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caleb

Why do you live where you live?

Why do you live where you live?  

  1. 1. Why do you live where you live?

    • Work
      Work
    • Family
      Work
    • Recreational Opportunities
      Work
    • Education
      Work
    • Scenery/Terrain/Aesthetics
      Work
    • Roots/Habit/Momentum
      Work
    • Other (please specify below)
      Work


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Greg Hartman
I find it interesting that people who live in places like I do, see places like SD and ND as the Promised Land; while some who live in those places are just there for work and want out.  I guess "the grass is greener" applies to most of us.

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max2
I find it interesting that people who live in places like I do, see places like SD and ND as the Promised Land; while some who live in those places are just there for work and want out.  I guess "the grass is greener" applies to most of us.

very true.

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Dogwood
I find it interesting that people who live in places like I do, see places like SD and ND as the Promised Land; while some who live in those places are just there for work and want out.  I guess "the grass is greener" applies to most of us.

Yep.

Guess that's why one dreams of two homes, each in a different "greener" spot.

For me that would be Northern MI in the spring/summer, MT/Idaho etc. in the fall winter for birds/mountain skiing.

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Rockdoc
I find it interesting that people who live in places like I do, see places like SD and ND as the Promised Land; while some who live in those places are just there for work and want out.  I guess "the grass is greener" applies to most of us.

Works for me and apparently for Robert Service

There's a race of men that don't fit in,

 A race that can't stay still;

So they break the hearts of kith and kin,

 And they roam the world at will.

They range the field and they rove the flood,

 And they climb the mountain's crest;

Theirs is the curse of the gypsy blood,

 And they don't know how to rest.

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Peent
I find it interesting that people who live in places like I do, see places like SD and ND as the Promised Land; while some who live in those places are just there for work and want out.  I guess "the grass is greener" applies to most of us.

We see those places in September or October.  Try visiting in January or July.

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Tim Frazier
I find it interesting that people who live in places like I do, see places like SD and ND as the Promised Land; while some who live in those places are just there for work and want out.  I guess "the grass is greener" applies to most of us.

Works for me and apparently for Robert Service

There's a race of men that don't fit in,

 A race that can't stay still;

So they break the hearts of kith and kin,

 And they roam the world at will.

They range the field and they rove the flood,

 And they climb the mountain's crest;

Theirs is the curse of the gypsy blood,

 And they don't know how to rest.

Excellent!

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mshowman

If one of the choices hadn't been Recreational Opportunities, I could have checked them all. Specifically, if it hadn't been for hunting, fishing and other good nature related opportunities.

My family has lived here in east-central Ohio for a long time. In fact, the farm I sold about 12 years ago had been deeded in my family's name since 1879. My wife and her family also grew up here. I was 23 when we were married and our two kids came around shortly after. The public schools are among the best in the state and I wanted them to take advantage of that. While they were still young I took an introductory level job that offered them almost free educations in their choice of several highly regarded private colleges. Then more job opportunities came along with the same employer and I ended up with a better job than I could have ever imagined.

Now I'm approaching retirement and I've never really lived more than 15 miles from where I was born. The kids have graduated from college and have move away, and I no longer need to continue working. I'm looking at those greener pastures for hunting and fishing but there still is one tie. My wife's 85 year old mother still lives here and won't ever consider leaving. And my wife can't bring herself to leave her mother with nobody to watch after her at this point in life. So here I am.

This has actually been a great place to live and raise a family but if things change with the MIL situation, I'd be out of here in a flash. The property has already been purchased and the new house plans are partially drawn.

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Chris Raymond

With the exception of my time in the military, my recreational opportunities have driven where I've lived.  Since graduating college and leaving the military, I've lived in Houghton, MI twice (three times if you count college), Traverse City, MI and even tried a short stint in Troy, MI but quickly learned that it wasn't for me and I needed to get back to a place with more opportunity for outdoor adventure.  

I've made decent money and have had rewarding opportunities but have passed up big money and significant career advancement to have lived where we have...to me it's not been a sacrifice.  However, my wife would actually prefer to live in a more metropolitan setting and has allowed me my outdoor vices...fortunately she's also been able to carve out a career for herself in medical claims management while working remotely.  

Now, we're looking at an upcoming move where we'll be leaving the state that is near and dear to my heart for the Park Falls, WI area...another location which has much to offer a guy that is focused on the woods and waters.  Additionally, it will be a good career move, as I change fields and enter the outdoor industry, with significant opportunity for upside potential within the next 3 - 7 years if I am reading the tea leaves correctly...tough to take but somebody has to do it I suppose.   ;-)

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UglyD
Came out here on an athletic scholarship because my parents said I couldn't accept one east of the Mississippi. (greatest gift they ever gave me ) Fell in love with the country- I can see me moving (Idaho or Montana) in a couple years when I retire , but certainly to complain would be a disservice to what I have received by being here.

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PWZ
Southwestern Maine. Close enough proximity to Portland and cities to the south for things that they offer in the way of food, music, arts, shopping, activities, decent employment, etc, and still able to walk out my door and hunt or fish. Short drive to the White Mountains, short drive to the ocean. Plenty of accessible land, and close enough to NH that I can go hunt there on Sundays.

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LostintheOzone

I live in WA. OR and WA. are two of the most beautiful states I've seen and I've seen most of them. Now that we are retired we could live anywhere but we like the PNW. There are enough outdoor recreational opportunities for me in the summer and fall to keep me off the street. In the winter we travel in the SW to get out of the rain. Plus my wife has family in WA and OR so she likes to be close by.

So for me it's outdoors stuff and decent weather to be outside doing outdoors stuff.

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PIOBill
There ain't no place like Texas and contrary to what the Congressman from Florida says, we are not all crazy.

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northern_hunting_mom

We moved to Alberta from the Yukon for work. We hated the 6 months we lived in Edmonton. Our town of 6000 is big enough to have all the daily/weekly services we need yet is small enough so we won't go insane. Edmonton is an hour away so it is a good compromise. Outdoor opportunities are not bad here. The one outdoor activity I wish was closer is fishing.

This

Amberasusual.jpg

was 30 minutes away in the Yukon. It would take a lot longer drive to reach waters like that now.

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Chops

I voted recreational opportunities but in reality it was a happy meeting of a job opportunity in a place I wanted to move to.  Opportunities in my field are extremely limited and most are in large urban areas.  When I had the chance to move from Kentucky to South Dakota, and a pay raise to boot, the choice was easy.  Luckily my wife was game for a new adventure and our kids were too young to care about a move.  We’ve been here two years now and it’s hard to imagine myself living anywhere else.  There's a trout stream a few blocks from my house, deer and turkey hunting is 15 minutes away, and there is great upland and waterfowl hunting withing a couple hours.  I’d still consider relocating to Wyoming, Montana, or Idaho but it probably will never happened and I’m fine with that.  

Sometimes I wish our extended families were closer but after a summer or xmas visit I remember why we moved so far away.  :)

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WyomingArt

Taught Jr High science for a few years, then went into industry. Fast forward a few years, making good money for my age, and rapidly becoming more unhappy working 60-75 hrs a week in a dysfunctional workplace, no time for family, feeling trapped.

Quit, moved west, took a  job at lower money, never looked back. Lowered the lifestyle expenses, lived on less, always invested a portion of the wages, worked an extra job when money was tight. Got to raise my boys in one of the last best places w/ elk, moose, sheep, deer, bears, ducks, geese, out the door, Cutthroat trout 3 minutes from the house I built myself. Cut a lot of firewood, floated a lot of trout rivers, enjoyed a couple pretty good bird dogs,  ate a lot of wild meat and

Life was good. Now too old and stove up to chase elk

( that's pretty much a young man's game) but a  good wife, good friends, birds and fish,  picking a little guitar,  make retirement worthwhile.

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