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Red Lobster


vern faulkner

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Red Lobster fled Maine because they couldn't compete with the local seafood cooks and restaurants here.

Too bad.

Hey is there a Golden Corral in Camden?

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OC is correct.  Gulf of Mexico is a healthy body of water. The BP spill was bad but there are worse toxins than oil...

Gulf Seafood??

Not exactly fully recovered .

A largely anecdotal story from good old Mother Jones.

It did not address toxicity of the seafood, rather scarcity of oysters, and in the story that was attributed the to freshwater surge from letting the gates loose to keep the oil from coming upstream.  Large storms like hurricanes also cause freshwater surges.

There was a chart of the diminished CATCH of other species with no attempt to explain the causes, of which there could be many.  One of those might be the spill and the resultant diminished demand because consumers were scared to buy the stuff.  The main cause for the diminished CATCH is more likely that entire fleets of boats were destroyed in the hurricane and many fisherman simply got out of the business.

There was no attempt to explore those other causes in the article, the implication being that the decline is entirely caused by the spill.  The linked articles (except for the one that linked back to another MJ article from 2010) were about bottlenose dolphin.

It's a feature story at best, or very lazy journalism.

If anecdotal evidence is acceptable, the guys I know that fish the gulf out of Louisiana recreationally say that the fishing has never been better in their lives.  This is also likely a by-product of less commercial pressure.

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OC is correct.  Gulf of Mexico is a healthy body of water. The BP spill was bad but there are worse toxins than oil...

Gulf Seafood??

Not exactly fully recovered .

A largely anecdotal story from good old Mother Jones.

It did not address toxicity of the seafood, rather scarcity of oysters, and in the story that was attributed the to freshwater surge from letting the gates loose to keep the oil from coming upstream.  Large storms like hurricanes also cause freshwater surges.

There was a chart of the diminished CATCH of other species with no attempt to explain the causes, of which there could be many.  One of those might be the spill and the resultant diminished demand because consumers were scared to buy the stuff.  The main cause for the diminished CATCH is more likely that entire fleets of boats were destroyed in the hurricane and many fisherman simply got out of the business.

There was no attempt to explore those other causes in the article, the implication being that the decline is entirely caused by the spill.  The linked articles (except for the one that linked back to another MJ article from 2010) were about bottlenose dolphin.

It's a feature story at best, or very lazy journalism.

If anecdotal evidence is acceptable, the guys I know that fish the gulf out of Louisiana recreationally say that the fishing has never been better in their lives.  This is also likely a by-product of less commercial pressure.

Diminished catch due to lower demand, destroyed boats, influx of fresh water, etc.  These are all direct results of the oil spill though, no?

RI

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OC is correct.  Gulf of Mexico is a healthy body of water. The BP spill was bad but there are worse toxins than oil...

Gulf Seafood??

Not exactly fully recovered .

A largely anecdotal story from good old Mother Jones.

It did not address toxicity of the seafood, rather scarcity of oysters, and in the story that was attributed the to freshwater surge from letting the gates loose to keep the oil from coming upstream.  Large storms like hurricanes also cause freshwater surges.

There was a chart of the diminished CATCH of other species with no attempt to explain the causes, of which there could be many.  One of those might be the spill and the resultant diminished demand because consumers were scared to buy the stuff.  The main cause for the diminished CATCH is more likely that entire fleets of boats were destroyed in the hurricane and many fisherman simply got out of the business.

There was no attempt to explore those other causes in the article, the implication being that the decline is entirely caused by the spill.  The linked articles (except for the one that linked back to another MJ article from 2010) were about bottlenose dolphin.

It's a feature story at best, or very lazy journalism.

If anecdotal evidence is acceptable, the guys I know that fish the gulf out of Louisiana recreationally say that the fishing has never been better in their lives.  This is also likely a by-product of less commercial pressure.

Diminished catch due to lower demand, destroyed boats, influx of fresh water, etc.  These are all direct results of the oil spill though, no?

RI

No--some freshwater influx is due to huge storm systems.  The spill did not destroy any commercial boats nor any of the infrastructure (docks/fueling, shops, processing) that supports the fishing industry.  The hurricane(s) and flooding did that.  In a few short years there was a double whammy, with the fishing industry struggling to recover from the physical infrastructure losses from the hurricane and the perception among the public that the fish were not fit to eat after the spill.  That perception--much of it caused by needless hysteria--reduced demand.

Many long time fishermen, whose families had been in the business for generations, simply had to give up and try to find other work.  Clearly that would lead to a reduction in the catch.

The thread topic had drifted to toxicity levels in seafood from other countries, which is what Wade was referring to in his post.

Ben's link in his quote of Wade's post addressed the smaller catch and not the toxicity levels of the catch.  A classic drift.

I was trying to undrift an already drifting thread.  A usually fruitless endeavor.

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Hey. Its gone six pages and lasted over a week. Just confirms my suspicion that the way to get a really good thread going on a shooting forum is to talk about food.
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