teams to participate in charity golf games...nice perk if one played. I suspect that a lot of business is discussed on the golf course; far more than is discussed on a shooting range. But since I don't play golf can't say for sure.

This explains why I am a piss poor businessman.

I would say it has more to do with another reason, but I will not say just what that is.

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Why not combine them? Stand off to the side of the tee with your shotgun. See if you can hit the ball going down the fairway. For incomers wait near the green for the fairway shots coming in. Just a thought.
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Why not combine them? Stand off to the side of the tee with your shotgun. See if you can hit the ball going down the fairway. For incomers wait near the green for the fairway shots coming in. Just a thought.

I think they did that on Duck Dynasty, Jase and Willie hit balls while Si and Phil shot.

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You want to get ahead in the transportation industry?

Learn to golf.

I think this is true of any industry. I can remember being at business meetings and before an actually meeting began, the attendees talked golf. My company also sent teams to participate in charity golf games...nice perk if one played. I suspect that a lot of business is discussed on the golf course; far more than is discussed on a shooting range. But since I don't play golf can't say for sure.

This explains why I am a piss poor businessman.

I would say it has more to do with another reason, but I will not say just what that is.

It's my breath right?

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Chris Raymond
You want to get ahead in the transportation industry?

Learn to golf.

I think this is true of any industry. I can remember being at business meetings and before an actually meeting began, the attendees talked golf. My company also sent teams to participate in charity golf games...nice perk if one played. I suspect that a lot of business is discussed on the golf course; far more than is discussed on a shooting range. But since I don't play golf can't say for sure.

When I was first starting out in my career, I was (and am) most definitely NOT the golf/country club type.  I literally didn’t know how to tie a tie because no one I knew wore one (learned that quickly, of course).  I’m a serious guy, not much for small talk, and was uncomfortable in such “social” environments and have never been a drinker.  I thought I would never be successful, because I could never meet the wealthy business owners/buyers who were the target audience for my services.  

But you know what, I was dead wrong.  I did real fine – at least as well as the most "prominent" country club/golf - type lawyers in town.  

Why?  Because I discovered that there were plenty of people just like me out there (i.e. from a poor background and not the least bit “social”), and that such people owned/bought businesses in pretty much the same ratio as the country club/golf types.  Such people were no more comfortable with the country club/golf types that I was, but they were comfortable with me and I was comfortable with them.  I also discovered to my surprise that a lot of the truly successful country club/golf types (by no means are all country club/golf types truly successful – many, if not most, are wanna-bes pretending to be something they are not) preferred to not have their lawyer (who is the repository of their deepest, darkest business secrets) be a part of their social circle and run into him every day.

I guess my point is:  Just be who you are. Work hard, be honest and ethical and produce excellent results (results are all that really matters) and you don’t need to pretend on the golf course or at the country club.

Sound advice...and I'm a sales/sales management guy.

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I get about 50 rounds of golf in a year. Most of the guys I golf with are also hunters/fishermen. I have made connections in business but also been invited on hunting fishing excursions. One of the true benefits of golf is it's about a four mile walk. While it's not busting brush it usually involves some hills. Done two or three times a week it can't hurt. Accurately judging distances is also a side benefit. Yeah and then there's the nineteenth hole...!
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You want to get ahead in the transportation industry?

Learn to golf.

I think this is true of any industry. I can remember being at business meetings and before an actually meeting began, the attendees talked golf. My company also sent teams to participate in charity golf games...nice perk if one played. I suspect that a lot of business is discussed on the golf course; far more than is discussed on a shooting range. But since I don't play golf can't say for sure.

That's why I'm self-employed.

Don't want to play golf so I don't.

We get to shoot, hunt and fly fish often; my wife and I each average about 100 rounds of skeet, 5 stand or sporting clays per week.  Cost isn't an object but at our club trap, skeet and 5 stand are just $12 per 100.  Our favorite sporting clays ranges run $40 - $45 per 100 with a cart.

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Last time I played golf I sliced the ball into the cab of a moving dump truck. That's when I decided to take up running.
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I was thinking on our snowshoe walk last night that bird hunting and golf have a lot in common.

It is a gentleman's game.

We train our dogs the same as we pick our clubs. Tools that provide for our individual needs.

Looking forward to watching the Masters!

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Why not play both together?

Surprised no one has thrown this in the mix yet.  :D

You're the third person to mention this concept here, in this thread, Lars. The idea never seems to get any traction for some reason...

???

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You're the third person to mention this concept here, in this thread, Lars. The idea never seems to get any traction for some reason...

???

Yup a mystery, Tim. Everyone just seem to look beyond it.  ???   Sometimes great idea's just get unnoticed.

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Gunflint Charlie

I get about 50 rounds of golf in a year. Most of the guys I golf with are also hunters/fishermen. I have made connections in business but also been invited on hunting fishing excursions. One of the true benefits of golf is it's about a four mile walk. While it's not busting brush it usually involves some hills. Done two or three times a week it can't hurt. Accurately judging distances is also a side benefit. Yeah and then there's the nineteenth hole...!

Sounds a little like me, though my golf rarely involved business, and since retiring a few years ago my rounds are up to 80-90 per season. Always walk the hilly 4+ miles per round, except sometimes ride if playing a second round on a hot humid day. I'm a 9-10 handicap. The feeling of hitting a pure and accurate long iron is the best, a lot like making a clean kill on a difficult wingshot. I answered "no" on shooting clays, though I do it some each September to get re-acquainted with my guns. I about equally enjoy golf with my friends and bird hunting with my dogs. Learned both with my dad. October pulls me hard both ways, but bird hunting season is short, so it wins the month.

When I was a little kid in a rural town of 2500 pop., the doctors and lawyers, bankers and store owners, tradesmen and truck drivers got together to buy some hilly farmland and build a 9-hole golf course. They worked side by side to build the wood frame two-room shack of a clubhouse. My dad was one of them. He had a one-man eggs and dairy produce business, bought from creameries and chicken operations, rented space for a walk-in cooler, drove a refrigerated box truck, and sold/delivered to small town and outer ring suburban grocers and restaurants. When old enough I helped with loading and unloading the truck. I've been playing golf since I was 10 and can count on one hand the number of "rich men" I've played with in 50+ years.

Jay

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