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Why do you live where you live?


Why do you live where you live?  

  1. 1. Why do you live where you live?

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I chose family.  When I got out of the Army it was so my kids could grow up around family like I did.  I had been away in one form or another for 11 years and it seemed like the right thing to do.  I don't really know if it was, now, 21 years latter.  I think it was for my kids as they have flourished, we have traveled quite a bit and they are free souls.  I have encouraged them to not stay here just for us as we will travel to see them and we will always be a family.   I don't want them tied up like I have been.

It's not all bad, I have access to quite a bit of private property all around me.  The hunting for many game species was very good as recently as 5-6 years ago, but much has changed.  I have the double whammy of cheap housing ($500 mortgage) and decent pay (mid 90s).  I would take a large pay cut to move anywhere more rural, even with-in my current employer a move to PA would cost me 10,000 a year and my mortgage would almost double.  So I AM stuck!

But...for quite a few years now I've been hunting PA almost every weekend.  Access to 10s of thousands of acres of public land is intoxicating and I can be in the "Land of Snowshoes and Ravens" in 2-3 hours.  I don't think I'm anti-social but I love not seeing ANYONE for hours upon hours in the mountains.  I live for it!  In the summers I go up once or twice to the Adirondacks for the same reason.  Its actually a little tougher to get away from the crowds up there though!

I get 5 weeks vacation a year and 11 holidays, so each year I try to get more creative in how I use it.  I believe that will be the secrete to "surviving" the next 8 years till I can retire (read work part time)  So I try to be grateful and remember that it could sure be worse.

Best of all are the friendships I have made, most through this board.  I can't imagine my life without the people I've met here, regardless of where I lived.  I have been blessed with them and I will never take that for granted.

So it's not too bad to be "Stuck in Ohio" :<img src=:'>

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I could write a book on this question and just might someday.

Cliffs Notes version.

Grew up in southeast MA, when it was very rural.

Watched my hometown turn into Yuppyville.

Could'nt afford to buy a house there and didn't want to once married with kids on the way.

Packed a UHaul with wife, 4 year old daughter, 2 year old Golden Retriever, and a small flock of chickens (not kidding) and bought/moved to a broken down small farmhouse in a VERY RURAL spot in mid-Maine. Been here 28 years now.

Scratched away an existence as a freelance commercial artist while wife worked in medical field/respiratory therapy.

Why....to give my kids an opportunity to be big fish in a small pond and to pursue my outdoor hunting and fishing pursuits.

At the least....that move spawned Upland Journal.

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I have a wife . This is where she wants to live . Need I say more ???

You stated my case perfectly Al.  :(

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When I retired, I bought a motorhome, drove 7,000 miles to Alaska with the intention of spending my summers there, fishing for Pacific salmon and monster rainbows, then hunting ptarmigan and grouse when the seasons opened in early August. When the first snows came, we headed south, grouse hunting through Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta, then hunting prairie grouse, huns and waterfowl in Saskatchewan. We hunted our way through Montana, Idaho, both Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mex and wound up in Arizona by December. When hunting seasons ended in mid Feb, we parked the motorhome on a Mexican beach and mostly just relaxed on the beach if we weren't fishing. Then, in May, we headed north to do it all over again.

We did that for a few years and it was just grand. But through all of our travels, we always were on the lookout for the right place for us to re-establish a home base. We found it here, in Arizona, surrounded by millions of acres of National Forest and just 10 minutes to a huge lake where I keep a houseboat on an isolated, uninhabited island. In the summers, I commute to the houseboat with my bassboat. I still spend months on the road in the motorhome, going to all the best bird hunting places in North America, but at the end of the season, I have a place to come home to.

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I moved here years ago to teach at a small high school of about 400 kids.  There was job security and a family atmosphere at the school.  Were I not teaching there, I probably would not still be teaching.  

I nearly left after a season of driving to the mountains to not shoot grouse.  But, I discovered some reliable woodcock coverts and developed some friendships hunting them that got me to stick around.  I like where I live.  I can be at the Opera in 30 minutes or in a treestand or canoe in 20.  I live on the edge of a bedroom community North of Winston-Salem.  I get small town, country, and city all nearby.  I am within an hour of about everything a man needs. We bought a house a bit over a year ago, so I am kind of committed for a few years anyhow.  But, I do think about heading North or West from time to time.

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pa'tridge hunters
When we moved to Maine twenty nine years ago Cindy's Uncle Pete told us, "You won't make much money, but you will have fun". He was right! Best move we ever could have made.
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I have a wife . This is where she wants to live . Need I say more ???

You are a good man, Al! :<img src=:'> Hit that sucker nail square, you did!

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When I retired we moved onto the boat and sailed south to the Bahamas. We discovered the area around Pamlico Sound and liked it. I raised a family on Long Island NY. It became so crowded and expensive it made living there, on a retirement income, not plausible.

Now that I've been here I would relocate if the Admiral would OK it. Too damned hot in the summer......that's why we spend it in Pa. Really miss the large garden we had in NY. Can't have a veggie garden as we leave too early to harvest.

If I had my way I would move back north to a house I would spend all my time in, but maybe escape to a warmer place in Feb and March. Or maybe move back onto a boat full time.

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I wanted to live in the desert and moved out here 20+ years ago.  In the beginning a 30 minute drive would put me into quail and I had many good years of chasing them with good dove shooting in the early season for a warm up.  About 12 years ago I was getting tired of the urban sprawl and was thinking of moving up to Idaho.  About 10 years ago I met my wife and then we got married, she was born and raised here with her 7 brothers and sisters who are all here and we live a mile or so from her Mom.  She would be miserable leaving all them and all the nieces and nephews as well.  I am stuck, fortunately we are very happy and get along well.  I also really like my job.  I pretty much dislike this place now and the past couple years bird hunting has been pretty dismal due to the unrestricted urban sprawl and years of drought.   We are blessed with a wonderful public shooting facility "Ben Avery" and lots of hiking trails and good weather except for the summer so I keep trying to see the glass as half full.   I grew up in Northern Iowa and love to fish for smallmouth bass along small rivers, hunting pheasants and ducks.  Fall was my favorite time of the year.
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Lots of great responses, guys.  Thanks.

I started thinking about this topic while driving from MN to NY, and realizing that every move I've ever made has been either education or work related.  I've moved six times in the past seven years.

Two points jumped to mind while moving across the country.

First, it's not really that bad to be moving due to economic opportunity.  After all, the modern idea that individuals ought to be free to move at will only emerged at the end of feudalism five to six hundred years ago, and only really because the feudal landowners lost out to the capitalists in a competition for labor.  The reason we can move today is mostly in order to work, to fulfill the labor-needs of capitalists.  That's the reason freedom of movement for common peasants like me exists in the first place.  Were it not for capitalism and capitalists needing labor in urban centers circa AD 1600, I'd probably be living on some 40 acre plot of land in what used to be Prussia right now.

But, second, I wish that between 1600 and 2015, humans had figured out how to make freedom of movement absolute and disconnect it from the demands of capital on labor that originally produced the freedom of movement for commoners.  I wish that today I could choose where to live without serious financial repercussions, rather than having to chase work around the country to particular locations in order to make a real living. I'd love to live in MT, or ID, or eastern WA. but I'd be broke and probably unemployed if I did.  The places I wish I could live are off limits unless you want to bring your own money and your own women, because the prospects there for both aren't very good.  I've got the woman part figured out, but my 401k still won't sustain such an adventure for very long.  For now, I'm in that seventeenth century position so many people who have responded to this poll find themselves: chasing work at the expense of place.

Someday I hope this all pays off and I find myself free to live where I want to live without living in poverty to do so.

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I'd love to live in MT, or ID, or eastern WA. but

Someday I hope this all pays off and I find myself free to live where I want to live without living in poverty to do so.

Living in poverty has it's moments  :D   I think you have to be happy . Everyone , especially my accountant thought I was nuts when I  gave up my high pressure life to follow my dream of becoming a grouse bum.  Like our four legged friends life is  to short....

Follow your dream Caleb

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braque du upstate
upstate kinda sucks, but it's home. if family wasn't here , i'd probably move. lucky if we visit family once a month.
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Samuel Hoggson

It was the kids.  My parents live ten miles away, so was familiar with the area.  C and I wanted the kids we did not yet have to live a small town Norman Rockwell childhood - one that mostly no longer exists.  We found it.  The kids lived it - fully.  

To do this we left conveniences, professional goals, and much income potential on the table.  Staying in one place is far from the norm in my profession.  At one point we were thinking of uprooting.  But I promised a teary-eyed seven year old daughter that I would find some way to stay.  So the rubber met the road, but no regrets.  Unlike many of Piscataquis county's mill towns, D-F has a great school system.    

Sean is off to WPI in August.  We now must decide if this place is manageable the rest of the way.  Our hearts say "yes".  But dunno.

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All of the above.  Both my wife and my families have been here three generations.  It's been a terrific place to raise a family.  We thoroughly enjoy all the recreational opportunities.  

We feel fortunate that this is also a great place for my work.

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