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Steve Sutton

Larry, I can think of four or five......

Gene Kelly

Micheal York

Gabriel Byrne

Chris O'Donnel

Though I've always though the actors that portrayed Richelieu, Rochfort, and the other Musketeers had the richer parts and better portrayals......and lets not forget the ladies who have played Lady D'Winter and Constance.....Lana Turner, Milla Jovavich and Rebecca D'Mornay as My Lady de Winter and Raquel Welch as Constance were always more fun than the overdressed Musketeers...

And here's a Three Musketeers question........

WHO was voice for DOGtanian in the Three Muskahounds...we are after all a DOG site......

Steve

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ccavacini
Here's a tricky one.

The name of the sword that Arthur pulled from the stone  to become king of England.

Excalibur

Nope

Good question, and the vast majority get the answer wrong.

Excalibur was Arthur's invincible sword given to him by The Lady of the Lake and was to be returned on Arthur's death. The Sword in the Stone was a ceremonial sword (used for knighting men etc.)

Good one.  The only reference to the sword from the stone is the "Miraculous" sword.

Now, for the real toughy.....What does Excalibur mean?

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Steve Sutton

Doesn't the "sword in the stone" thing occur in about five or six different ethnic versions?.....including the Viking version, which would have preceded Arthur, where the sword is stuck in a tree?......

Without meaning any offense to those of a Religious bent the "sword in the stone" appears as often in pagan and animistic  cultures as do "virgin births" and "resurrections" do in Christian history.......

Don't recall the names of the sword in each legend but I'm pretty sure that it occurs in similar form in  each of the English Isle cultures and histories...often changing as those cultures were absorbed by conquerors.......

Steve

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Larry Brown

Larry, I can think of four or five......

Gene Kelly

Micheal York

Gabriel Byrne

Chris O'Donnel

Though I've always though the actors that portrayed Richelieu, Rochfort, and the other Musketeers had the richer parts and better portrayals......and lets not forget the ladies who have played Lady D'Winter and Constance.....Lana Turner, Milla Jovavich and Rebecca D'Mornay as My Lady de Winter and Raquel Welch as Constance were always more fun than the overdressed Musketeers...

And here's a Three Musketeers question........

WHO was voice for DOGtanian in the Three Muskahounds...we are after all a DOG site......

Steve

Steve, that's a good list.  I'm pretty sure Doug Fairbanks Sr was D'Artagnan in a silent version, but you pretty much covered the ones I know about.  Michael York x 2:  "Three Musketeers" and "Four Musketeers".  I think the version that had Chris O'Donnell was also referred to as "Young Guns With Swords".  Had both Charlie Sheen and Kiefer Sutherland.

Speaking of swashbucklers, best duel I've ever seen:  Stewart Granger and Mel Ferrer in "Scaramouche".  Goes on for like 7 or 8 minutes.  Choreography for that one had to be tough.  And then there's always Cary Elwes and Mandy Patinkin in "The Princess Bride".

Let's try another musical one:  The four members of the Mamas and the Papas?  3 are pretty easy . . .

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Steve Sutton

I've always liked the swordfights that featured Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Errol Flynn....I remember reading that Fairbanks was a hell of a swordsman while Flynn was somewhat indifferent to it....Fairbanks and good choreography covered for him......

Been a LONG TIME since I've seen it but the fight that sticks in my mind is Charleston Heston kills Sophia Loren's Father, (I think it was her Father).....

These days the quality of "swordfights" is the best ever with shows like Black Sails and Game of Thrones and other "Sword and Sorcery" shows....maybe its digital but it has more imagination than the old up right, up left, down left, down right, repeat, repeat, repeat, that the old fights used to have.......

Steve

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ccavacini

Doesn't the "sword in the stone" thing occur in about five or six different ethnic versions?.....including the Viking version, which would have preceded Arthur, where the sword is stuck in a tree?......

Without meaning any offense to those of a Religious bent the "sword in the stone" appears as often in pagan and animistic  cultures as do "virgin births" and "resurrections" do in Christian history.......

Don't recall the names of the sword in each legend but I'm pretty sure that it occurs in similar form in  each of the English Isle cultures and histories...often changing as those cultures were absorbed by conquerors.......

Steve

Steve, I assume the sword motif has been around a long time, each ethnicity claiming to be the source.

The Arthurian Legends just seemed to have the loudest voice.

There just so many symbols to go around--sword---crown, etc., and I'm sure that's why so many culture's legends overlap.

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Scaramouche was a great movie, especially when a 11 year old boy had to pick up and exchange 24 roadside bottles at 2 cents per, to afford the admission in 1953. For weeks after wards we played at sword fighting that summer. I read Rafael Sabbatini's original book later in high school. I still consider that book to be a favourite.

I don't believe that Excalibur means anything specific, but the word has its origins in the Welsh language being that Wales is where I believe was the site of the origin of the Arthurian Legends.

This discussion brings back some of my favourite topics.

The original Mamas and Papas were Cass Elliot, John and Michelle Phillips and Denny Doherty, a guy from Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"John and Denny were singing for a penny in LA, you know where that's at. And, no one's getting fat 'cept Mama Cass."

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Cooter Brown

Here's a tricky one.

The name of the sword that Arthur pulled from the stone  to become king of England.

Excalibur

Nope

Good question, and the vast majority get the answer wrong.

Excalibur was Arthur's invincible sword given to him by The Lady of the Lake and was to be returned on Arthur's death. The Sword in the Stone was a ceremonial sword (used for knighting men etc.)

And the genesis of one of the great exchanges in cinema:

Arthur:I am your king.

Woman: Well, I didn't vote for you.

King Arthur: You don't vote for kings.

Woman: Well how'd you become king then?

[Angelic music plays... ]

King Arthur: The Lady of the Lake, her arm clad in the purest shimmering samite held aloft Excalibur from the bosom of the water, signifying by divine providence that I, Arthur, was to carry Excalibur. THAT is why I am your king.

Dennis: [interrupting] Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.

Dennis: Oh, but you can't expect to wield supreme executive power just because some watery tart threw a sword at you.

Dennis: Oh but if I went 'round sayin' I was Emperor, just because some moistened bint lobbed a scimitar at me, they'd put me away.

Dennis: Come and see the violence inherent in the system. Help! Help! I'm being repressed!

King Arthur: Bloody peasant!

Dennis: Oh, what a giveaway! Did you hear that? Did you hear that, eh? That's what I'm on about! Did you see him repressing me? You saw him, didn't you?

It's kind of a gimme, but what movie?

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Steve Sutton

"moistened bint".....what a line....I guess the English did contribute something to the those of us who speak AMERICAN.....

and what a Great Movie.....

RUN AWAY....RUN AWAYYYY.....

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plainsman
In the Popeye episode where Popeye goes to rescue his dad 'Poopdeck Pappy' from the natives on the tropical island, what was the name of the tribe of evil natives?

Let's try this again,...anyone remember?

Goons?

Yes, the Goons of Goon Island.

In the episode, Popeye goes to the Island to rescue his Dad Pappy, but gets captured and as the Goons are carrying him off, his can of spinach rolls out of his reach,...but low and behold, in lands near the cage where Pappy is held prisoner. Pappy reached through the bars, and grabbed the can, and who would have guessed it, but the spinach worked on Pappy too, and he comes to the rescue.

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Larry Brown

Scaramouche was a great movie, especially when a 11 year old boy had to pick up and exchange 24 roadside bottles at 2 cents per, to afford the admission in 1953. For weeks after wards we played at sword fighting that summer. I read Rafael Sabbatini's original book later in high school. I still consider that book to be a favourite.

I don't believe that Excalibur means anything specific, but the word has its origins in the Welsh language being that Wales is where I believe was the site of the origin of the Arthurian Legends.

This discussion brings back some of my favourite topics.

The original Mamas and Papas were Cass Elliot, John and Michelle Phillips and Denny Doherty, a guy from Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"John and Denny were singing for a penny in LA, you know where that's at. And, no one's getting fat 'cept Mama Cass."

Good job, Ben.  I figured you might get Denny since he's Canadian.

The novel "Scaramouche" is great.  Includes a lot more political material pertaining to the French Revolution than does the movie.  But that duel in the theater with Granger and Mel Ferrer is fantastic!

Trivia:  Stewart Granger was a stage name.  If you know his real name, you'll know why he changed it.

Re actors who could fence:  Basil Rathbone was very good, but it seems he was always a villain.  Fought Flynn in "Robin Hood" and "Captain Blood", and Tyrone Power in "Zorro".

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ccavacini
I don't believe that Excalibur means anything specific, but the word has its origins in the Welsh language being that Wales is where I believe was the site of the origin of the Arthurian Legends.

Excalibur  "Cut Steel"

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ccavacini
Here's a tricky one.

The name of the sword that Arthur pulled from the stone  to become king of England.

Excalibur

Nope

Good question, and the vast majority get the answer wrong.

Excalibur was Arthur's invincible sword given to him by The Lady of the Lake and was to be returned on Arthur's death. The Sword in the Stone was a ceremonial sword (used for knighting men etc.)

And the genesis of one of the great exchanges in cinema:

Arthur:I am your king.

Woman: Well, I didn't vote for you.

King Arthur: You don't vote for kings.

Woman: Well how'd you become king then?

[Angelic music plays... ]

King Arthur: The Lady of the Lake, her arm clad in the purest shimmering samite held aloft Excalibur from the bosom of the water, signifying by divine providence that I, Arthur, was to carry Excalibur. THAT is why I am your king.

Dennis: [interrupting] Listen, strange women lyin' in ponds distributin' swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.

Dennis: Oh, but you can't expect to wield supreme executive power just because some watery tart threw a sword at you.

Dennis: Oh but if I went 'round sayin' I was Emperor, just because some moistened bint lobbed a scimitar at me, they'd put me away.

Dennis: Come and see the violence inherent in the system. Help! Help! I'm being repressed!

King Arthur: Bloody peasant!

Dennis: Oh, what a giveaway! Did you hear that? Did you hear that, eh? That's what I'm on about! Did you see him repressing me? You saw him, didn't you?

It's kind of a gimme, but what movie?

Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

And...."None shall pass."

"It's only a flesh wound."

"What are you going to do, bleed on me?"

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