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Why do you live where you live?


Why do you live where you live?  

  1. 1. Why do you live where you live?

    • Work
      Work
    • Family
      Work
    • Recreational Opportunities
      Work
    • Education
      Work
    • Scenery/Terrain/Aesthetics
      Work
    • Roots/Habit/Momentum
      Work
    • Other (please specify below)
      Work


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I picked scenery/terrain/aesthetics. For the last 50 years I've lived one place or another within 20 miles of where I'm at today. Honestly I can't think of a reason to move. I'm happy here in central Utah.

At the same time I would I feel pretty comfortable and at home anywhere in the Rocky Mountains. As long as I have mountains in my backyard and access to lots of public ground I would be happy; so, Idaho, western Wyoming and Montana would be just fine too.

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Funny I never hear anyone from the west clamoring to move east but plenty of easterners who yearn to move west.  Mountain states folks sure seem the happiest.
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Funny I never hear anyone from the west clamoring to move east but plenty of easterners who yearn to move west.  Mountain states folks sure seem the happiest.

Interesting and I'm sure it true for the most part.  Personally I like visiting the west, but my heart will always be in the east.  Mostly due to more game per acre.  Out west things are far apart, in Ohio you can have 100acres and hunt deer/turkey/squirrel/rabbits/dove/ducks/geese on that property for a long time, generations maybe.  Most of what I've seen out west it would take 10 times that amount of area to have game.  We have taken thirty some deer over the last 20 years on my dads 80 acres, near 20 turkeys, who knows about rabbits and squirrels.

But I do like to visit, and it sure is beautiful!

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North Dakota Hntr

Other than a 6 year jist in the military, ND has been my home for my entire life. My family lives here, spread across the state. I love ND and what it as to offer in outdoor recreation. It's hard to beat the bird hunting, at least here, in the western part of the state. There are still places that offer great solitude and natural beauty, which I must have. I spent 7 hrs  and about 175 miles on gravel roads and a couple hrs on foot last Sunday and saw one vehicle and no people. I heard only the noises of nature. ND is in my blood.

That being said, the sleepy town I have lived in for 27 yrs is not longer so sleepy. The oil boom has changes things and I'm not as enamored as before. My wife and I are feeling the need for a change. We have a pretty good idea of where we would like to relocate and it offers many of those things without the chaos of the boom. Wherever we decide, it will be west of here.

Craig

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Steelheadfred

When I was a kid my dad would come home from this place up north with a red Coleman cooler full of bright silver fish; smitten with fishing from the day I was able to cast; I got my first taste of this magical place when I was in the 7th grade, would have been sixth grade but I broke my collar bone playing hockey.

Since I got that taste, I knew I wanted to be there more than 3 long weekends a year.

I now live 24.5 miles from that place, I've been very fortunate in the lady  that somehow said yes that her dream was this place too. I've been lucky in my career path, but at the same time I had a big apatite for risk and work really hard and play really hard, now I parent really hard too.

I wouldn't live anywhere else on the planet, I'd still live here if I made 1/4th of what I make now, my brother followed me and now has his own family and we are about as tight any two brothers you'll ever meet. I expect my parents to follow shortly as my mom is about to retire.

This place has enough commerce to do really well if you want too, a very strong public school system, enough places to eat, and four seasons of recreation, public lands, yet still feels like a small town.

I hope to someday have a Hotel in Southwest Florida and enough money for a River House.

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This is an interesting thread!

 The short answer is that I was PCSed (moved to you civilians) to San Antonio years ago, then retired. We live on a small place on the first hill of the Balcones Escarpment, going from south to north, in the Hill Country of central Texas.

 The longer answer is that as a native Texan, I was never going to live anywhere else after I retired. Born here, graduated from High School here and then from the University of Texas. Uncle Sugar took or sent me (take your pick!) all over Europe, to parts of Canada and places in between.

 I have been to every state in the US bar Alaska. I found something to like in all of them except southern California. I really like the plains states and the mountain west.

 As I sit typing this, up on our "mountain", it is 65 degrees outside; it was a lovely day. That is payback from all those hot as hell days of August. Until the damn drought hit my friends and I had prolly the best wild bob white hunting in the US. Excellent scaled quail as well and the season is 4 months long. People come from many different places to hunt whitewing doves right where we live (they flew back north again in February this year, the earliest I have ever seen.) Excellent coastal fishing and duck hunting is 3 hours away. None of it was free, but all is or was very good.

 And, as the wife and I get older, we have found that the world class medical care here is more important that we would have believed. We have wonderful friends, a very nice church, terrific restaurants and my brother in only 90 miles away.

 Best of all really is that I am at home in Texas, where in my part of Texas a man is expected to stand on his own two feet, and to tell the truth; where a man's word is his bond, where handshake deals worth millions are done every day. Where gentlemen respect women and are to be gentle to children. Where being able to shoot straight is still considered a virtue and one is expected to be a positive part of the community.

 We have our share of bastages and jerks but they are exceptions.        And besides, the wife and I hate cold weather!!!

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Reading quailguy and a few other peoples love of home makes me so envious. When I grew up we lived all over first bouncing from Wisconsin to southern Florida then living in various places around southern Florida and finally moving to northeastern Illinois and living all over the Chicago suburbs. The closest I get to feeling that I’m “home” is whenever I leave the country and come back I’m always happy to come home to the USA. I guess that’s why I’ve adopted so well to living in my RV, as long as I’m parked somewhere in the USA I’m home!
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I've lived all over the country, and finally chose to live in Colorado for the huge range of year round outdoor recreation opportunities.  I just wish we had more birds to hunt.
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I chose work because my Wife and I originally relocated from Western WA. to Eastern WA. because of her work. However, the real reason was to get away from the People's Republic of Western WA. The mindset East of the Cascade Mountains was more to our own than the narrow minded, "But…but we're liberals!" of the "Coasties".

We live in the North Palouse Region, in a small town of 500, just South of Spokane. We're surrounded by private land, but pheasants, CA. quail, and Huns offer variety in varying states of abundance. Beautiful country, but I wish Spokane County offered more public land for upland game. Relocation one last time to Idaho or Montana seems the next step.

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I voted Other because it is a combination of reasons why I live here: Family, recreation, roots, work, etc. I grew up here and back then it was pretty boring. Then I joined the Army and travelled the world, saw lots of different lifestyles and people, and decided that Dorothy had it right, "There is no place like home." After retirement from the military I worked in Iraq and Afghanistan for a couple years as a telecom contractor and was able to amass enough money to pay off all my bills and purchase 40 acres in the woods in my home town. I have birds and deer out my back door. I now have 200 acres of mixed hardwood and popple.  After globetrotting for years and 5 deployments to the sandbox, boring is pretty welcome. My pension covers all my expenses and my job as an AEMT pays for my toys. The Upper Peninsula isn't for everyone, but I like the lifestyle and have learned to take the weather as it comes. Couldn't imagine living anywhere else, except maybe Montana or Alaska.
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South Alabama born and raised. Left for 6 years while in the service and couldn't wait to get back. Quail, woodcock, dove, waterfowl. 75 day gun deer season. Can fish fresh,salt, and inshore all within an hour. Low cost of living helps out too!
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grousehunter 61
Idaho, need I say more......I have lived in PA. NV. Cal. Arkansas. Texas. Utah. and NY. Now understand, I say lived, not just passed through. Our kids are all full grown, the oldest is 53, and gone, grandkids are all over the place, great grandkids are in school, so we stay right here in Idaho. More public land then private, great deer hunting, elk hunting, moose hunting, big horn sheep, antelope hunting, and all kinds of bird hunting. Here you can hunt ruff grouse, blue grouse  spruce grouse, huns and chukar all in the same day. We have steelhead, salmon and trout in the back yard and I mean in the backyard. I can shoot of my deck, train my dog in the front yard and shoot pigeons in the driveway. Drawbacksacks, its 10 miles to a town of 400, 40 miles to do any shopping, 150 miles to any of the big stores. We put a lot of mileage on our vehicles.
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Currently in AZ.  Mostly, I think, because of family.   As mom and dad get older, they rely on us more and more.  I have moved a lot throughout all of my life.   Grew up a navy brat, and in 21 years of marriage I have moved 13 times for work and school.   I have been in the same house for 6 years.   That is twice as long as anywhere else in my life.  

I love where I am (near family in some of the most beautiful country in the world) but I don't like that I have to drive so far to find birds and to fish.

However, I am constantly looking at land in NV and ID.   I want 20-50 acres with water, that is near good hunting and fishing.  Hopefully I will one day make it happen.  The problem for now is that I have a Purdey taste on a CZ budget.

Was just looking online, last night,  at 20 acres in ID.  My kids have all been going to school in Rexburg...and my wife would love to be closer to them.  Only time will tell.

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